Skip header and navigation

Refine By

16 records – page 1 of 2.

The Applicability of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program Among Older People With Dementia Living in Nursing Homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292035
Source
J Geriatr Phys Ther. 2018 May 25; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-25-2018
Author
Anna Sondell
Erik Rosendahl
Yngve Gustafson
Nina Lindelöf
Håkan Littbrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Geriatr Phys Ther. 2018 May 25; :
Date
May-25-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Exercise programs for people with dementia need to be optimized. We therefore evaluated the applicability of a high-intensity functional exercise program among people with dementia in nursing homes with regard to attendance, achieved exercise intensity, adverse events, a focus on dementia type, and whether symptoms of dementia or other medical conditions common in this population were associated with program applicability.
The Umeå Dementia and Exercise study, a cluster-randomized controlled trial set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden. Ninety-three people with dementia (mean [SD] Mini-Mental State Examination score of 15.4 [3.4]) were randomized to the exercise intervention. Thirty-four participants had Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 59 non-Alzheimer's dementia (non-AD). High-Intensity Functional Exercise (HIFE) program was conducted in groups of 3 to 8 participants. Two physiotherapists led 5 sessions (45 minutes each) per fortnight for 4 months (total 40 sessions).
Median attendance rate was 82.5%. Lower limb strength exercises were performed at high or medium intensity at a median interquartile range of 94.7% (77.8%-100%) of attended sessions. Participants with non-AD performed more sessions with high intensity in strength exercises than participants with AD (median interquartile range, 53.8% [25.7%-80%] vs 34.9% [2.02%-62.9%]; P = .035). Balance exercises were performed at high intensity at a median interquartile range of 75% (33.3%-88.6%). Adverse events (all minor and temporary, mostly musculoskeletal) occurred during the exercise sessions in 16% of attended sessions. Low motivation was the most common barrier for attendance. Buildup period, low motivation, and pain were common barriers for achieving high intensity in balance and strength exercises, and fear was a barrier in balance exercises. Of medical conditions, only behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including apathy, were negatively associated with applicability.
A group-based, supervised, and individualized high-intensity functional exercise program seems to be applicable with regard to attendance, achieved intensity, and adverse events during the exercise sessions, in people with mild to moderate dementia in nursing homes. Effective strategies to enhance motivation to participate in exercise, as well as prevention and treatment of pain and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, are important when promoting exercise participation in this population.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.
PubMed ID
29851748 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme to prevent falls in older community-dwelling adults: study protocol for the Safe Step randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305874
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 05 17; 10(5):e036194
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-17-2020
Author
Beatrice Pettersson
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Dawn A Skelton
Per Liv
Magnus Zingmark
Erik Rosendahl
Marlene Sandlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden beatrice.pettersson@umu.se.
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 05 17; 10(5):e036194
Date
05-17-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Exercise interventions have a strong evidence base for falls prevention. However, exercise can be challenging to implement and often has limited reach and poor adherence. Digital technology provides opportunities for both increased access to the intervention and support over time. Further knowledge needs to be gained regarding the effectiveness of completely self-managed digital exercise interventions. The main objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme, Safe Step, in combination with monthly educational videos with educational videos alone, on falls over 1?year in older community-dwelling adults.
A two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial will be conducted with at least 1400 community-living older adults (70+ years) who experience impaired balance. Participants will be recruited throughout Sweden with enrolment through the project website. They will be randomly allocated to either the Safe Step exercise programme with additional monthly educational videos about healthy ageing and fall prevention, or the monthly education videos alone. Participants receiving the exercise intervention will be asked to exercise at home for at least 30?min, 3 times/week with support of the Safe Step application. The primary outcome will be rate of falls (fall per person year). Participants will keep a fall calendar and report falls at the end of each month through a digital questionnaire. Further assessments of secondary outcomes will be made through self-reported questionnaires and a self-test of 30?s chair stand test at baseline and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after study start. Data will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle.
Ethical approval was obtained by The Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå (Dnr 2018/433-31). Findings will be disseminated through the project web-site, peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences and through senior citizen organisations' newsletters.
NCT03963570.
PubMed ID
32423936 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme to prevent falls in older community-dwelling adults: study protocol for the Safe Step randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311813
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 05 17; 10(5):e036194
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-17-2020
Author
Beatrice Pettersson
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Dawn A Skelton
Per Liv
Magnus Zingmark
Erik Rosendahl
Marlene Sandlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden beatrice.pettersson@umu.se.
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 05 17; 10(5):e036194
Date
05-17-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Fear
Humans
Independent living
Postural Balance
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
Exercise interventions have a strong evidence base for falls prevention. However, exercise can be challenging to implement and often has limited reach and poor adherence. Digital technology provides opportunities for both increased access to the intervention and support over time. Further knowledge needs to be gained regarding the effectiveness of completely self-managed digital exercise interventions. The main objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of a self-managed digital exercise programme, Safe Step, in combination with monthly educational videos with educational videos alone, on falls over 1?year in older community-dwelling adults.
A two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial will be conducted with at least 1400 community-living older adults (70+ years) who experience impaired balance. Participants will be recruited throughout Sweden with enrolment through the project website. They will be randomly allocated to either the Safe Step exercise programme with additional monthly educational videos about healthy ageing and fall prevention, or the monthly education videos alone. Participants receiving the exercise intervention will be asked to exercise at home for at least 30?min, 3 times/week with support of the Safe Step application. The primary outcome will be rate of falls (fall per person year). Participants will keep a fall calendar and report falls at the end of each month through a digital questionnaire. Further assessments of secondary outcomes will be made through self-reported questionnaires and a self-test of 30?s chair stand test at baseline and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after study start. Data will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle.
Ethical approval was obtained by The Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå (Dnr 2018/433-31). Findings will be disseminated through the project web-site, peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences and through senior citizen organisations' newsletters.
NCT03963570.
PubMed ID
32423936 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a high-intensity functional exercise programme on depressive symptoms and psychological well-being among older people living in residential care facilities: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143363
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2010 Jul;14(5):565-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Mia Conradsson
Håkan Littbrand
Nina Lindelof
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. mia.conradsson@germed.umu.se
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2010 Jul;14(5):565-76
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dependency (Psychology)
Depression - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Residential Facilities
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of a high-intensity functional exercise programme on depressive symptoms and psychological well-being among older people dependent in activities of daily living (ADL) and living in residential care facilities.
Cluster-randomized controlled study. Participants were 191 older people, aged 65-100, dependent in ADL and with Mini Mental State Examination scores between 10 and 30. One-hundred (52%) of the participants had a diagnosed dementia disorder. A high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise programme and a control activity were performed in groups. Sessions were held five times over each two week period for three months, a total of 29 times. The outcome measures, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) were blindly assessed at baseline, three and six months.
At baseline, mean +/- SD (range) for GDS was 4.4 +/- 3.2 (0-14), and for PGCMS 11.0 +/- 3.5 (2-17). There were no significant differences in GDS or PGCMS between the exercise and the control group at the three and six month follow-ups in the total sample. Among people with dementia, there was a between-group difference at three months in PGCMS scores in favour of the exercise group.
A high-intensity functional exercise programme seems generally not to influence depressive symptoms or psychological well-being among older people dependent in ADL and living in residential care facilities. An individualized and multifactorial intervention may be needed in this group. However, an exercise programme as a single intervention may have a short-term effect on well-being among people with dementia.
PubMed ID
20496181 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Dependence in Activities of Daily Living and Balance in Older Adults with Dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269359
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Annika Toots
Håkan Littbrand
Nina Lindelöf
Robert Wiklund
Henrik Holmberg
Peter Nordström
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-64
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To investigate the effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on independence in activities of  daily living (ADLs) and balance in older people with dementia and whether exercise effects differed between dementia types.
Cluster-randomized controlled trial: Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study.
Residential care facilities, Umeå, Sweden.
Individuals aged 65 and older with a dementia diagnosis, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10 or greater, and dependence in ADLs (N = 186).
Ninety-three participants each were allocated to the high-intensity functional exercise program, comprising lower limb strength and balance exercises, and 93 to a seated control activity.
Blinded assessors measured ADL independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Barthel Index (BI) and balance using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) at baseline and 4 (directly after intervention completion) and 7 months.
Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect on ADL independence at 4 (FIM=1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=-1.6-4.3; BI=0.6, 95% CI=-0.2-1.4) or 7 (FIM=0.8, 95% CI=-2.2-3.8; BI=0.6, 95% CI=-0.3-1.4) months. A significant between-group effect on balance favoring exercise was observed at 4 months (BBS=4.2, 95% CI=1.8-6.6). In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between dementia types. Positive between-group exercise effects were found in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia according to the FIM at 7 months and BI and BBS at 4 and 7 months.
In older people with mild to moderate dementia living in residential care facilities, a 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program appears to slow decline in ADL independence and improve balance, albeit only in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia.
PubMed ID
26782852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291732
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 60(1):323-332
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
2017
Author
Annika Toots
Håkan Littbrand
Gustaf Boström
Carl Hörnsten
Henrik Holmberg
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Nina Lindelöf
Peter Nordström
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 60(1):323-332
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - etiology - rehabilitation
Dementia - complications
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Neuropsychological Tests
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
Although physical exercise has been suggested to influence cognitive function, previous exercise studies show inconsistent results in people with dementia.
To investigate effects of exercise on cognitive function in people with dementia.
The Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study, a cluster-randomized controlled trial, was set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden. One hundred-and-forty-one women and 45 men with dementia; mean age of 85 y and mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 15, were randomized to a High-Intensity Functional Exercise program or a seated attention control activity. Blinded assessors measured global cognitive function using the MMSE and the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), and executive function using Verbal fluency (VF) at baseline and 4 months (directly after intervention completion), and MMSE and VF at 7 months.
Linear mixed models showed no between-group effects in mean difference from baseline (95% confidence intervals, CI) at 4 months in MMSE (-0.27; 95% CI -1.4 to 0.87, p?=?0.644), ADAS-Cog (-1.04, 95% CI -4 to 1.92, p?=?0.491), or VF (-0.53, 95% CI -1.42 to 0.35, p?=?0.241) or at 7 months in MMSE (-1.15, 95% CI -2.32 to 0.03, p?=?0.056) or VF (-0.18, 95% CI -1.09 to 0.74, p?=?0.707).
A 4-month, high-intensity functional exercise program had no superior effects on global cognition or executive function in people with dementia living in nursing homes when compared with an attention control activity.
Notes
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Apr;64(4):731-8 PMID 27037872
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010;29(2):109-14 PMID 20150731
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 1998 Jul;53(4):S209-17 PMID 9679522
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;81(12):1363-8 PMID 20881017
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Aug;31(8):868-78 PMID 26644304
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Jul;41(7):1510-30 PMID 19516148
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 May 31;(5):CD004744 PMID 23728651
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2016 Mar;23 (3):527-41 PMID 26662508
Cites: Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2012 Jul;40(3):153-8 PMID 22504726
Cites: Neurology. 1989 Sep;39(9):1159-65 PMID 2771064
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016 May 1;17(5):381-92 PMID 27012368
Cites: Arch Med Res. 2012 Nov;43(8):615-21 PMID 23085449
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2016 May;64:326-45 PMID 26915926
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2007 Jul 03;7:30 PMID 17608932
Cites: JAMA. 1963 Sep 21;185:914-9 PMID 14044222
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-83 PMID 1593914
Cites: Phys Ther. 2006 Apr;86(4):489-98 PMID 16579666
Cites: Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Dec;12 (12 ):1207-1215 PMID 27344641
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015 ;50(2):443-53 PMID 26682695
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;23(11):1106-16 PMID 25648055
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2014 Aug;13(8):788-94 PMID 25030513
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-98 PMID 1202204
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Feb 15;(2):CD005562 PMID 22336813
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 15;(4):CD006489 PMID 25874613
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-64 PMID 26782852
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998 Jun;30(6):975-91 PMID 9624661
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2017 Mar 1;18(3):227-233 PMID 27810267
Cites: Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2014 Mar;72(3):190-6 PMID 24676435
Cites: JAMA. 2015 Aug 25;314(8):781-90 PMID 26305648
Cites: J Sci Med Sport. 2016 Apr;19(4):293-8 PMID 26087884
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 May 14;10(5):e0126102 PMID 25974049
Cites: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2011 Aug;26(5):381-8 PMID 21852281
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Oct;53(10):1681-7 PMID 16181166
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;41(2):615-31 PMID 24662102
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 22;(4):CD005381 PMID 25900537
Cites: Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2006 Feb;20(1):12-20 PMID 16442470
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Mar;26(1):12-9 PMID 21564154
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1984 Nov;141(11):1356-64 PMID 6496779
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Feb 15;108(7):3017-22 PMID 21282661
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Sep;40(9):922-35 PMID 1512391
PubMed ID
28800328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Function in Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284826
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;60(1):323-332
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Annika Toots
Håkan Littbrand
Gustaf Boström
Carl Hörnsten
Henrik Holmberg
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Nina Lindelöf
Peter Nordström
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;60(1):323-332
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Although physical exercise has been suggested to influence cognitive function, previous exercise studies show inconsistent results in people with dementia.
To investigate effects of exercise on cognitive function in people with dementia.
The Ume? Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study, a cluster-randomized controlled trial, was set in 16 nursing homes in Ume?, Sweden. One hundred-and-forty-one women and 45 men with dementia; mean age of 85 y and mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 15, were randomized to a High-Intensity Functional Exercise program or a seated attention control activity. Blinded assessors measured global cognitive function using the MMSE and the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), and executive function using Verbal fluency (VF) at baseline and 4 months (directly after intervention completion), and MMSE and VF at 7 months.
Linear mixed models showed no between-group effects in mean difference from baseline (95% confidence intervals, CI) at 4 months in MMSE (-0.27; 95% CI -1.4 to 0.87, p?=?0.644), ADAS-Cog (-1.04, 95% CI -4 to 1.92, p?=?0.491), or VF (-0.53, 95% CI -1.42 to 0.35, p?=?0.241) or at 7 months in MMSE (-1.15, 95% CI -2.32 to 0.03, p?=?0.056) or VF (-0.18, 95% CI -1.09 to 0.74, p?=?0.707).
A 4-month, high-intensity functional exercise program had no superior effects on global cognition or executive function in people with dementia living in nursing homes when compared with an attention control activity.
Notes
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Apr;64(4):731-827037872
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010;29(2):109-1420150731
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 1998 Jul;53(4):S209-179679522
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;81(12):1363-820881017
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Aug;31(8):868-7826644304
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Jul;41(7):1510-3019516148
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 May 31;(5):CD00474423728651
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2016 Mar;23 (3):527-4126662508
Cites: Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2012 Jul;40(3):153-822504726
Cites: Neurology. 1989 Sep;39(9):1159-652771064
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016 May 1;17(5):381-9227012368
Cites: Arch Med Res. 2012 Nov;43(8):615-2123085449
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2016 May;64:326-4526915926
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2007 Jul 03;7:3017608932
Cites: JAMA. 1963 Sep 21;185:914-914044222
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: Phys Ther. 2006 Apr;86(4):489-9816579666
Cites: Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Dec;12 (12 ):1207-121527344641
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2015 ;50(2):443-5326682695
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;23(11):1106-1625648055
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2014 Aug;13(8):788-9425030513
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Feb 15;(2):CD00556222336813
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 15;(4):CD00648925874613
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-6426782852
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998 Jun;30(6):975-919624661
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2017 Mar 1;18(3):227-23327810267
Cites: Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2014 Mar;72(3):190-624676435
Cites: JAMA. 2015 Aug 25;314(8):781-9026305648
Cites: J Sci Med Sport. 2016 Apr;19(4):293-826087884
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 May 14;10(5):e012610225974049
Cites: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2011 Aug;26(5):381-821852281
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Oct;53(10):1681-716181166
Cites: J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;41(2):615-3124662102
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Apr 22;(4):CD00538125900537
Cites: Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2006 Feb;20(1):12-2016442470
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Mar;26(1):12-921564154
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1984 Nov;141(11):1356-646496779
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Feb 15;108(7):3017-2221282661
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Sep;40(9):922-351512391
PubMed ID
28800328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exercise effects on backward walking speed in people with dementia: A randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303680
Source
Gait Posture. 2021 Jan 13; 85:65-70
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-13-2021
Author
Annika Toots
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Peter Nordström
Yngve Gustafson
Erik Rosendahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: annika.toots@umu.se.
Source
Gait Posture. 2021 Jan 13; 85:65-70
Date
Jan-13-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Multidirectional walking, including backward walking, is integral to daily activities, and seems particularly challenging in older age, and in people with pathology affecting postural control such as dementia.
Does exercise influence backward walking speed in people with dementia, when tested using habitual walking aids and without, and do effects differ according to walking aid use?
This study included 141 women and 45 men (mean age 85 years) with dementia from the Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX), a cluster-randomized controlled trial study set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden. Participants were randomized to a High-Intensity Functional Exercise (HIFE) program targeting lower limb strength-, balance and mobility exercise or to a seated attention control activity. Blinded assessors measured 2.4-meter usual backward walking speed, at baseline, 4 - (intervention completion) and 7-month follow-up; tested 1) with habitual walking aids allowed, and 2) without walking aids.
Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect in either backward walking speed test at 4 or 7 months; test 1) 0.005 m/s, P = .788 and -0.006 m/s, P = .754 and test 2) 0.030 m/s, P = .231 and 0.015 m/s, P = .569, respectively. In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between participants who habitually walked unaided compared with those that used a walking aid at 7 months (0.094 m/s, P = .027).
In this study of older people with dementia living in nursing homes, the effects of exercise had no overall effects on backwards walking speed. Nevertheless, some benefit was indicated in participants who habitually walked unaided, which is promising and merits further investigation in future studies.
PubMed ID
33517038 View in PubMed
Less detail

A high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise program for older people dependent in activities of daily living and living in residential care facilities: evaluation of the applicability with focus on cognitive function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76225
Source
Phys Ther. 2006 Apr;86(4):489-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Håkan Littbrand
Erik Rosendahl
Nina Lindelöf
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Yngve Gustafson
Lars Nyberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine and Physiotherapy, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. erik.rosendahl@germed.umu.se
Source
Phys Ther. 2006 Apr;86(4):489-98
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Dementia - epidemiology
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Frail Elderly
Humans
Lower Extremity - physiology
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residential Facilities
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight-Bearing - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Knowledge concerning the applicability and the effect of high-intensity exercise programs is very limited for older people with severe cognitive and physical impairments. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of a high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise program among older people who are dependent in activities of daily living and living in residential care facilities. A second aim was to analyze whether cognitive function was associated with the applicability of the program. SUBJECTS: The subjects were 91 older people (mean age=85.3 years, SD=6.1, range=68-100) who were dependent in personal activities of daily living and randomly assigned to participate in an exercise intervention. Their mean score for the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was 17.5 (SD=5.0, range=10-29). METHODS: A high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise program was performed in groups of 3 to 7 participants who were supervised by physical therapists. There were 29 exercise sessions over 13 weeks. Attendance, intensity of lower-limb strength and balance exercises, and occurrence and seriousness of adverse events were the outcome variables in evaluating the applicability of the program. RESULTS: The median attendance rate was 76%. Lower-limb strength exercises with high intensity were performed in a median of 53% of the attended exercise sessions, and balance exercises with high intensity were performed in a median of 73% of the attended exercise sessions. The median rate of sessions with adverse events was 5%. All except 2 adverse events were assessed as minor and temporary, and none led to manifest injury or disease. No significant differences were observed in applicability when comparing participants with dementia and participants without dementia. In addition, there was no significant correlation between applicability and the MMSE score. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The results suggest that a high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise program is applicable for use, regardless of cognitive function, among older people who are dependent in activities of daily living, living in residential care facilities, and have an MMSE score of 10 or higher.
PubMed ID
16579666 View in PubMed
Less detail

Morale in the oldest old: the UmeƄ 85+ study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45712
Source
Age Ageing. 2005 May;34(3):249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Petra von Heideken Wågert
Birgitta Rönnmark
Erik Rosendahl
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Janna M C Gustavsson
Björn Nygren
Berit Lundman
Astrid Norberg
Yngve Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine and Physiotherapy, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. petra.heideken.wagert@germed.umu.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2005 May;34(3):249-55
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Interviews
Morale
Psychological Tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: to describe morale among the oldest old, and to investigate which social, functional and medical factors are associated with morale in this population. DESIGN: a cross-sectional study. SETTING: a population-based study in the municipality of Umeå, a city in Northern Sweden. SUBJECTS: half of the 85-year-old population, and the total population of 90-year-olds and > or = 95-year-olds (95-103) were asked to participate (n = 319) and 238 were interviewed. METHODS: structured interviews and assessments during home visits, interviews with relatives and caregivers and review of medical charts. The 17-item Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) was used to measure morale. Participants were assessed with the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Index, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and a symptom questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to find independent factors to explain the variation in the PGCMS score. RESULTS: eighty-four per cent (n = 199) of those interviewed answered the PGCMS. Three-quarters had middle range or high morale. GDS score, type of housing, previous stroke, loneliness and number of symptoms, adjusted for age group and sex, explained 49.3% of the variance of total PGCMS score. CONCLUSIONS: a large proportion of the oldest old had high morale. The most important factors for high morale were the absence of depressive symptoms, living in ordinary housing, having previously had a stroke and yet still living in ordinary housing, not feeling lonely and low number of symptoms. The PGCMS seems applicable in the evaluation of morale among the oldest old.
PubMed ID
15784647 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.