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Adverse drug events in children during hospitalization and after discharge in a Norwegian university hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19260
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(1):88-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
I. Buajordet
F. Wesenberg
O. Brørs
A. Langslet
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingebjorg.buajordet@legemiddelverket.no
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(1):88-94
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Drug Interactions
Drug Therapy - adverse effects
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The frequency and characteristics of adverse drug events (ADEs) in children hospitalized in the paediatric department of Ullevaal University Hospital, Norway, were determined using intensive monitoring. Of 579 children treated with drugs, 28% experienced ADEs; 7% at the time of admission, 18% during hospitalization and 9% after discharge. All children treated for cancer, 19% treated with anti-infective drugs, 15% treated with antiasthmatics and 10% treated with drugs affecting the nervous system experienced ADEs. The most frequent events were gastrointestinal, CNS- and skin reactions and 19% were considered as serious. ADEs caused 6% of the admissions and 44% required interventions. Most ADEs were found by screening patient records, where physicians mostly described adverse drug events requiring interventions and nurses described less serious events. Parents reported 14% of the events, of which a majority were CNS reactions. CNS reactions may be more common than expected and observations by parents are important when investigating such reactions in children. Conclusions: ADEs, mainly gastrointestinal, CNS and skin reactions related to drugs affecting the nervous system, anti-infectives and antiasthmatics, were seen in 28% of the patients. The reporting of events by parents was a useful supplement to the screening of patient records.
PubMed ID
11883826 View in PubMed
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The degree of myelosuppression during maintenance therapy of adolescents with B-lineage intermediate risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia predicts risk of relapse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98165
Source
Leukemia. 2010 Apr;24(4):715-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010

Deletion of the Ink4-locus (the p16ink4a, p14ARF and p15ink4b genes) predicts relapse in children with ALL treated according to the Nordic protocols NOPHO-86 and NOPHO-92.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18860
Source
Leukemia. 2002 Oct;16(10):2037-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
T M Calero Moreno
G. Gustafsson
S. Garwicz
D. Grandér
G K Jonmundsson
B-M Frost
A. Mäkipernaa
O. Rasool
E-R Savolainen
K. Schmiegelow
S. Söderhäll
K. Vettenranta
F. Wesenberg
S. Einhorn
M. Heyman
Author Affiliation
Research Laboratory of Radiumhemmet, CCK Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Leukemia. 2002 Oct;16(10):2037-45
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Base Sequence
Blotting, Southern
Cell Cycle Proteins - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p15
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16 - genetics
DNA Primers
Female
Gene Deletion
Humans
Infant
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1 - drug therapy - genetics - pathology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Suppressor Protein p14ARF - genetics
Tumor Suppressor Proteins
Abstract
Inactivation of the Ink4 gene locus locus on 9p comprising the tumour suppressor gene p16ink4a and its neighbours p14ARF and p15ink4b is common in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), but the prognostic significance is controversial. DNA from 230 patients was retrospectively analysed by Southern blotting, single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and sequencing techniques. The results were correlated with clinical characteristics and outcome. One hundred and ninety-four fully analysed patients, similarly treated using the Nordic NOPHO-86 or the current NOPHO-92 protocols, were included in the outcome analysis. Deletions approached a minimally deleted region between the p16ink4a and p15ink4b genes, making the p14ARF gene the most commonly deleted coding sequence. Bi-allelic deletion was associated with high white blood cell count (WBC) (P
PubMed ID
12357355 View in PubMed
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[High dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in malignant disorders. Excerpt from the statement by the advisory group of the State Health Services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22483
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 10;116(21):2577-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1996
Author
H. Holte
S O Kvaløy
T. Engan
S A Evensen
O. Mella
J M Tangen
F. Wesenberg
E A Wist
Author Affiliation
Onkologisk avdeling, Det Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 10;116(21):2577-81
Date
Sep-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - economics
Humans
Neoplasms - radiotherapy - therapy
Norway
Radiotherapy Dosage
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
New biomedical knowledge may improve the diagnostic procedures and treatment provided by the Health Services, but at additional cost. In a social democratic health care system, the hospital budgets have no room for expensive, new procedures or treatments, unless these are funded through extra allocation from the central authorities. High dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in malignant disorders is an example of a new and promising, but rather expensive treatment, but its role in cancer therapy has yet to be established. The indications for testing high dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in various malignancies are discussed, with emphasis on the principles for deciding which categories of disease should have priority. The authors suggest some malignant disorders for which high dose therapy with stem cell support should be explored versus conventional treatment in randomised prospective trials.
PubMed ID
8928130 View in PubMed
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Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in childhood in Norway: a prospective, population-based registration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32526
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2000 Oct-Nov;17(7):551-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Zeller
J. Helgestad
M. Hellebostad
S. Kolmannskog
T. Nystad
K. Stensvold
F. Wesenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Central Hospital of Akershus, Nordbyhagen, Norway. bem.zeller@ah.telia.no
Source
Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2000 Oct-Nov;17(7):551-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bone Marrow - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Platelet Count
Prospective Studies
Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Registries
Sex Factors
Abstract
A prospective, population-based registration of children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was performed in Norway in 1996 and 1997. Ninety-two cases were identified, indicating an incidence of 5.3 per 100,000 children under 15 years. The sex ratio (female/male) was 1.2/1. Fifty-six percent presented with cutaneous signs only. The lowest platelet count was
PubMed ID
11033730 View in PubMed
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Increased uptake of social security benefits among long-term survivors of cancer in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood: a Norwegian population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115655
Source
Br J Cancer. 2013 Apr 16;108(7):1525-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-2013
Author
S. Ghaderi
A. Engeland
D. Moster
E. Ruud
A. Syse
F. Wesenberg
T. Bjørge
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen 5018, Norway. Sara.Ghaderi@isf.uib.no
Source
Br J Cancer. 2013 Apr 16;108(7):1525-33
Date
Apr-16-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Neoplasms - economics - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
As the number of cancer survivors increases, their health and welfare have come into focus. Thus, long-term medical consequences of cancer at a young age (
Notes
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PubMed ID
23481179 View in PubMed
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[Investigation and treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34684
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Aug 10;116(18):2157-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1996
Author
B. Zeller
A. Glomstein
F. Wesenberg
Author Affiliation
Barncklinikken, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Aug 10;116(18):2157-9
Date
Aug-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
English Abstract
Guidelines
Humans
Norway
Pediatrics
Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Questionnaires
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in children has been debated for a long time. Some years ago the Norwegian paediatric haematology and oncology group proposed guidelines for investigation and therapy. In order to assess the present management of ITP in Norway, we sent a questionnaire to all paediatric departments. Answers from 22 departments could be analyzed. The estimated number of new ITP cases was 54, giving an incidence of 6.7 per 100,000 children. Most of the departments treat only a few patients (one to three patients a year). Investigation and treatment of ITP follows roughly the Norwegian guidelines. Disagreement exists about the indication for start of drug treatment (the lowest accepted platelet count differed from
PubMed ID
8801655 View in PubMed
Less detail

Outcome after first relapse in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population-based study of 315 patients from the Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (NOPHO).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23025
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1995 Nov;25(5):372-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
H. Schroeder
S. Garwicz
J. Kristinsson
M A Siimes
F. Wesenberg
G. Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1995 Nov;25(5):372-8
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bone Marrow - pathology
Bone Neoplasms - pathology
Central Nervous System Neoplasms - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - pathology - therapy
Leukemia, T-Cell, Acute - pathology
Male
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - therapy
Population Surveillance
Probability
Prognosis
Remission Induction
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Testicular Neoplasms - pathology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study reports the outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a population-based study of 809 children over 1 year of age diagnosed July 1981 through June 1986 and with non-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the five Nordic countries. By January 1994, 315 children had suffered at least one relapse. The bone marrow was involved in 216 cases. There were 69 isolated CNS relapses, 25 isolated testicular recurrences and five relapses in other extramedullary sites. Of the 315 children with relapse, 94 are still in a second complete remission 12-138 (median: 78) months after relapse. The overall probability of a second event free survival (P-2.EFS) and survival after relapse was 0.28 and 0.33 respectively. The probability of remaining in second remission at 11 years was significantly correlated to the duration of first remission (P
PubMed ID
7674994 View in PubMed
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Posterior fossa medulloblastoma in children and young adults (0-19 years): survival and performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20795
Source
Childs Nerv Syst. 1999 Sep;15(9):451-5; discussion 456
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
E. Helseth
B. Due-Tonnessen
F. Wesenberg
K. Lote
T. Lundar
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, The National Hospital, N-0027 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Childs Nerv Syst. 1999 Sep;15(9):451-5; discussion 456
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body Weight
Cerebellar Neoplasms - mortality - physiopathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Cranial Fossa, Posterior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Karnofsky Performance Status
Learning
Locomotion
Male
Medulloblastoma - mortality - physiopathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Neoplasms, Second Primary - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of this study was to present survival data and outcome status in the long-term survivors of a consecutive series of 111 children and young adults treated for posterior fossa medulloblastoma in our departments from 1960 to 1997. The total surgical mortality was 13%. The surgical mortality rate declined significantly during the time period overall, from 23% before 1970 to 0% after 1990. The 5-year survival rate for patients treated between 1960 and 1973 was 0%, while 5-year survival for patients treated after the introduction of systematic craniospinal radiation in 1974 was 53%. Thirty-four patients were alive at the close of this study, with a mean observation time of 13.5 years. Over half, 61%, of the patients had one or more major deficits/problems with respect to learning ability, power of locomotion, sociability, hobbies and relationships with the opposite sex. A younger age at the time of treatment was correlated with larger deficits/problems in these variables. The correlation between young age at the time of treatment and short final height was significant. The frequency of a second neoplasm was 14%. In all but 3 cases the major cause of permanent deficits/problems was radiation therapy.
PubMed ID
10502004 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2001 Dec;37(18):2421-5; discussion 2425-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
B G Solheim
F. Wesenberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Immunology, Rikshospitalet, The National Hospital University of Oslo, NO-0027 Oslo, Norway. bjarte.solheim@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2001 Dec;37(18):2421-5; discussion 2425-7
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Component Transfusion - methods - standards - trends
Blood Loss, Surgical - prevention & control
Child
Forecasting
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Humans
Abstract
Blood product transfusions can be life saving and must be considered in the supportive care of children of any age with underlying oncological or haematological problems, as well as after major surgery or after serious trauma. Paediatric transfusions are particularly challenging because life-long effects of transfusion complications are more durable and serious in children than in adults, in whom the median age at transfusion is >70 years (Tynell E, Norda R, Shanwell A, Björkman A. Long-term survival in transfusion recipients in Sweden, 1993. Transfusion 2001, 41, 251-255). While the general indications for transfusions in paediatric patients are similar to adults, the threshold, volumes and infusion rates for transfusions vary with age. In this Update, we discuss current blood products, then suggest transfusion "triggers" in major surgery and haematological and oncologic practice. Finally, future developments and new possibilities are considered.
PubMed ID
11720837 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.