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Bacteriuria is associated with urge urinary incontinence in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158637
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008;26(1):35-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Nils Rodhe
Lars Englund
Sigvard Mölstad
Eva Samuelsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Sweden. nils.rodhe@ltdalarna.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008;26(1):35-9
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteriuria - complications - epidemiology - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Incontinence, Stress - epidemiology - microbiology - urine
Urinary Incontinence, Urge - epidemiology - microbiology - urine
Abstract
To investigate the association between bacteriuria and frequency and type of urinary incontinence in elderly people living in the community. Bacteriuria and urinary incontinence are common conditions and often coexisting in this population; the authors have previously reported the prevalence of bacteriuria to be 22.4% in women and 9.4% in men.
Cross-sectional study.
The catchment area of a primary healthcare centre in a Swedish middle-sized town.
Residents, except for those in nursing homes, aged 80 and over. Participation rate: 80.3% (431/537).
Urinary cultures and questionnaire data on urinary incontinence.
In women the OR for having bacteriuria increased with increasing frequency of urinary incontinence; the OR was 2.83 (95% CI 1.35-5.94) for women who were incontinent daily as compared with continent women. Reporting urge urinary incontinence increased the risk of having bacteriuria: 3.36 (95% CI 1.49-7.58) in comparison with continent women while there was no significant association between stress urinary incontinence and bacteriuria. The prevalence of bacteriuria among men was too low to make any meaningful calculations about the association between bacteriuria and frequency and type of incontinence.
Bacteriuria is associated with more frequent leakage and predominantly with urge urinary incontinence. The causes of this association and their clinical implications remain unclear. There might be some individuals who would benefit from antibiotic treatment, but further studies are warranted.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18297561 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnostic characteristics and prognoses of primary-care patients referred for clinical exercise testing: a prospective observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259916
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2014;15:71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Gunnar Nilsson
Thomas Mooe
Hans Stenlund
Eva Samuelsson
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2014;15:71
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology
Electrocardiography
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Evaluation of angina symptoms in primary care often includes clinical exercise testing. We sought to identify clinical characteristics that predicted the outcome of exercise testing and to describe the occurrence of cardiovascular events during follow-up.
This study followed patients referred to exercise testing for suspected coronary disease by general practitioners in the County of Jämtland, Sweden (enrolment, 25 months from February 2010). Patient characteristics were registered by pre-test questionnaire. Exercise tests were performed with a bicycle ergometer, a 12-lead electrocardiogram, and validated scales for scoring angina symptoms. Exercise tests were classified as positive (ST-segment depression >1 mm and chest pain indicative of angina), non-conclusive (ST depression or chest pain), or negative. Odds ratios (ORs) for exercise-test outcome were calculated with a bivariate logistic model adjusted for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, and previous cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular events (unstable angina, myocardial infarctions, decisions on revascularization, cardiovascular death, and recurrent angina in primary care) were recorded within six months. A probability cut-off of 10% was used to detect cardiovascular events in relation to the predicted test outcome.
We enrolled 865 patients (mean age 63.5 years, 50.6% men); 6.4% of patients had a positive test, 75.5% were negative, 16.4% were non-conclusive, and 1.7% were not assessable. Positive or non-conclusive test results were predicted by exertional chest pain (OR 2.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.69-3.59), a pathologic ST-T segment on resting electrocardiogram (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.44-3.63), angina according to the patient (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.13-2.55), and medication for dyslipidaemia (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.02-2.23). During follow-up, cardiovascular events occurred in 8% of all patients and 4% were referred to revascularization. Cardiovascular events occurred in 52.7%, 18.3%, and 2% of patients with positive, non-conclusive, or negative tests, respectively. The model predicted 67/69 patients with a cardiovascular event.
Clinical characteristics can be used to predict exercise test outcome. Primary care patients with a negative exercise test have a very low risk of cardiovascular events, within six months. A predictive model based on clinical characteristics can be used to refine the identification of low-risk patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24742057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incidence of venous thromboembolism in young Swedish women and possibly preventable cases among combined oral contraceptive users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63363
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Jul;83(7):674-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Eva Samuelsson
Staffan Hägg
Author Affiliation
Division of Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. eva.samuelsson@jll.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Jul;83(7):674-81
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Incidence
Interviews
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Venous Thrombosis - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We wanted to study the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE), acquired risk factors of VTE and preventable cases among users of combined oral contraceptives (COCs). METHODS: All women aged 15-44 years, (n = 24 373) living in the county of Jämtland, Sweden, between 1991 and 2000, constituted the study base in a retrospective case-reference study. Women with VTE were identified through hospital registers and interviewed by telephone. The utilization of COCs according to age was obtained from a prospective prescription database, and data from national health databases were used. RESULTS: Of 88 women with first-time VTE, 43 (49%) were COC users and 13 (15%) were pregnant. All women had at least one known risk factor, and 51 (58%) women had combinations of risk factors. The total incidence rate of VTE per 100,000 women-years for all women were 36 (29-44), for nonusers 19 (12-25) for women using third generation COCs 115 (67-184), for women using other COCs 60 (37-83), and for women during pregnancy and postpartum 103 (55-177). Of the total 244,000 women-years represented, COC users constituted 24%, pregnant women 5%, and women with other acquired risk factors 5%. The corresponding incidence rates after excluding VTE cases with other acquired risk factors were 10 (6-14), 1.2 (0.14-4.4), 64 (29-121), 27 (13-48), and 59 (24-121), per 100,000 women-years. In 11 (26%) of the COC-related VTE cases, there were relative contraindications for use of COCs or lack of thromboprophylaxis in relation to surgery. CONCLUSION. We found a very low incidence of idiopathic VTE among young non-OC users. The incidence of VTE during pregnancy was only slightly higher than during COC use. It was considered that a significant part of COC-related VTE might have been avoided.
PubMed ID
15225194 View in PubMed
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Internet-based treatment of stress urinary incontinence: 1- and 2-year results of a randomized controlled trial with a focus on pelvic floor muscle training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270264
Source
BJU Int. 2015 Dec;116(6):955-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Malin Sjöström
Göran Umefjord
Hans Stenlund
Per Carlbring
Gerhard Andersson
Eva Samuelsson
Source
BJU Int. 2015 Dec;116(6):955-64
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internet
Middle Aged
Pelvic Floor - physiopathology
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence, Stress - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the long-term effects of two non-face-to-face treatment programmes for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) based on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT).
The present study was a randomized controlled trial with online recruitment of 250 community-dwelling women aged 18-70 years with SUI = one time/week. Diagnosis was based on validated self-assessed questionnaires, 2-day bladder diary and telephone interview with a urotherapist. Consecutive computer-generated block randomization was carried out with allocation by an independent administrator to 3 months of treatment with either an internet-based treatment programme (n = 124) or a programme sent by post (n = 126). Both interventions focused mainly on PFMT. The internet group received continuous e-mail support from a urotherapist, whereas the postal group trained on their own. Follow-up was performed after 1 and 2 years via self-assessed postal questionnaires. The primary outcomes were symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]). Secondary outcomes were the Patient Global Impression of Improvement, health-specific quality of life (EQ-visual analogue scale [EQ-VAS]), use of incontinence aids, and satisfaction with treatment. There was no face-to-face contact with the participants at any time. Analysis was based on intention-to-treat.
We lost 32.4% (81/250) of participants to follow-up after 1 year and 38.0% (95/250) after 2 years. With both interventions, we observed highly significant (P 0.8) for symptoms and condition-specific quality of life (QoL) after 1 and 2 years, respectively. No significant differences were found between the groups. The mean (sd) changes in symptom score were 3.7 (3.3) for the internet group and 3.2 (3.4) for the postal group (P = 0.47) after 1 year, and 3.6 (3.5) for the internet group and 3.4 (3.3) for the postal group (P = 0.79) after 2 years. The mean changes (sd) in condition-specific QoL were 5.5 (6.5) for the internet group and 4.7 the for postal group (6.5) (P = 0.55) after 1 year, and 6.4 (6.0) for the internet group and 4.8 (7.6) for the postal group (P = 0.28) after 2 years. The proportions of participants perceiving they were much or very much improved were similar in both intervention groups after 1 year (internet, 31.9% [28/88]; postal, 33.8% [27/80], P = 0.82), but after 2 years significantly more participants in the internet group reported this degree of improvement (39.2% [29/74] vs 23.8% [19/80], P = 0.03). Health-specific QoL improved significantly in the internet group after 2 years (mean change in EQ-VAS, 3.8 [11.4], P = 0.005). We found no other significant improvements in this measure. At 1 year after treatment, 69.8% (60/86) of participants in the internet group and 60.5% (46/76) of participants in the postal group reported that they were still satisfied with the treatment result. After 2 years, the proportions were 64.9% (48/74) and 58.2% (46/79), respectively.
Non-face-to-face treatment of SUI with PFMT provides significant and clinically relevant improvements in symptoms and condition-specific QoL at 1 and 2 years after treatment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25683075 View in PubMed
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Large outbreak of Cryptosporidium hominis infection transmitted through the public water supply, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258924
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Apr;20(4):581-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Micael Widerström
Caroline Schönning
Mikael Lilja
Marianne Lebbad
Thomas Ljung
Görel Allestam
Martin Ferm
Britta Björkholm
Anette Hansen
Jari Hiltula
Jonas Långmark
Margareta Löfdahl
Maria Omberg
Christina Reuterwall
Eva Samuelsson
Katarina Widgren
Anders Wallensten
Johan Lindh
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Apr;20(4):581-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Cryptosporidium - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Water
Water Microbiology
Water Purification - methods
Water supply
Young Adult
Abstract
In November 2010, ˜27,000 (˜45%) inhabitants of Östersund, Sweden, were affected by a waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis. The outbreak was characterized by a rapid onset and high attack rate, especially among young and middle-aged persons. Young age, number of infected family members, amount of water consumed daily, and gluten intolerance were identified as risk factors for acquiring cryptosporidiosis. Also, chronic intestinal disease and young age were significantly associated with prolonged diarrhea. Identification of Cryptosporidium hominis subtype IbA10G2 in human and environmental samples and consistently low numbers of oocysts in drinking water confirmed insufficient reduction of parasites by the municipal water treatment plant. The current outbreak shows that use of inadequate microbial barriers at water treatment plants can have serious consequences for public health. This risk can be minimized by optimizing control of raw water quality and employing multiple barriers that remove or inactivate all groups of pathogens.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24655474 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low use of statins for secondary prevention in primary care: a survey in a northern Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287053
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2016 Aug 11;17(1):110
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-2016
Author
Gunnar Nilsson
Eva Samuelsson
Lars Söderström
Thomas Mooe
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2016 Aug 11;17(1):110
Date
Aug-11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
General Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Secondary Prevention - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Cholesterol-lowering therapy with statins is recommended in established cardiovascular disease (CVD) and should be considered for patients at high cardiovascular risk. We surveyed statin treatment before first-time myocardial infarction in clinical practice compared to current guidelines, in patients with and without known CVD in primary care clinics with general practitioners (GPs) on short-term contracts vs. permanent staff GPs.
A total of 931 patients (345 women) in northern Sweden were enrolled in the study between November 2009 and December 2014 and stratified by prior CVD, comprising angina pectoris, revascularisation, ischaemic stroke or transitory ischaemic attack, or peripheral artery disease. Primary care clinics were classified by the proportion of GP salaries that were paid to GPs working on short-term contracts: low (0-9 %), medium (10-39 %), or high (=40 %). We used logistic regression to identify determinants of statin treatment.
Among patients with prior CVD, only 34.5 % received statin treatment before myocardial infarction. The probability of statin treatment decreased with age (=70 years OR 0.30; 95 % CI 0.13-0.66) and female gender (OR 0.39; 95 % CI 0.20-0.78) but increased in patients with diabetes (OR 3.52; 95 % CI 1.75-7.08). Among patients with prior CVD, the type of primary care clinic was not predictive of statin treatment. In the entire study cohort, 17.3 % of patients were treated with statins; women?
Notes
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PubMed ID
27515746 View in PubMed
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Mortality from venous thromboembolism in young Swedish women and its relation to pregnancy and use of oral contraceptives--an approach to specifying rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16816
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(6):509-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Eva Samuelsson
Karin Hedenmalm
Ingemar Persson
Author Affiliation
Division of Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. eva.samuelsson@jll.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(6):509-16
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Autopsy
Cause of Death
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Death Certificates
Female
Hospital records
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - chemically induced - mortality
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism - chemically induced - diagnosis - mortality
Venous Thrombosis - chemically induced - diagnosis - mortality
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pregnancy and use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are major risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in young women and we wanted to obtain accurate VTE mortality data overall, by age, associated with the use of COCs and pregnancy. METHODS: From the Swedish Cause of Death Register (CDR) we identified women aged 15-44 with VTE as underlying or contributory cause of death during the period 1990-1999. We scrutinized medical records and included verified VTE cases without active cancer or terminal disease. Pregnancy statistics and COC utilization data were obtained from national databases. RESULTS: Of the 120 cases included, 9 (8%) were associated with pregnancy and 28 (23%) with current COC use. The overall refined VTE mortality rate in current COC users was 7.5[4.7; 10.3] per million user-years and the corresponding pregnancy-related rate was 8.9[4.1;17.0] per million pregnancy years, rates increasing with age. For ages 15-24, the rate was significantly higher in current COC users than in non-pregnant women not using COCs: 6.0[3.1; 10.5] per million user-years vs. 0.3[0.0; 1.2] per million woman years. Underlying cause mortality data included 82% of VTE deaths associated with COCs, and 56% of maternal deaths had a pregnancy-related code. CONCLUSION: Mortality figures from VTE associated with the use of COCs and pregnancy were similar. COC use had an important impact on the total VTE mortality in the youngest age group. Standard mortality statistics do not allow accurate monitoring of VTE mortality in young women due to missing data, misdiagnoses and coding rules.
PubMed ID
16121760 View in PubMed
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"My greatest dream is to be normal": the impact of gender on the depression narratives of young Swedish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138675
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 May;21(5):612-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Ulla E Danielsson
Carita Bengs
Eva Samuelsson
Eva E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ulla.danielsson@fammed.umu.se
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 May;21(5):612-24
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Emotions
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interview, Psychological
Male
Narration
Primary Health Care
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological
Sweden - epidemiology
Tape Recording
Young Adult
Abstract
Depression is common among young people. Gender differences in diagnosing depression appear during adolescence. The study aim was to explore the impact of gender on depression in young Swedish men and women. Grounded theory was used to analyze interviews with 23 young people aged 17 to 25 years who had been diagnosed with depression. Their narratives were marked by a striving to be normal and disclosed strong gender stereotypes, constructed in interaction with parents, friends, and the media. Gender norms were upheld by feelings of shame, and restricted the acting space of our informants. However, we also found transgressions of these gender norms. Primary health care workers could encourage young men to open up emotionally and communicate their personal distress, and young women to be daring and assertive of their own strengths, so that both genders might gain access to the positive coping strategies practiced respectively by each.
PubMed ID
21149850 View in PubMed
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Pre-hospital delay in patients with first time myocardial infarction: an observational study in a northern Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278027
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016 May 12;16:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-2016
Author
Gunnar Nilsson
Thomas Mooe
Lars Söderström
Eva Samuelsson
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016 May 12;16:93
Date
May-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery of Health Care
Emergency Medical Dispatch
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Admission
Primary Health Care
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Telephone
Time Factors
Time-to-Treatment
Transportation of Patients
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In myocardial infarction (MI), pre-hospital delay is associated with increased mortality and decreased possibility of revascularisation. We assessed pre-hospital delay in patients with first time MI in a northern Swedish population and identified determinants of a pre-hospital delay = 2 h.
A total of 89 women (mean age 72.6 years) and 176 men (mean age 65.8 years) from a secondary prevention study were enrolled in an observational study after first time MI between November 2009 and March 2012. Total pre-hospital delay was defined as the time from the onset of symptoms suggestive of MI to admission to the hospital. Decision time was defined as the time from the onset of symptoms until the call to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). The time of symptom onset was assessed during the episode of care, and the time of call to EMS and admission to the hospital was based on recorded data. The first medical contact was determined from a mailed questionnaire. Determinants associated with pre-hospital delay = 2 h were identified by multivariable logistic regression.
The median total pre-hospital delay was 5.1 h (IQR 18.1), decision time 3.1 h (IQR 10.4), and transport time 1.2 h (IQR 1.0). The first medical contact was to primary care in 52.3 % of cases (22.3 % as a visit to a general practitioner and 30 % by telephone counselling), 37.3 % called the EMS, and 10.4 % self-referred to the hospital. Determinants of a pre-hospital delay = 2 h were a visit to a general practitioner (OR 10.77, 95 % CI 2.39-48.59), call to primary care telephone counselling (OR 3.82, 95 % CI 1.68-8.68), chest pain as the predominant presenting symptom (OR 0.24, 95 % CI 0.08-0.77), and distance from the hospital (OR 1.03, 95 % CI 1.02-1.04). Among patients with primary care as the first medical contact, 67.0 % had a decision time = 2 h, compared to 44.7 % of patients who called EMS or self-referred (p = 0.002).
Pre-hospital delay in patients with first time MI is prolonged considerably, particularly when primary care is the first medical contact. Actions to shorten decision time and increase the use of EMS are still necessary.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27176816 View in PubMed
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