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Adverse effects on risk of ischaemic heart disease of adding sugar to hot beverages in hypertensives using diuretics. A six year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11267
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Righospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Coffee
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea
Abstract
Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and essential hypertension (EH) are two of several manifestations of the insulin resistance syndrome. Although subjects with NIDDM and subjects with EH share a common defect in carbohydrate metabolism, only diabetics are advised to avoid sugar. We tested the theory that an adverse effect of diuretics treatment in men with EH with respect to risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) would depend on the intake of dietary sugar using sugar in hot beverages as a marker. The cohort consisted of 2,899 men from the Copenhagen Male Study aged 53-74 years (mean 63) who were without overt cardiovascular disease. Potential confounders were: age, alcohol,smoking, physical activity, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipids, cotinine, NIDDM,and social class. A total of 340 men took antihypertensives; 211 took diuretics (95% thiazides and related agents), and 129 used other antihypertensives. During 6 years, 179 men (6.2%) had a first IHD event. Among the 340 men taking antihypertensives, the incidence rate was 11%. Diuretics use was associated with a high risk of IHD in hypertensive men with a relatively high intake of dietary sugar; the cumulative incidence rate was 22%; in diuretics treated men with a low intake of sugar, the rate was 7%. After controlling for potential confounders, relative risk (95% ci.) was 3.1(1.3-7.6), p = 001. Among the 129 men who took other forms of antihypertensive drugs, the IHD incidence rate was 8%, and independent of the intake of sugar. The results indicate that the risk of IHD in hypertensives using diuretics is associated with intake of dietary sugar, which may explain at least some of the discouraging effects of antihypertensive agents on the reduction of risk of IHD.
PubMed ID
8860097 View in PubMed
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Airborne occupational exposure, ABO phenotype and risk of ischaemic heart disease in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53657
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, H:S Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, Denmark. ps11@bbh.ohsp.dk
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):191-8
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Phenotype
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that long-term occupational exposure to airborne pollutants is a stronger risk factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in men with blood type O than in men with other ABO phenotypes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and prospective study taking into account potential confounders. SETTING: The Copenhagen Male Study. SUBJECTS: 3321 men aged 53-74 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Lifetime prevalence of myocardial infarction and incidence of IHD in an 8-year follow-up among men without overt cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Among men with phenotypes other than O no association was found between airborne pollutant exposure and IHD risk. Among men with blood type O (P = 1417, 42%), 4.7% had a history of myocardial infarction, as compared with 5.7% among men with other phenotypes (P = 1904, 58%). Long-term occupational exposure (> 5 years of exposure) to various airborne pollutants: soldering fumes, welding fumes and plastic fumes was associated with a significantly increased lifetime prevalence of myocardial infarction. Odds ratios (95% confidence limits) for these factors were 3.0 (1.6-5.8), P = 0.002, 2.1 (1.05-4.2), P = 0.05, and 8.3 (2.6-27.0), P = 0.003. In an 8-year follow-up a similar though weaker association was found with a significantly increased risk for those exposed long term to soldering fumes: 1.8 (1.0-3.2), P = 0.05. CONCLUSION: The finding of a quite strong interplay between airborne pollutants, ABO phenotypes, and risk of IHD, may open up new possibilities for clarifying the roles of the ABO blood group and air pollution as cardiovascular risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):179-8212394325
PubMed ID
12394327 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, and risk of ischaemic heart disease: six year follow up in the Copenhagen male study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11258
Source
BMJ. 1996 Mar 23;312(7033):736-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1996
Author
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Male Study, Epidemiological Research Unit, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
BMJ. 1996 Mar 23;312(7033):736-41
Date
Mar-23-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between use of alcohol, concentration of low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and risk of ischaemic heart disease. DESIGN: Prospective study with controlling for several relevant confounders, including concentrations of other lipid fractions. SETTING: Copenhagen male study, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 2826 men aged 53-74 years without overt ischaemic heart disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incidence of ischaemic heart disease during a six year follow up period. RESULTS: 172 men (6.1%) had a first ischaemic heart disease event. There was an overall inverse association between alcohol intake and risk of ischaemic heart disease. The association was highly dependent on concentration of low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In men with a high concentration (> or = 5.25 mmol/l) cumulative incidence rates of ischaemic heart disease were 16.4% for abstainers, 8.7% for those who drank 1-21 beverages a week, and 4.4% for those who drank 22 or more beverages a week. With abstainers as reference and after adjustment for confounders, corresponding relative risks (95% confidence interval) were 0.4 (0.2 to 1.0; P or = 3.63 mmol/l who abstained from drinking alcohol was 43% (10% to 64%). CONCLUSIONS: In middle aged and elderly men the inverse association between alcohol consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease is highly dependent on the concentration of low density lipoprotein cholesterol. These results support the suggestion that use of alcohol may in part explain the French paradox.
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 1996 Sep-Oct;125(2):51
Comment In: BMJ. 1996 Aug 10;313(7053):365-68760765
Erratum In: BMJ 1996 Apr 20;312(7037):1007
PubMed ID
8605458 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol consumption, S-LDL-cholesterol and risk of ischemic heart disease. 6-year follow-up in The Copenhagen Male Study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11029
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Jun 23;159(26):4110-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-23-1997
Author
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
H:S Rigshospitalet, arbejdsmedicinsk klinik, epidemiologisk forskningsenhed.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Jun 23;159(26):4110-6
Date
Jun-23-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Incidence
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A high intake of saturated fat is associated with an increase in serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) and an increase in risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). In some parts of France a high intake of fat is not associated with increased risk of IHD, an apparent discrepancy named the French paradox. It has been suggested, but never tested prospectively, that regular use of alcohol might explain this low risk. We investigated the interplay between use of alcohol, LDL and risk of IHD in a prospective study controlling for a number of relevant confounders including other lipid fraction, including 2,826 males aged 53-74 years without overt IHD. The incidence of IHD during a six year follow-up period was registered. One hundred and seventy-two men (6.1%) had a first IHD event. There was an overall inverse association between alcohol intake and risk of IHD. The association was highly dependent on LDL. In men with a high LDL (> or = 5.25 mmol/l), cumulative incidence rates of IHD were 16.4% for abstainers, 8.7% for those who drank 1-21 beverages/week and 4.4% for those who drank 22+. Using abstainers as reference, adjusted for confounders, corresponding relative risks (95% CI) were 0.4 (0.2-1.0), p or = 3.63 mmol/l who abstained from drinking alcohol was calculated; AR with 95% confidence limits was 43% (10-64%). To conclude, in middleaged and elderly men the inverse association between alcohol consumption and risk of IHD was highly dependent on the level of LDL. These results support the suggestion that alcohol intake may at least in part explain the French paradox.
PubMed ID
9229869 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol intake, Lewis phenotypes and risk of ischemic heart disease. The Copenhagen Male Study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11604
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Feb 28;156(9):1297-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1994
Author
H O Hein
H. Sørensen
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Feb 28;156(9):1297-302
Date
Feb-28-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Lewis Blood-Group System
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - genetics - mortality
Phenotype
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
In the Copenhagen Male Study we found an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in men with the Lewis phenotype Le(a-b-). This study investigated whether, within the group of Le(a-b-) men, any conventional risk factors modified their increased risk. Three thousand, three hundred and eighty-three men aged 53 to 75 years were examined in 1985/86 and their morbidity and mortality over the next four years recorded. Three hundred and forty-three men with cardiovascular diseases were excluded at baseline. Potential risk factors examined were: alcohol consumption, physical activity, tobacco smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, body mass index, blood pressure, hypertension, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and social class. In eligible men with Le(a-b-), N = 280 (9.6%), alcohol was the only risk factor associated with risk of IHD. There was a significant inverse dose-effect relationship between alcohol consumption and risk. The age-adjusted p-values of trend tests were for risk of non-fatal + fatal IHD: p = 0.03; for risk of fatal IHD: p = 0.02. In eligible men with other phenotypes, N = 2,649 (90.4%) only a limited and non-significant negative association with alcohol. In Le(a-b-) men, a group genetically at increased risk of IHD, the risk was strongly and significantly negatively correlated with alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
8009753 View in PubMed
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Coffee consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease--a settled issue?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11474
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Jan;237(1):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
F. Gyntelberg
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
H. Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Copenhagen Male Study, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Jan;237(1):55-61
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Coffee - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. Based on a meta-analysis, it was recently stated that there is no association between coffee consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease. Why then, have studies on the issue shown quite variable results? DESIGN SETTING AND SUBJECTS. A prospective study was performed in the Copenhagen Male Study on 2975 men (53-74 years) without cardiovascular disease at baseline in 1985/1986. They were classified according to self-reported consumption of filter coffee. Some 147 men (5%) were coffee abstainers. Potential confounders were alcohol use, physical activity, smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, serum selenium, body mass index, blood pressure, Lewis blood group, hypertension, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and social class. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The incidence of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) 1985/86-1991. RESULTS. Some 184 men had a first IHD event. There was no significant difference between those consuming 1-4, 5-8 or > or = 9 cups per day after controlling for confounders (P-value of trend test: 0.14). The crude incidence rates were 6.8, 6.7 and 4.6%, respectively; the adjusted rates were 6.8, 6.7 and 4.0%, respectively. Coffee consumption was significantly (P
PubMed ID
7830032 View in PubMed
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Coronary risk factors and plasma sex hormones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55827
Source
Am J Med. 1982 Nov;73(5):648-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1982
Author
J. Lindholm
P. Winkel
U. Brodthagen
F. Gyntelberg
Source
Am J Med. 1982 Nov;73(5):648-51
Date
Nov-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Coronary Disease - blood
Denmark
Estradiol - blood
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - analysis
Testosterone - blood
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Recent studies have reported higher plasma estradiol levels in male survivors of acute myocardial infarction. This finding has raised the possibility that hyperestrogenemia may consitiute a separate coronary risk factor. In 443 men, aged 30, 40, 50, and 60, we assessed the relationship between plasma levels of estradiol, testosterone, and testosterone-binding globulin and coronary risk factors: fasting plasma concentrations of triglyceride, cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein, blood pressure, and smoking and leisure-time physical activity patterns. Plasma estradiol concentrations were found to correlate significantly with body weight. After adjustment for this association, we found that the mean plasma estradiol concentration still was significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers. No other correlation could be estabilished between plasma hormone levels and coronary risk factors. The relative hyperestrogenemia reported in men with previous myocardial infarction may be due to an effect of smoking but may also reflect the relationship between body weight and plasma estradiol levels. Future studies should consider the demonstrated association between plasma estrogen levels and smoking.
PubMed ID
6890309 View in PubMed
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Dampness in buildings and health. Nordic interdisciplinary review of the scientific evidence on associations between exposure to "dampness" in buildings and health effects (NORDDAMP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15484
Source
Indoor Air. 2001 Jun;11(2):72-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
C G Bornehag
G. Blomquist
F. Gyntelberg
B. Järvholm
P. Malmberg
L. Nordvall
A. Nielsen
G. Pershagen
J. Sundell
Author Affiliation
National Testing and Research Institute, Karlstad, Sweden.
Source
Indoor Air. 2001 Jun;11(2):72-86
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Animals
Asthma - etiology
Environmental Exposure
Fatigue - etiology
Fungi
Headache - etiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology
Mites
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Risk assessment
Water
Abstract
Several epidemiological investigations concerning indoor environments have indicated that "dampness" in buildings is associated to health effects such as respiratory symptoms, asthma and allergy. The aim of the present interdisciplinary review is to evaluate this association as shown in the epidemiological literature. A literature search identified 590 peer-reviewed articles of which 61 have been the foundation for this review. The review shows that "dampness" in buildings appears to increase the risk for health effects in the airways, such as cough, wheeze and asthma. Relative risks are in the range of OR 1.4-2.2. There also seems to be an association between "dampness" and other symptoms such as tiredness, headache and airways infections. It is concluded that the evidence for a causal association between "dampness" and health effects is strong. However, the mechanisms are unknown. Several definitions of dampness have been used in the studies, but all seems to be associated with health problems. Sensitisation to mites may be one but obviously not the only mechanism. Even if the mechanisms are unknown, there is sufficient evidence to take preventive measures against dampness in buildings.
Notes
Comment In: Indoor Air. 2001 Jun;11(2):7111394013
PubMed ID
11394014 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of hearing impairment in male adult subjects at 49-69 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55816
Source
Scand Audiol. 1983;12(3):191-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
A. Parving
B. Ostri
J. Poulsen
F. Gyntelberg
Source
Scand Audiol. 1983;12(3):191-6
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
As part of a cross-sectional prevalence study aimed towards elucidation of the relationship between physical fitness and coronary heart disease, information concerning the hearing ability and hearing disorders was included into postal questionnaires. These were distributed to 5 050 male subjects at a median age of 53 years, range 45-65 years, and employed in public and private Copenhagen companies. A random sample of subjects was drawn from the respondents and subjected to audiological examination (N = 206). The prevalence of hearing impairment, based on the criterion of an audiometric pure-tone threshold averaged over 500, 1 000, 2 000 and 4 000 Hz greater than or equal to 25 dB HL, is 35 +/- 5%, which compares fairly well with the number of 44 +/- 7% complaining of subjective hearing impairment. Only 16 +/- 5% had normal hearing sensitivity, and 38 +/- 7% had permanent, noise-induced hearing impairment. The prevalence and characteristics of hearing impairment are compared with a recent English epidemiological investigation using an identical average of pure-tone thresholds as criterion for hearing impairment. Furthermore, the present results are considered in view of different criteria for hearing impairment and their relation to subjective complaints of reduced hearing ability. Based on the anamnesis, the pure-tone audiometric data and additional tests used for topical diagnostic purposes, the prevalence of various aetiologies of hearing impairment is indicated for the male age group in question.
PubMed ID
6606211 View in PubMed
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Genetic markers for chronic bronchitis and peak expiratory flow in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67783
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1993 Jun;40(3):378-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
J. Vestbo
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
H. Sørensen
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1993 Jun;40(3):378-80
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System
Aged
Blood Group Antigens
Bronchitis - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Chronic Disease
Complement C3 - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic markers
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The associations between four major blood groups, ABH secretor status, and complement C3, and chronic bronchitis and peak expiratory flow were examined in 3387 men, aged 55-74 years. Presence of chronic bronchitis was assessed using the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) questionnaire. Men with NS- in the MNS system had significantly less chronic bronchitis than others, i.e. 11.4% versus 16.0% (p
PubMed ID
8339607 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.