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Additive effects of the major risk alleles of IRF5 and STAT4 in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90739
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Nordmark G.
Kristjansdottir G.
Theander E.
Eriksson P.
Brun J G
Wang C.
Padyukov L.
Truedsson L.
Alm G.
Eloranta M-L
Jonsson R.
Rönnblom L.
Syvänen A-C
Author Affiliation
Section of Rheumatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Gunnel.Nordmark@medsci.uu.se
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gene Frequency
Haplotypes
Heterozygote
Humans
Interferon Regulatory Factors - genetics - immunology
Linear Models
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Probability
Risk factors
STAT4 Transcription Factor - genetics - immunology
Sjogren's Syndrome - genetics - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
Primary Sj?gren's syndrome (SS) shares many features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we investigated the association of the three major polymorphisms in IRF5 and STAT4 found to be associated with SLE, in patients from Sweden and Norway with primary SS. These polymorphisms are a 5-bp CGGGG indel in the promoter of IRF5, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10488631 downstream of IRF5 and the STAT4 SNP rs7582694, which tags the major risk haplotype of STAT4. We observed strong signals for association between all three polymorphisms and primary SS, with odds ratios (ORs) >1.4 and P-values
PubMed ID
19092842 View in PubMed
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Improved outcome in Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis? A retrospective analysis of 95 cases in two cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90455
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Apr;265(4):496-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Eriksson P.
Jacobsson L.
Lindell A.
Nilsson J-A
Skogh T.
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. per.eriksson@lio.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Apr;265(4):496-506
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Cyclophosphamide - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Incidence
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vasculitis - drug therapy - mortality
Wegener Granulomatosis - drug therapy - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Mortality rates for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) have decreased after the introduction of cyclophosphamide. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) expresses the overall mortality of patients compared with the general population. The aims of this study were to compare survival in an old and a recent cohort of patients with WG and MPA using SMR and to determine predictors for death in both groups combined. DESIGN: Survival analyses were performed by Kaplan-Meier survival curves, SMR and proportional hazards regression models. SETTING: The nephrology and rheumatology clinics at Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. SUBJECTS: All patients diagnosed with WG or MPA in the catchment area during 1978-2005 were divided into two cohorts; patients diagnosed before (n=32, old cohort) and after (n=63, recent cohort) December 31, 1996. RESULTS: The two cohorts differed regarding the proportion of WG (75% vs. 56%, P=0.03) and a tendency for more pronounced kidney involvement in the old cohort: 266 micromol L(-1) (16% dialysis-dependent) vs. 192 micromol L(-1) (5% dialysis-dependent), but were comparable regarding disease severity. SMR at 1 and 5 years were 2.1 (95% CI: 0.43-6.09) and 1.6 (95% CI: 0.6-3.2) in the recent cohort and 5.2 (95% CI: 1.07-15.14) and 2.5 (95% CI: 0.93-5.52) in the old cohort. Five-year survival was 87% and 81%. Serum creatinine, age, end-stage renal disease, diagnosis before 1997 and first relapse were independent predictors for death. CONCLUSION: Patient survival in WG and MPA analysed with SMR may be better than previously believed. Severe renal disease and disease relapse were the major predictors of reduced survival.
PubMed ID
19141094 View in PubMed
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Mortality in acute type A aortic dissection: validation of the Penn classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131993
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2011 Oct;92(4):1376-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Olsson C
Hillebrant C-G
Liska J
Lockowandt U
Eriksson P
Franco-Cereceda A
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. christian.olsson@ki.se
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2011 Oct;92(4):1376-82
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aneurysm, Dissecting - classification - mortality - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic - classification - mortality - surgery
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Intraoperative Period
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Period
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Vascular Surgical Procedures - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
Intraoperative and in-hospital mortality after surgery for acute type A dissection depends largely on preoperative conditions, specifically the presence of localized or generalized ischemia. Recently, the Penn classification of patients with acute type A aortic dissection has been described. The primary aim was to validate the Penn classification and to investigate preoperative variables related to mortality.
All consecutive patients operated for acute type A aortic dissection, 1990 to 2009 (n = 360), were included in a retrospective observational study. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to identify variables related to intraoperative and in-hospital mortality. Propensity scoring was used to adjust for treatment selection bias.
Overall intraoperative mortality was 7% (24 of 360) and in-hospital mortality was 19% (69 of 360). Two hundred nineteen patients (61%) were Penn class Aa (14% in-hospital mortality), 51 (14%) class Ab (24% mortality), 63 (18%) class Ac (24% mortality), and 27 (8%) class Abc (44% mortality), p =0.007. In multivariable analysis, Penn class Ac and Abc were independently related to intraoperative death (odds ratio 5.0 and 5.4, respectively), and Penn class Abc and non-Aa were independently related to in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 3.4 and 2.3, respectively). Concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, older age, DeBakey type I dissection, and prolonged periods of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest were also independently associated with mortality.
The Penn classification of acute type A aortic dissection is purposeful and its continued usage encouraged. Penn class indicating localized or generalized ischemia is independently related to intraoperative and in-hospital mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Thorac Surg. 2012 Oct;94(4):137623006709
Comment In: Ann Thorac Surg. 2011 Oct;92(4):1382-321958784
PubMed ID
21855849 View in PubMed
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