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The association between cold extremes and neonatal mortality in Swedish Sápmi from 1800 to 1895.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301300
Source
Glob Health Action. 2019; 12(1):1623609
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2019
Author
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
a Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR) , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2019; 12(1):1623609
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Background: Studies in which the association between temperature and neonatal mortality (deaths during the first 28 days of life) is tracked over extended periods that cover demographic, economic and epidemiological transitions are quite limited. From previous research about the demographic transition in Swedish Sápmi, we know that infant and child mortality was generally higher among the indigenous (Sami) population compared to non-indigenous populations. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between extreme temperatures and neonatal mortality among the Sami and non-Sami population in Swedish Sápmi (Lapland) during the nineteenth century. Methods: Data from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, were used to identify neonatal deaths. We used monthly mean temperature in Tornedalen and identified cold and warm month (5th and 95th) percentiles. Monthly death counts from extreme temperatures were modelled using negative binomial regression. We computed relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for time trends and seasonality. Results: Overall, the neonatal mortality rate was higher among Sami compared to non-Sami infants (62/1,000 vs 35/1,000 live births), although the differences between the two populations decreased after 1860. For the Sami population prior 1860, the results revealed a higher neonatal incidence rate during cold winter months (
PubMed ID
31232229 View in PubMed
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Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880-1950.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304298
Source
Environ Res. 2021 Jan; 192:110400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2021
Author
Johan Junkka
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Res. 2021 Jan; 192:110400
Date
Jan-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In resource-poor societies, neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life) is usually very high. Young infants are particularly vulnerable to environmental health risks, which are modified by socioeconomic factors that change over time. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and neonatal mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition.
Parish register data and temperature data in coastal Västerbotten, Sweden, between 1880 and 1950 were used. Total and sex-specific neonatal mortality was modelled as a function of mean temperature, adjusting for age, seasonality and calendar time, using discrete-time survival analysis. A linear threshold function was applied with a cut point at 14.5 °C (the minimum mortality temperature). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Further analyses were stratified by study period (1800-1899, 1900-1929, and 1930-1950).
Neonatal mortality was 32.1 deaths/1000 live births, higher in boys than in girls, and decreased between 1880 and 1950, with high inter-annual variability. Mean daily temperature was +2.5 °C, ranging from -40.9 °C to +28.8 °C. At -20 °C, the OR of neonatal death was 1.56 (CI 1.30-1.87) compared to the reference at +14.5 °C. Among girls, the OR of mortality at -20 °C was 1.17 (0.88-1.54), and among boys, it was 1.94 (1.53-2.45). A temperature increase from +14.5 to +20 °C was associated with a 25% increase of neonatal mortality (OR 1.25, CI 1.04-1.50). Heat- and cold-related risks were lowest between 1900 and 1929.
In this remote sub-Arctic region undergoing socio-economic changes, we found an increased mortality risk in neonates related to low but also to high temperature. Climate vulnerability varied across time and was particularly high among boys. This demonstrates that environmental impacts on human health are complex and highly dependent on the specific local context, with many, often unknown, contributing determinants of vulnerability.
PubMed ID
33129863 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880-1950.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311776
Source
Environ Res. 2021 01; 192:110400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2021
Author
Johan Junkka
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Res. 2021 01; 192:110400
Date
01-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Climate
Female
Hot Temperature
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mortality
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperature
Abstract
In resource-poor societies, neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life) is usually very high. Young infants are particularly vulnerable to environmental health risks, which are modified by socioeconomic factors that change over time. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and neonatal mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition.
Parish register data and temperature data in coastal Västerbotten, Sweden, between 1880 and 1950 were used. Total and sex-specific neonatal mortality was modelled as a function of mean temperature, adjusting for age, seasonality and calendar time, using discrete-time survival analysis. A linear threshold function was applied with a cut point at 14.5 °C (the minimum mortality temperature). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Further analyses were stratified by study period (1800-1899, 1900-1929, and 1930-1950).
Neonatal mortality was 32.1 deaths/1000 live births, higher in boys than in girls, and decreased between 1880 and 1950, with high inter-annual variability. Mean daily temperature was +2.5 °C, ranging from -40.9 °C to +28.8 °C. At -20 °C, the OR of neonatal death was 1.56 (CI 1.30-1.87) compared to the reference at +14.5 °C. Among girls, the OR of mortality at -20 °C was 1.17 (0.88-1.54), and among boys, it was 1.94 (1.53-2.45). A temperature increase from +14.5 to +20 °C was associated with a 25% increase of neonatal mortality (OR 1.25, CI 1.04-1.50). Heat- and cold-related risks were lowest between 1900 and 1929.
In this remote sub-Arctic region undergoing socio-economic changes, we found an increased mortality risk in neonates related to low but also to high temperature. Climate vulnerability varied across time and was particularly high among boys. This demonstrates that environmental impacts on human health are complex and highly dependent on the specific local context, with many, often unknown, contributing determinants of vulnerability.
PubMed ID
33129863 View in PubMed
Less detail