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Associations between complex multimorbidity, activities of daily living and mortality among older Norwegians. A prospective cohort study: the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307226
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2020 01 21; 20(1):21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-21-2020
Author
Siri H Storeng
Kristin H Vinjerui
Erik R Sund
Steinar Krokstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway. siri.h.storeng@ntnu.no.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2020 01 21; 20(1):21
Date
01-21-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multimorbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
With increasing age, having multiple chronic conditions is the norm. It is of importance to study how co-existence of diseases affects functioning and mortality among older persons. Complex multimorbidity may be defined as three or more conditions affecting at least three different organ systems. The aim of this study was to investigate how complex multimorbidity affects activities of daily living and mortality amongst older Norwegians.
Participants were 60-69-year-olds at baseline in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 1995-1997 (HUNT2) n?=?9058. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between complex multimorbidity in HUNT2, basic and instrumental activities of daily living in HUNT3 (2006-2008) and mortality during follow-up (n?=?5819/5836). Risk ratios (RR) and risk differences (RD) in percentage points (pp) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported.
47.8% of 60-69-year-olds met the criteria of complex multimorbidity at baseline (HUNT2). Having complex multimorbidity was strongly associated with the need for assistance in IADL in HUNT3 11 years later (RR?=?1.80 (1.58-2.04) and RD?=?8.7 (6.8-10.5) pp) and moderately associated with mortality during the follow-up time (RR?=?1.22 (1.12-1.33) and RD?=?5.1 (2.9-7.3) pp). Complex multimorbidity was to a lesser extent associated with basic activities of daily living 11?years later (RR?=?1.24 (0.85-1.83) and RD?=?0.4 (-?0.3-1.1) pp).
This is the first study to show an association between complex multimorbidity and activities of daily living. Complex multimorbidity should receive more attention in order to prevent future disability amongst older persons.
PubMed ID
31964341 View in PubMed
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The associations of sitting time and physical activity on total and site-specific cancer incidence: Results from the HUNT study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299136
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(10):e0206015
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Vegar Rangul
Erik R Sund
Paul Jarle Mork
Oluf Dimitri Røe
Adrian Bauman
Author Affiliation
HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(10):e0206015
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Exercise
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - physiopathology
Norway - epidemiology
Sitting Position
Abstract
Sedentary behavior is thought to pose different risks to those attributable to physical inactivity. However, few studies have examined the association between physical activity and sitting time with cancer incidence within the same population.
We followed 38,154 healthy Norwegian adults in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) for cancer incidence from 1995-97 to 2014. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate risk of site-specific and total cancer incidence by baseline sitting time and physical activity.
During the 16-years follow-up, 4,196 (11%) persons were diagnosed with cancer. We found no evidence that people who had prolonged sitting per day or had low levels of physical activity had an increased risk of total cancer incidence, compared to those who had low sitting time and were physically active. In the multivariate model, sitting =8 h/day was associated with 22% (95% CI, 1.05-1.42) higher risk of prostate cancer compared to sitting 16.6 MET-h/week). The joint effects of physical activity and sitting time the indicated that prolonged sitting time increased the risk of CRC independent of physical activity in men.
Our findings suggest that prolonged sitting and low physical activity are positively associated with colorectal-, prostate- and lung cancer among men. Sitting time and physical activity were not associated with cancer incidence among women. The findings emphasizing the importance of reducing sitting time and increasing physical activity.
PubMed ID
30352079 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure changes during 22-year of follow-up in large general population - the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278028
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016 May 12;16:94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-2016
Author
Jostein Holmen
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Aage Tverdal
Oddgeir Lingaas Holmen
Erik R Sund
Kristian Midthjell
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016 May 12;16:94
Date
May-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Heart rate
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity, Metabolically Benign - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
While hypertension still is a major health problem worldwide, some studies have indicated that the blood pressure level has decreased in some populations. This population based cohort study aims at analysing blood pressure changes in a large Norwegian population over a 22 year period.
Data is acquired from three comprehensive health surveys of the HUNT Study conducted from 1984-86 to 2006-08. All citizens of Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway, >20 years were invited: 74,549 individuals participated in 1984-86; 64,523 in 1995-97; and 43,905 in 2006-08.
Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels decreased substantially from mid 1980s to mid 2000s, with the most pronounced decrease from 1995-97 to 2006-08 (from 136.0/78.9 to 128.3/70.9 mmHg in women and from 140.1/82.1 to 133.7/76.5 mmHg in men). Although the use of blood pressure lowering medication increased, there was a considerable decrease even in those who reported never use of medication (mean decrease 6.8/7.2 mmHg in women and 6.3/5.3 mmHg in men), and the decrease was most pronounced in the elderly (mean decrease 16.1/12.4 mmHg in women and 14.7/10.4 mmHg in men aged 80+). Mean heart rate, total cholesterol and daily smoking decreased, self-reported hard physical activity increased, while body weight and the prevalence of diabetes increased during the same period.
The BP decrease might seem paradoxically, as body weight and prevalence of diabetes increased during the same period. Salt consumption might have decreased, but no salt data is available. The parallel decrease in mean heart rate might indicate reduction in the white-coat phenomenon, or increased use of beta blockers or calcium channel blockers for other diagnosis than hypertension. Additionally, the data could support the "healthy obese" hypothesis, i.e., that subgroups in the population can sustain obesity without serious health consequences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27176717 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decennial trends and inequalities in healthy life expectancy: The HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290051
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 46(1):124-131
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Siri H Storeng
Steinar Krokstad
Steinar Westin
Erik R Sund
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 46(1):124-131
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Norway is experiencing a rising life expectancy combined with an increasing dependency ratio - the ratio of those outside over those within the working force. To provide data relevant for future health policy we wanted to study trends in total and healthy life expectancy in a Norwegian population over three decades (1980s, 1990s and 2000s), both overall and across gender and educational groups.
Data were obtained from the HUNT Study, and the Norwegian Educational Database. We calculated total life expectancy and used the Sullivan method to calculate healthy life expectancies based on self-rated health and self-reported longstanding limiting illness. The change in health expectancies was decomposed into mortality and disability effects.
During three consecutive decades we found an increase in life expectancy for 30-year-olds (~7 years) and expected lifetime in self-rated good health (~6 years), but time without longstanding limiting illness increased less (1.5 years). Women could expect to live longer than men, but the extra life years for females were spent in poor self-rated health and with longstanding limiting illness. Differences in total life expectancy between educational groups decreased, whereas differences in expected lifetime in self-rated good health and lifetime without longstanding limiting illness increased.
The increase in total life expectancy was accompanied by an increasing number of years spent in good self-rated health but more years with longstanding limiting illness. This suggests increasing health care needs for people with chronic diseases, given an increasing number of elderly. Socioeconomic health inequalities remain a challenge for increasing pensioning age.
PubMed ID
29191110 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with basic and instrumental activities of daily living in elderly participants of a population-based survey: the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295164
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 03 12; 8(3):e018942
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-12-2018
Author
Siri Høivik Storeng
Erik R Sund
Steinar Krokstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 03 12; 8(3):e018942
Date
03-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Depression - epidemiology
Disabled Persons - psychology
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Report
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Participation - psychology
Abstract
To investigate factors associated with the need for assistance in basic and instrumental activities of daily living in Norwegian elderly.
Prospective cohort study.
The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), a large population-based health survey in Norway.
5050 individuals aged 60-69?years old at baseline in HUNT2 (1995-1997) who also participated in HUNT3 (2006-2008) were included in the study. 676/693 individuals were excluded in the analyses due to missing outcomes.
Needing assistance in one or more basic or instrumental activities of daily living reported in HUNT3.
In adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses, poor self-rated health and depression were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more basic activities of daily living in HUNT3, with ORs of 2.13 (1.35 to 3.38) and 1.58 (0.91 to 2.73). Poor self-rated health and poor life satisfaction were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more instrumental activities of daily living in HUNT3, with ORs of 2.30 (1.93 to 2.74) and 2.29 (1.86 to 2.81), respectively. Excessive sitting time, short or prolonged sleeping time, and physical inactivity seemed to be the most important lifestyle risk factors for basic/instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL) disability. The studied factors were, in general, greater risk factors for mortality during follow-up than for ADL/IADL disability. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for mortality during follow-up and non-participation in HUNT3. Smoking and low social participation were the strongest risk factors for non-participation in HUNT3.
Subjective health perception, life satisfaction and depression were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more basic/instrumental activities of daily living later in life. These factors could be possible targets for prevention purposes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29530908 View in PubMed
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Genetic associations with temporal shifts in obesity and severe obesity during the obesity epidemic in Norway: A longitudinal population-based cohort (the HUNT Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303906
Source
PLoS Med. 2020 12; 17(12):e1003452
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2020
Author
Maria Brandkvist
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Rønnaug Astri Ødegård
Ben Brumpton
George Davey Smith
Bjørn Olav Åsvold
Erik R Sund
Kirsti Kvaløy
Cristen J Willer
Gunnhild Åberge Vie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
PLoS Med. 2020 12; 17(12):e1003452
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Epidemics
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Health Surveys
Heredity
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Phenotype
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Weight Gain - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Obesity has tripled worldwide since 1975 as environments are becoming more obesogenic. Our study investigates how changes in population weight and obesity over time are associated with genetic predisposition in the context of an obesogenic environment over 6 decades and examines the robustness of the findings using sibling design.
A total of 67,110 individuals aged 13-80 years in the Nord-Trøndelag region of Norway participated with repeated standardized body mass index (BMI) measurements from 1966 to 2019 and were genotyped in a longitudinal population-based health study, the Trøndelag Health Study (the HUNT Study). Genotyping required survival to and participation in the HUNT Study in the 1990s or 2000s. Linear mixed models with observations nested within individuals were used to model the association between a genome-wide polygenic score (GPS) for BMI and BMI, while generalized estimating equations were used for obesity (BMI = 30 kg/m2) and severe obesity (BMI = 35 kg/m2). The increase in the average BMI and prevalence of obesity was steeper among the genetically predisposed. Among 35-year-old men, the prevalence of obesity for the least predisposed tenth increased from 0.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6% to 1.2%) to 6.5% (95% CI 5.0% to 8.0%), while the most predisposed tenth increased from 14.2% (95% CI 12.6% to 15.7%) to 39.6% (95% CI 36.1% to 43.0%). Equivalently for women of the same age, the prevalence of obesity for the least predisposed tenth increased from 1.1% (95% CI 0.7% to1.5%) to 7.6% (95% CI 6.0% to 9.2%), while the most predisposed tenth increased from 15.4% (95% CI 13.7% to 17.2%) to 42.0% (95% CI 38.7% to 45.4%). Thus, for 35-year-old men and women, respectively, the absolute change in the prevalence of obesity from 1966 to 2019 was 19.8 percentage points (95% CI 16.2 to 23.5, p
PubMed ID
33315864 View in PubMed
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Intergenerational Hazardous Alcohol Use and Area Factors: The HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277454
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2015;50(14):1753-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Siri Håvås Haugland
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Steinar Krokstad
Erik R Sund
Grete H Bratberg
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2015;50(14):1753-64
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Underage Drinking - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol use among adolescents has been found to be associated with parental alcohol abuse, but it's relation to more prevalent forms of hazardous drinking patterns among parents has been less explored. Few studies have included area factors when investigating alcohol use across generations.
The aims of this study were to investigate whether adolescent intoxication was associated with parental heavy episodic drinking (HED) and intoxication, area-level socioeconomic status (SES), and rates of area-level HED.
General Estimation Equations (GEE) was applied to analyze data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (2006-08) including 2,306 adolescents. Adolescent alcohol use was defined by self-reported frequency of intoxication. Parental alcohol use was defined by parental self-reports of drinking five glasses of alcohol at one occasion (HED), whether they had been strongly intoxicated, and adolescent reports of seeing parents intoxicated. Area-level SES and HED were based on data from HUNT3 and Statistics Norway.
Parental and offspring alcohol use were associated, although this varied to some extent with gender and exposures. The strongest associations were found between offspring intoxication and offspring reports of seeing their parent intoxicated (girls: OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.3-4.7; boys: OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-4.7). Intoxication was more common among girls, who lived in areas with a higher level of adult HED. Living in areas with higher SES was associated with less intoxication among adolescents.
Intoxication in adolescence was associated with factors at both family and area level, which emphasize the need of both population and high risk preventive approaches.
PubMed ID
26646627 View in PubMed
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Multiple lifestyle behaviours and mortality, findings from a large population-based Norwegian cohort study - The HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285394
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Jan 10;17(1):58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2017
Author
Steinar Krokstad
Ding Ding
Anne C Grunseit
Erik R Sund
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Vegar Rangul
Adrian Bauman
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Jan 10;17(1):58
Date
Jan-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Sleep
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Behavior
Young Adult
Abstract
Lifestyle risk behaviours are responsible for a large proportion of disease burden and premature mortality worldwide. Risk behaviours tend to cluster in populations. We developed a new lifestyle risk index by including emerging risk factors (sleep, sitting time, and social participation) and examine unique risk combinations and their associations with all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality.
Data are from a large population-based cohort study in a Norway, the Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT), with an average follow-up time of 14.1?years. Baseline data from 1995-97 were linked to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry. The analytic sample comprised 36 911 adults aged 20-69 years. Cox regression models were first fitted for seven risk factors (poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, current smoking, physical inactivity, excessive sitting, too much/too little sleep, and poor social participation) separately and then adjusted for socio-demographic covariates. Based on these results, a lifestyle risk index was developed. Finally, we explored common combinations of the risk factors in relation to all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality outcomes.
All single risk factors, except for diet, were significantly associated with both mortality outcomes, and were therefore selected to form a lifestyle risk index. Risk of mortality increased as the index score increased. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality increased from 1.37 (1.15-1.62) to 6.15 (3.56-10.63) as the number of index risk factors increased from one to six respectively. Among the most common risk factor combinations the association with mortality was particularly strong when smoking and/or social participation were included.
This study adds to previous research on multiple risk behaviours by incorporating emerging risk factors. Findings regarding social participation and prolonged sitting suggest new components of healthy lifestyles and potential new directions for population health interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28068991 View in PubMed
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Prevalence, clustering and combined effects of lifestyle behaviours and their association with health after retirement age in a prospective cohort study, the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305611
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Jun 10; 20(1):900
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-10-2020
Author
Siri H Storeng
Erik R Sund
Steinar Krokstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Post box 8905, Håkon Jarls gate 11, N-7491, Trondheim, Norway. siri.h.storeng@ntnu.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Jun 10; 20(1):900
Date
Jun-10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Exercise
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Retirement
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Sedentary Behavior
Sleep Wake Disorders - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Participation
Abstract
Lifestyle behaviours are potential risk factors for disease and mortality, but less is known about the association with health in retirement age. The aim of this paper was to study the prevalence, clustering and combined effects of lifestyle behaviours and their association with health outcomes in the first decade after retirement in a Norwegian cohort.
Participants were 55-64-year-olds at baseline in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey 2 (HUNT2, 1995-97) who also participated in HUNT3 (2006-08). Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association of daily smoking, physical inactivity, risky alcohol consumption, disturbed sleep duration, excessive sitting time and low social participation before retirement with self-rated health (n?=?4022), life satisfaction (n?=?5134), anxiety (n?=?4461) and depression (n?=?5083) after retirement, 11?years later.
Low social participation and physical inactivity were the most prevalent lifestyle behaviours (41.1 and 40.6%). Risky alcohol consumption and disturbed sleep were the lifestyle behaviours most strongly associated with poor self-rated health, poor life satisfaction and anxiety after retirement (OR's?=?1.39-1.92). Physical inactivity was additionally associated with depression (OR?=?1.44 (1.12-1.85)). Physical inactivity had the largest population attributable fractions for reducing poor self-rated health and depression (14.9 and 8.8%). An increasing number of lifestyle risk behaviours incrementally increased the risk for the adverse health outcomes.
Risky alcohol consumption and disturbed sleep duration were most strongly associated with poor health outcomes after retirement age. On a population level, increased physical activity before retirement had the largest potential for reducing adverse health outcomes after retirement age.
PubMed ID
32522193 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of multimorbidity with frailty and associations with socioeconomic position in an adult population: findings from the cross-sectional HUNT Study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305585
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 06 15; 10(6):e035070
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-15-2020
Author
Kristin Hestmann Vinjerui
Pauline Boeckxstaens
Kirsty A Douglas
Erik R Sund
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, HUNT Research Centre, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway kristin.vinjerui@ntnu.no.
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 06 15; 10(6):e035070
Date
06-15-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Frailty - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multimorbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Occupations
Prevalence
Social Class
Abstract
To explore prevalences and occupational group inequalities of two measures of multimorbidity with frailty.
Cross-sectional study.
The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway, a total county population health survey, 2006-2008.
Participants older than 25 years, with complete questionnaires, measurements and occupation data were included.
=2 of 51 multimorbid conditions with =1 of 4 frailty measures (poor health, mental illness, physical impairment or social impairment) and =3 of 51 multimorbid conditions with =2 of 4 frailty measures.
Logistic regression models with age and occupational group were specified for each sex separately.
Of 41 193 adults, 38 027 (55% female; 25-100 years old) were included. Of them, 39% had =2 multimorbid conditions with =1 frailty measure, and 17% had =3 multimorbid conditions with =2 frailty measures. Prevalence differences in percentage points (pp) with 95% confidence intervals of those in high versus low occupational group with =2 multimorbid conditions and =1 frailty measure were largest in women age 30 years, 17 (14 to 20) pp and 55 years, 15 (13 to 17) pp and in men age 55 years, 15 (13 to 17) pp and 80 years, 14 (9 to 18) pp. In those with =3 multimorbid conditions and =2 frailty measures, prevalence differences were largest in women age 30 years, 8 (6 to 10) pp and 55 years, 10 (8 to 11) ppand in men age 55 years, 9 (8 to 11) pp and 80 years, 6 (95% CI 1 to 10) pp.
Multimorbidity with frailty is common, and social inequalities persist until age 80 years in women and throughout the lifespan in men. To manage complex multimorbidity, strategies for proportionate universalism in medical education, healthcare, public health prevention and promotion seem necessary.
PubMed ID
32546489 View in PubMed
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