Skip header and navigation

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Coffee consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease--a settled issue?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11474
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Jan;237(1):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
F. Gyntelberg
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
H. Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Copenhagen Male Study, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Jan;237(1):55-61
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Coffee - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. Based on a meta-analysis, it was recently stated that there is no association between coffee consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease. Why then, have studies on the issue shown quite variable results? DESIGN SETTING AND SUBJECTS. A prospective study was performed in the Copenhagen Male Study on 2975 men (53-74 years) without cardiovascular disease at baseline in 1985/1986. They were classified according to self-reported consumption of filter coffee. Some 147 men (5%) were coffee abstainers. Potential confounders were alcohol use, physical activity, smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, serum selenium, body mass index, blood pressure, Lewis blood group, hypertension, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and social class. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The incidence of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) 1985/86-1991. RESULTS. Some 184 men had a first IHD event. There was no significant difference between those consuming 1-4, 5-8 or > or = 9 cups per day after controlling for confounders (P-value of trend test: 0.14). The crude incidence rates were 6.8, 6.7 and 4.6%, respectively; the adjusted rates were 6.8, 6.7 and 4.0%, respectively. Coffee consumption was significantly (P
PubMed ID
7830032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetic markers for peptic ulcer. A study of 3387 men aged 54 to 74 years: the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210276
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Jan;32(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Jan;32(1):16-21
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Genetic markers
Humans
Lewis Blood-Group System - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Phenotype
Prevalence
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Selection Bias
Abstract
Knowledge on the genetic risk of peptic ulcer has predominantly been based on hospital materials. To minimize selection bias, we tested the association between some genetic markers and the risk of peptic ulcer in a large-scale epidemiologic design.
Some 3387 white men aged 55-74 years were investigated and reported their history of peptic ulcer. Information about hospitalization and operation was collected from registers.
The lifetime prevalence of peptic ulcer in men with the Lewis phenotype Le(a + b-) and non-secretors of ABH antigen was 15%, significantly higher than others, 11% (P
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Gastroenterol. 1999 Feb;34(2):219-2010192205
PubMed ID
9018761 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1994 Sep;44(4):217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
P. Suadicani
K. Hansen
A M Fenger
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Rigshospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1994 Sep;44(4):217-21
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Steel
Abstract
The association between low back pain and occupational work loads, lifestyle factors and socio-demographic factors was examined in 469 steelplant workers (436 men, 33 women), aged 40 +/- 12 years (mean +/- SD). Fifty-one per cent had experienced low back pain during the preceding year. The strongest associations were found between recent low back pain and domestic recreational activities (> or = 3 h/week vs. 0-2 h/week), and between recent low back pain and work pace (too fast vs. adequate), with odds ratios (95% confidence limits) of 3.0 (1.5-5.8) and 2.3 (1.2-4.2), respectively. We considered a subject to have a particularly severe history of low back pain if, due to low back trouble, he (i) had ever been admitted to a hospital, (ii) had ever had to change work, or (iii) had had more than one week's accumulated sick leave during the preceding year. There was a strong association between a severe low back pain history and lifetime occupational exposure to heavy and frequent lifting at work. Forty-seven per cent of severe low back pain events could be ascribed to heavy and frequent lifting, assuming the associations were causal. We conclude that domestic recreational activities may be an important potential confounder in studies on occupational risk factors for low back pain, and that, based on the results of this and of other studies, a case for prevention still seems to exist regarding lifting of heavy burdens in the work environment.
PubMed ID
7949066 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mortality and morbidity of potentially misclassified smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22131
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;26(2):321-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;26(2):321-7
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Biological Markers - blood
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Cotinine - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - blood - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Misclassification of smokers as non-smokers may bias estimates of the excess morbidity and mortality associated with smoking. The issue has been given little, if any, attention in prospective epidemiological studies. This study examined characteristics of potentially misclassified smokers with respect to mortality, morbidity, and risk factors. METHOD: A prospective study (within The Copenhagen Male Study, Denmark) used serum cotinine as an objective marker of use of tobacco. A serum concentration of 100 ng/ml was regarded as a relevant threshold for active smoking. In all, 3270 males aged 53-74 years who reported their previous and current tobacco habits, including the use of chew tobacco and snuff, were included. Incidence of all causes of mortality (ACM) during 9 years and death due to ischaemic heart disease (IHD) during 8 years of follow-up were the main outcome measures. RESULTS: Overall cumulative incidence rates of ACM and IHD were 19.1% and 4.3%, respectively. Of 1405 men who reported being non-tobacco users, i.e. no current smoking and no use of chewing tobacco or snuff, 1377 had levels
PubMed ID
9169167 View in PubMed
Less detail

Socioeconomic status, ABO phenotypes and risk of ischaemic heart disease: an 8-year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47811
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2000 Aug;7(4):277-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. poul.suadicani@jubiipost.dk
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2000 Aug;7(4):277-83
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Occupations
Phenotype
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The association of socioeconomic status with the risk of ischaemic heart disease is only partly explained by the uneven distribution of conventional risk factors. We tested the hypothesis that an uneven socioeconomic distribution of ABO phenotypes could contribute to the explanation. DESIGN: A prospective study controlling for age and other relevant potential confounders: smoking, physical activity, wine consumption, height, weight, serum lipids, blood pressure, hypertension, type II diabetes, serum selenium concentration and soldering fumes exposure. SETTING: The Copenhagen Male Study, Denmark. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: Two thousand, nine hundred and ninety-three men aged 53-74 years without overt ischaemic heart disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incidence of ischaemic heart disease in an 8-year follow-up. RESULTS: Two hundred and forty-two men (8.1%) had a first ischaemic heart disease event. There was no association between socioeconomic status and the ABO blood group phenotypes and, in accordance with this, ABO phenotype was not a confounder for the association of socioeconomic status with the risk of ischaemic heart disease. However, ABO blood group was a strong risk or effect modifier. Only among men with the O phenotype was socioeconomic status (social classes IV and V versus social classes I, II and III) associated with a significant excess risk (relative risk 1.7, 95% confidence interval 1.1-2.7 and P = 0.02 after adjustment for confounders; the corresponding relative risks among the A and B/AB phenotypes comparing low social classes with the higher social classes were 1.08 (P = 0.77) and 1.08 (P = 0.89), respectively). CONCLUSION: ABO phenotypes did not contribute directly to the explanation of socioeconomic inequalities in the risk of ischaemic heart disease. However, the finding of ABO phenotypes being effect modifiers for the association of socioeconomic status with the risk of ischaemic heart disease may open up new possibilities of clarifying the roles of socioeconomic status and ABO blood group as cardiovascular disease risk factors.
PubMed ID
11006899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Strong mediators of social inequalities in risk of ischaemic heart disease: a six-year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11037
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Jun;26(3):516-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Jun;26(3):516-22
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Solvents - adverse effects
Welding - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Large social inequalities exist in risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in Western populations; inequalities which are only little accounted for by established risk factors. We wished to find out if some newly identified cardiovascular risk factors in concert with established factors might contribute further to the explanation. DESIGN AND SETTING: A 6-year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study. SUBJECTS: Some 2974 males aged 53-75 years (mean 63) without overt cardiovascular disease were included in the study. Potential confounders included were: alcohol, physical activity, smoking, serum lipids, serum cotinine, serum selenium, lifetime occupational exposure to soldering fumes and organic solvents, body mass index, blood pressure, hypertension, use of sugar in hot beverages, use of diuretics, and Lewis phenotypes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: During the 6-year follow-up period (1985/1986-1991), 184 men (6.2%) had a first IHD event. Compared to higher social classes (classes I, II and III), lower classes (classes IV and V) had a significantly (P
PubMed ID
9222776 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.