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29 records – page 1 of 3.

Antenatal care in Denmark. Assessments of program, staff competence, compliance, and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65010
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1992;8 Suppl 1:25-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
F B Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Danish National Board of Health.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1992;8 Suppl 1:25-32
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Female
Humans
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Prenatal care - organization & administration
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Antenatal care in Denmark is shared between general practitioners, midwives, and hospital departments. A minimum of 9 visits is officially recommended for all pregnant women. In 1987, 80% made 10 or more visits. An inadequate number of visits in relation to recommendations was most frequent in the lowest social group. Risk of stillbirth and neonatal death varied substantially between social groups even after taking account of number of visits made.
PubMed ID
1428641 View in PubMed
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[Cause of death patterns during the decade 1977-1986 in Denmark in lung diseases, ischemic heart disease and cardiovascular disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25524
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 May 29;151(22):1395-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-1989

[Classification of causes of perinatal and neonatal deaths in the quality evaluation of health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59727
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 27;153(22):1561-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-1991

Computer-based longitudinal recording of episodes of care in general practice using the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC). Experience from one practice. Perspectives for audit and quality assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221973
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care Suppl. 1993;1:53-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993

[Delivery of living neonates via Cesarean section in Denmark in 1987]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60004
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Nov 7;150(45):2750-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-1988
Author
L B Knudsen
F. Mac
F B Kristensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Nov 7;150(45):2750-1
Date
Nov-7-1988
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
3206679 View in PubMed
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Health technology assessment in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58731
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2000;16(2):347-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
T. Jørgensen
A. Hvenegaard
F B Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Health Services Research and Development.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2000;16(2):347-81
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Denmark
Female
Health Personnel
Health Policy
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
National health programs - organization & administration
Pregnancy
Technology Assessment, Biomedical - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Abstract
The Danish healthcare services are mainly provided by public sector institutions. The system is highly decentralized. The state has little direct influence on the provision of healthcare services. State influence is exercised through legislation and budget allocations. The main task of the state is to initiate, coordinate, and advise. Counties, which run the hospitals, also decide on the placement of services. The hospital sector is controlled within the framework of legislation and global budgets. General practitioners occupy a central position in the Danish healthcare sector, acting as gatekeepers to the rest of the system. The system works well, and its structure has resulted in steady costs of health care for a long period. There is no regulatory mechanism in the Danish health services requiring use of health technology assessment (HTA) as a basis for policy decisions, planning, or administrative procedures. However, since the late 1970s a number of comprehensive assessments of health technology have formed the basis for national health policy decisions. In 1997, after years of public criticism of the quality of hospital care and health technologies, and on the basis of a previously developed national HTA strategy, a national institute for HTA (DIHTA) was established. There seems to be a growing awareness of evidence-based healthcare among health professionals and a general acceptance of health economic analyses as a basis for health policy decision making. This progress is coupled with growing regional HTA activity in the health services. HTA seems to have a bright future in Denmark.
PubMed ID
10932413 View in PubMed
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[Home childbirth and postpartum care in Denmark 1982-1984]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65466
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Oct 12;149(42):2875-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-12-1987

[Idiopathic preterm deliveries in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59179
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Sep 23;158(39):5443-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-23-1996
Author
J. Kristensen
J. Langhoff-Roos
F B Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, København, Juliane Marie Centret, føde og gynaekologisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Sep 23;158(39):5443-6
Date
Sep-23-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The objective of the study was to characterize and quantify various demographic factors in idiopathic preterm delivery. All women with a permanent address in Denmark with singleton pregnancies who gave birth to an infant in 1982 (n = 51,851) are included. The material was obtained by a linkage of the Medical Birth Register and the National Register of Hospital Discharges, using the personal identification number. The incidence of singleton preterm delivery was 4.5% (n = 2330) of which 67% (n = 1557) were idiopathic. Neonatal mortality rates were significantly lower in idiopathic compared to indicated preterm birth. Following stepwise logistic regression analysis, maternal age below 20 (adjusted odds ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.47; p
PubMed ID
8928255 View in PubMed
Less detail

Idiopathic preterm deliveries in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59308
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Apr;85(4):549-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
J. Kristensen
J. Langhoff-Roos
F B Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital (Rigshospitalet), Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Apr;85(4):549-52
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Maternal Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Triplets
Twins
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To characterize and quantify various demographic factors in idiopathic preterm delivery. METHODS: All women with a permanent address in Denmark and a singleton pregnancy who gave birth to a preterm infant in 1982 (N = 51,851) were included. The material was obtained by a linkage of the Medical Birth Register and the National Register of Hospital Discharges, using personal identification numbers. RESULTS: The incidence of singleton preterm delivery was 4.5% (N = 2330), of which 67% (N = 1557) were idiopathic. The neonatal mortality rate was significantly lower with idiopathic than with indicated preterm birth. Following stepwise logistic regression analysis, age under 20 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-2.47; P
PubMed ID
7898831 View in PubMed
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Implications of idiopathic preterm delivery for previous and subsequent pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59252
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Nov;86(5):800-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
J. Kristensen
J. Langhoff-Roos
F B Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Nov;86(5):800-4
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy outcome
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the relationship between pregnancy complications and fetal outcome in first and second pregnancies, focusing on idiopathic and indicated preterm birth of singleton infants in either pregnancy. METHODS: Included in the study were 13,967 women in Denmark who gave birth to their first singleton infant in 1982 and a second infant in 1982-1987. Information on pregnancy and birth was obtained by linking the National Medical Birth Register and the National Register of Hospital Discharges, based on personal identification numbers. RESULTS: The risk of a preterm second birth in women with idiopathic and indicated preterm first birth did not differ significantly (15.2 and 12.8%, respectively). However, women with idiopathic preterm birth in the first pregnancy tended to repeat idiopathic preterm birth twice as often as women with indicated preterm birth repeated indicated preterm birth (11.3 versus 6.4%). Adjustment by logistic regression analysis for other risk factors for preterm birth did not influence the relative risk (6.0 before 32 weeks and 4.8 for 32-36 weeks) of a second preterm birth after a first preterm birth. Women with idiopathic preterm delivery in their first and second pregnancies gave birth to infants with lower birth weight than in previous or subsequent pregnancies. Emergency cesarean delivery in a first term pregnancy was a risk factor for subsequent idiopathic preterm birth. CONCLUSION: Idiopathic preterm birth is associated with emergency cesarean delivery at term in previous pregnancies and infants with lower birth weight in previous and subsequent pregnancies.
PubMed ID
7566852 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.