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16S rDNA sequencing of valve tissue improves microbiological diagnosis in surgically treated patients with infective endocarditis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134307
Source
J Infect. 2011 Jun;62(6):472-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Martin Vondracek
Ulrik Sartipy
Ewa Aufwerber
Inger Julander
Dan Lindblom
Katarina Westling
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital and Department of Clinical Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Infect. 2011 Jun;62(6):472-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Bacteriological Techniques - methods
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Endocarditis - diagnosis - microbiology - surgery
Female
Heart Valves - microbiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sensitivity and specificity
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to evaluate 16S rDNA sequencing in heart valves in patients with infective endocarditis undergoing surgery.
Fifty-seven patients with infective endocarditis were examined in this prospective study by analysing heart valves with 16S rDNA sequencing and culturing methods and comparing the results to blood cultures. As controls, heart valves from 61 patients without any signs of endocarditis were examined.
All together 77% of the endocarditis patients were positive for 16S rDNA, 84% had positive blood cultures and 23% had positive cultures from heart valves, whereas only 16% of the cultures from heart valves were concordant with results from blood cultures or 16S rDNA. Concordant results between 16S rDNA sequencing and blood cultures were found in 75% patients. All controls were negative for 16S rDNA. In 4 out of 9 patients with negative blood cultures, the aetiology was established by 16S rDNA alone, i.e. viridans group streptococci.
In this Swedish study, 16S rDNA sequencing of valve material was shown to be a valuable addition in blood culture-negative cases. The value of heart valve culture was low. Molecular diagnosis using 16S rDNA sequencing should be recommended in patients undergoing valve replacement for infective endocarditis.
PubMed ID
21601285 View in PubMed
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[Prevalence of healthcare-associated infections based on Swedish point-prevalence survey compared to usage of the European Center of Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) definitions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307232
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 01 21; 117:
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-21-2020
Author
Azadeh Ehyaie
Anders Johansson
Ewa Aufwerber
Anna Frej
Monica Eneslätt
Lena Lindberg
Pontus Nauclér
Author Affiliation
Patientområde Infektion, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Stockholm, Sweden Patientområde Infektion, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 01 21; 117:
Date
01-21-2020
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cross Infection
Hospitals
Humans
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose was to compare the prevalence of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) in the Swedish point prevalence survey with an assessment using the European Centre of Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) definitions of HAI. A total of 1247 patients were included from three Swedish hospitals. The prevalence of HAI was higher in the Swedish survey as compared to when using the ECDC definitions. The correspondence between results according to Swedish and ECDC protocols was better in Region Västerbotten than at Karolinska University Hospital. In Västerbotten, but not at Karolinska University Hospital, quality control was performed on collected data in the Swedish point prevalence survey. The study highlights the importance of expert knowledge of HAI and quality control to obtain valid survey results.
PubMed ID
31961443 View in PubMed
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