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96 records – page 2 of 10.

Building-related symptoms and stress indicators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154949
Source
Indoor Air. 2008 Dec;18(6):440-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
A M Hansen
H W Meyer
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. aamh@ami.dk
Source
Indoor Air. 2008 Dec;18(6):440-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Sick Building Syndrome - epidemiology - psychology
Stress, Physiological - physiology
Students
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to study physiological stress indicators in relation to prevalence of building-related symptoms (BRS) among teachers employed in three selected schools in Copenhagen. Three hypotheses were studied: (i) Perceived psychosocial work environment was associated with BRS; (ii) Perceived psychosocial work environment (job strain) was associated with physiological strain; (iii) BRS was associated with physiological strain. We found a tendency among women of an association between job strain and being BRS positive. Also an association between job strain and physiological strain was observed among women. Being BRS positive was not associated with single physiological stress indicators with the exception of a higher level free testosterone in serum among BRS-positive women.
Including physiological stress indicators may be a supplementary measure to questionnaires when studying the association between the psychosocial work environment and building-related symptoms (BRS). In this study, job strain was associated with physiological strain among women. Being BRS positive was not associated with single physiological stress indicators with the exception of a higher level free testosterone in serum among BRS-positive women. This study should be regarded as a preliminary study because of its small number of participants.
PubMed ID
18823341 View in PubMed
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[Cardiovascular risk factors and subjective organ symptoms in Danish dentists].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246809
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1979 Oct;83(18):641-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1979

[Cardiovascular risk factors in snorers. The Copenhagen Male Study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11649
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Oct 18;155(42):3380-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-1993
Author
P J Jennum
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Klinisk neurofysiologisk afdeling, Hvidovre Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Oct 18;155(42):3380-4
Date
Oct-18-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Snoring - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Former studies on the association between snoring and cardiovascular disease (CVD) have only partly taken established CVD risk factors into consideration. In the Copenhagen Male Study, 3323 men aged 54-74 years were classified according to self-reported snoring habits. Eleven CVD risk factors were examined. The prevalence of snoring decreased with age, with a 50% higher frequency of snorers in the youngest quintile than in the oldest, p
PubMed ID
8259629 View in PubMed
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[Cerebral symptoms in 3,387 men and occupational exposure to organic solvents. An epidemiological study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226834
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Feb 11;153(7):493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-1991
Author
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, København, arbejdsmedicinsk klinik.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Feb 11;153(7):493-6
Date
Feb-11-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brain - drug effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Solvents - adverse effects
Abstract
In The Copenhagen Male Study, an epidemiological study comprising 3,387 men aged 53 to 75 years, 3,303 men with valid questionnaire answers to questions on occupational organic solvents exposure, four cerebral symptoms and current work status were examined. Two hundred and ninety-five men had been occupationally exposed to mixed organic solvents for a period of five years or more. Among the exposed persons, 178 had retired, while 117 were still gainfully employed. The exposed men in both groups had highly significantly more complaints of decreased concentration and defective memory. Among the exposed retired men a higher prevalence of headache was found. Among the exposed men who were still employed a trend towards a higher prevalence of vertigo was found. This study was conducted within a cardiovascular study with no focus on the relationship between organic solvent exposure and cerebral symptoms, a design reducing the risk of overreporting. If overreporting was responsible for the differences found between solvent exposed and unexposed a similar pattern for reporting of acute and chronic symptoms should be expected. This was not the case. Our results support the hypothesis, that occupational exposure to organic solvents for a period of five years or more increases the risk of developing persistent defective memory and decrease in concentration.
PubMed ID
2000660 View in PubMed
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Cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL) and cholesterol/HDL-ratio versus arterial blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245049
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1981;646:25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
E. Agner
H I Mørck
T. Brendstrup
H. Hollnagel
M. Schroll
F. Gyntelberg
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1981;646:25-30
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Cholesterol - blood
Denmark
Female
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Abstract
In a cardiovascular survey of 928 men and women aged exactly 30, 40, 50 & 60 years, a correlation between serum cholesterol, cholesterol/HDL-ratio and arterial blood pressure was found. This correlation was indirectly caused by mutual correlations to relative weight and age as a final result found after multiple rank correlation analysis in each sex. HDL was not correlated to arterial blood pressure at all.
PubMed ID
6941664 View in PubMed
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[Clinical environmental medicine. An examination of a case load from a 2-year project]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37646
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jun 18;152(25):1817-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-18-1990
Author
P. Jacobsen
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, København, arbejdsmedicinsk klinik.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jun 18;152(25):1817-9
Date
Jun-18-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Research Design
Abstract
In a two year experimental project, 38 persons were referred to clinical examination at a clinic for occupational medicine. Admission was based upon suspicion of health damage caused by environmental factors outside the occupational setting. Twentyseven persons were suspected of indoor exposure with unspecified dust as the dominating factor. In the general environment, suspected exposure from polluted soil was the main reason for admission of 11 patients. In 22 cases, a causal relation between complaints and exposure to environmental factors was considered likely and recommendations to eliminate exposure or to effectuate further investigations of exposure were made. It is concluded that there is a need for an arrangement whereby patients can be examined by doctors experienced in assessing relations between exposure from environmental factors and disease. Since only few patients are expected, the examinations can be carried out in clinics for occupational medicine within existing resources.
PubMed ID
2363217 View in PubMed
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Coffee consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease--a settled issue?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11474
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Jan;237(1):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
F. Gyntelberg
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
H. Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Copenhagen Male Study, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Jan;237(1):55-61
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Coffee - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. Based on a meta-analysis, it was recently stated that there is no association between coffee consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease. Why then, have studies on the issue shown quite variable results? DESIGN SETTING AND SUBJECTS. A prospective study was performed in the Copenhagen Male Study on 2975 men (53-74 years) without cardiovascular disease at baseline in 1985/1986. They were classified according to self-reported consumption of filter coffee. Some 147 men (5%) were coffee abstainers. Potential confounders were alcohol use, physical activity, smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, serum selenium, body mass index, blood pressure, Lewis blood group, hypertension, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and social class. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The incidence of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) 1985/86-1991. RESULTS. Some 184 men had a first IHD event. There was no significant difference between those consuming 1-4, 5-8 or > or = 9 cups per day after controlling for confounders (P-value of trend test: 0.14). The crude incidence rates were 6.8, 6.7 and 4.6%, respectively; the adjusted rates were 6.8, 6.7 and 4.0%, respectively. Coffee consumption was significantly (P
PubMed ID
7830032 View in PubMed
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Coronary risk factors and plasma sex hormones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55827
Source
Am J Med. 1982 Nov;73(5):648-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1982
Author
J. Lindholm
P. Winkel
U. Brodthagen
F. Gyntelberg
Source
Am J Med. 1982 Nov;73(5):648-51
Date
Nov-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Coronary Disease - blood
Denmark
Estradiol - blood
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - analysis
Testosterone - blood
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Recent studies have reported higher plasma estradiol levels in male survivors of acute myocardial infarction. This finding has raised the possibility that hyperestrogenemia may consitiute a separate coronary risk factor. In 443 men, aged 30, 40, 50, and 60, we assessed the relationship between plasma levels of estradiol, testosterone, and testosterone-binding globulin and coronary risk factors: fasting plasma concentrations of triglyceride, cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein, blood pressure, and smoking and leisure-time physical activity patterns. Plasma estradiol concentrations were found to correlate significantly with body weight. After adjustment for this association, we found that the mean plasma estradiol concentration still was significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers. No other correlation could be estabilished between plasma hormone levels and coronary risk factors. The relative hyperestrogenemia reported in men with previous myocardial infarction may be due to an effect of smoking but may also reflect the relationship between body weight and plasma estradiol levels. Future studies should consider the demonstrated association between plasma estrogen levels and smoking.
PubMed ID
6890309 View in PubMed
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96 records – page 2 of 10.