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Adverse effects on risk of ischaemic heart disease of adding sugar to hot beverages in hypertensives using diuretics. A six year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11267
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Righospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Coffee
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea
Abstract
Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and essential hypertension (EH) are two of several manifestations of the insulin resistance syndrome. Although subjects with NIDDM and subjects with EH share a common defect in carbohydrate metabolism, only diabetics are advised to avoid sugar. We tested the theory that an adverse effect of diuretics treatment in men with EH with respect to risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) would depend on the intake of dietary sugar using sugar in hot beverages as a marker. The cohort consisted of 2,899 men from the Copenhagen Male Study aged 53-74 years (mean 63) who were without overt cardiovascular disease. Potential confounders were: age, alcohol,smoking, physical activity, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipids, cotinine, NIDDM,and social class. A total of 340 men took antihypertensives; 211 took diuretics (95% thiazides and related agents), and 129 used other antihypertensives. During 6 years, 179 men (6.2%) had a first IHD event. Among the 340 men taking antihypertensives, the incidence rate was 11%. Diuretics use was associated with a high risk of IHD in hypertensive men with a relatively high intake of dietary sugar; the cumulative incidence rate was 22%; in diuretics treated men with a low intake of sugar, the rate was 7%. After controlling for potential confounders, relative risk (95% ci.) was 3.1(1.3-7.6), p = 001. Among the 129 men who took other forms of antihypertensive drugs, the IHD incidence rate was 8%, and independent of the intake of sugar. The results indicate that the risk of IHD in hypertensives using diuretics is associated with intake of dietary sugar, which may explain at least some of the discouraging effects of antihypertensive agents on the reduction of risk of IHD.
PubMed ID
8860097 View in PubMed
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Cross-sectional study of health effects of cryolite production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67967
Source
J Soc Occup Med. 1989;39(4):133-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
H. Friis
J. Clausen
F. Gyntelberg
Source
J Soc Occup Med. 1989;39(4):133-5
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aluminum - poisoning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dust - adverse effects
Fluoride Poisoning - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
A cross-sectional health study of 101 cryolite workers was performed, using spirometry and a questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between the index of smoking and a decrease in FEV1 (per cent). There was no significant correlation between work-related exposure and lung function. Many cryolite workers described a group of symptoms appearing after 15 to 30 min of heavy dust exposure: nausea, followed by epigastric pain with relief after spontaneous or provoked vomiting. Thirty-four (33.6 per cent) workers complained of nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea in relation to work, compared to 3.8 per cent of 1752 men participating in the Copenhagen Male Study.
PubMed ID
2622142 View in PubMed
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Determinants of long-term neuropsychological symptoms. The Danish Gulf War Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52517
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1999 Nov;46(5):423-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
P. Suadicani
T. Ishøy
B. Guldager
M. Appleyard
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, H:S Copenhagen University Hospital, København NV.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1999 Nov;46(5):423-7
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Military Personnel
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Persian Gulf Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Compared with controls, up to six years after their return, Danish Gulf War Veterans have a significantly higher prevalence of self-reported neuropsychological symptoms. Independent associations are found for concentration or memory problems, repeated fits of headache, balance disturbances or fits of dizziness, abnormal fatigue not caused by physical activity, and problems sleeping all night. We investigated whether psychosocial, physical, chemical or biological exposures were associated with these symptoms. METHODOLOGY: This study is a prevalence study using retrospective data on exposure. Some 686 subjects who had been deployed in the Persian Gulf within the period August 2 1990 until December 31 1997 were included; the control group comprised 257 subjects matched according to age, gender and profession. All participants underwent clinical and paraclinical examinations, and were interviewed by a physician based on a completed questionnaire. RESULTS: A clustering of three to five of the above symptoms were found in 21.4% of Gulf War Veterans vs. 6.2% in controls, p
PubMed ID
10605622 View in PubMed
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Exposure to cold and draught, alcohol consumption, and the NS-phenotype are associated with chronic bronchitis: an epidemiological investigation of 3387 men aged 53-75 years: the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10297
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 Mar;58(3):160-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
H W Meyer
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
H:S Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. poul.suadicani@jubiipost.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 Mar;58(3):160-4
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Cold - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Phenotype
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - immunology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study was performed to estimate the strength of association between chronic bronchitis and lifetime exposure to occupational factors, current lifestyle, and the NS-phenotype in the MNS blood group among middle aged and elderly men. METHODS: The study was carried out within the frameworks of the Copenhagen Male Study. Of 3387 men 3331 men with a mean age of 63 (range 53-75) years could be classified by prevalence of chronic bronchitis. As well as the completion of a large questionnaire on health, lifestyle, and working conditions, all participants had a thorough examination, including measurements of height and weight and blood pressure and a venous blood sample was taken for the measurement of serum cotinine and MNS typing; 16.5% of the men had the NS-phenotype. Chronic bronchitis was defined as cough and phlegm lasting 3 months or more for at least 2 years; 14.6% had chronic bronchitis. RESULTS: Smoking and smoke inhalation were the factors most strongly associated with prevalence of chronic bronchitis. There were three major new findings: (a) long term (>5 years) occupational exposure to cold and draught was associated with a significantly increased prevalence of chronic bronchitis; compared with others, and adjusted for confounders, the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was 1.4 (1.1 to 1.7), p=0.004; (b) a significant J shaped association existed between alcohol use and bronchitis, p
PubMed ID
11171928 View in PubMed
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Ischaemic heart disease incidence by social class and form of smoking: the Copenhagen Male Study--17 years' follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11877
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 May;231(5):477-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 May;231(5):477-83
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Exertion
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Social Class
Time Factors
Abstract
The Copenhagen Male Study is a prospective, cardiovascular cohort study initiated in 1970 and consisting of 5249 employed men aged 40-59 years. A total of 4710 men, who had reported their smoking habits and were free of ischaemic heart disease, had their mortality recorded over a 17-year period: 585 men suffered a first incident of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and 248 cases were fatal. There was a strong social gradient in the risk of IHD (Kendall's Tau B = 0.12, P less than 0.001). Adjusting for age, blood pressure, physical activity, body mass index and alcohol consumption in a multiple logistic regression equation, men in the lowest social class had a relative risk (95% confidence interval) of IHD of 3.6 (2.5-5.3) compared to men in the highest social class. We determined whether differences in smoking habits could explain at least some of this large increase in risk. Adjustment for the above factors and also inclusion of the form of tobacco smoked, the amount of tobacco smoked and presence or absence of inhalation, had very little effect on the estimate: the relative risk was 3.5 (2.4-5.2). There was no social gradient in age at the start of smoking. According to smoking habits, comparing social class V with social class I, the relative risk was 7.7 (2.6-22.4) in cigarette smokers, 6.0 (1.1-32.1) in pipe smokers, 3.5 (1.7-7.1) in mixed smokers, 2.25 (0.4-12.9) in cheroot smokers, 3.8 (2.4-5.9) in all smokers, 1.95 (0.8-4.6) in ex-smokers, and 4.7 (1.01-22.2) in non-smokers. In the upper social classes, 50-75% of IHD events could be ascribed to smoking, and in the lowest classes only about 20%. We conclude that the substantial social inequalities in risk of ischaemic heart disease are not accounted for by differences in smoking habits.
PubMed ID
1602285 View in PubMed
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Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1994 Sep;44(4):217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
P. Suadicani
K. Hansen
A M Fenger
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Rigshospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1994 Sep;44(4):217-21
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Steel
Abstract
The association between low back pain and occupational work loads, lifestyle factors and socio-demographic factors was examined in 469 steelplant workers (436 men, 33 women), aged 40 +/- 12 years (mean +/- SD). Fifty-one per cent had experienced low back pain during the preceding year. The strongest associations were found between recent low back pain and domestic recreational activities (> or = 3 h/week vs. 0-2 h/week), and between recent low back pain and work pace (too fast vs. adequate), with odds ratios (95% confidence limits) of 3.0 (1.5-5.8) and 2.3 (1.2-4.2), respectively. We considered a subject to have a particularly severe history of low back pain if, due to low back trouble, he (i) had ever been admitted to a hospital, (ii) had ever had to change work, or (iii) had had more than one week's accumulated sick leave during the preceding year. There was a strong association between a severe low back pain history and lifetime occupational exposure to heavy and frequent lifting at work. Forty-seven per cent of severe low back pain events could be ascribed to heavy and frequent lifting, assuming the associations were causal. We conclude that domestic recreational activities may be an important potential confounder in studies on occupational risk factors for low back pain, and that, based on the results of this and of other studies, a case for prevention still seems to exist regarding lifting of heavy burdens in the work environment.
PubMed ID
7949066 View in PubMed
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Relationship between blood pressure and physical fitness, smoking and alcohol consumption in Copenhagen males aged 40-59.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13339
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1974 May;195(5):375-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1974

Risk factors for gastrointestinal symptoms. The Danish Gulf War Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52518
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1999 Nov;46(5):420-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
T. Ishøy
P. Suadicani
B. Guldager
M. Appleyard
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, H:S Copenhagen University Hospital, København NV.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1999 Nov;46(5):420-3
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Neuropsychological Tests
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Persian Gulf Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Veterans
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Compared with controls, up to six years after their return, Danish Gulf War Veterans have a significantly higher prevalence of self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms characterized by constant or occasional recurrent diarrhoea and frequent rumbling of the stomach within the preceding 12 months. The aim of this study was to clarify whether these symptoms could be attributed to physical, chemical or biological exposures. METHODOLOGY: Some 686 subjects who had been deployed in the Persian Gulf within the period August 2 1990 until December 31 1997 were included in a prevalence study using retrospective data on exposure; the control group comprised 257 subjects matched according to age, gender and profession. All participants underwent clinical and paraclinical examinations, and were interviewed by a physician based on a previously completed questionnaire. RESULTS: Among Gulf War Veterans the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was 9.1% vs 1.7% among controls, p
PubMed ID
10605621 View in PubMed
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Shift work, social class, and ischaemic heart disease in middle aged and elderly men; a 22 year follow up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54150
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1999 Sep;56(9):640-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
H. Bøggild
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aalborg Regional Hospital, Denmark. hb@aas.nja.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1999 Sep;56(9):640-5
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Class
Survival Analysis
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Shift work has been associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Most published studies have had potential problems with confounding by social class. This study explores shift work as a risk factor for IHD after controlling for social class. METHODS: The Copenhagen male study is a prospective cohort study established in 1970-1 comprising 5249 men aged 40-59. Information obtained included working time, social class, and risk factors for IHD. A second baseline was obtained in 1985-6. The cohort was followed up for 22 years through hospital discharge registers for IHD, and cause of death was recovered from death certificates. RESULTS: One fifth of the cohort was shift working at entry with a significantly larger proportion of shift workers in lower social classes. Risk of IHD and all cause mortality over 22 years, adjusted for age only, for age and social class, and finally for age, social class, smoking, fitness, height, weight, and sleep disturbances, did not differ between shift and day workers. The relative risk of IHD, adjusted for age and social class was 1.0 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.9-1.2). Men being shift workers in both 1971 and 1985 had the same risk as ex-shift workers in an 8 years follow up from the 1985-6 baseline. CONCLUSIONS: The present study questions shift work as an independent risk factor for IHD. The results of the study emphasise the importance of controlling adequately for the interplay of shift work and social class.
PubMed ID
10615298 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.