Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Antimicrobial resistance among Helicobacter pylori isolates in Alaska, 2000-2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292657
Source
J Glob Antimicrob Resist. 2018 Jun 30; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-30-2018
Author
Emily Mosites
Dana Bruden
Julie Morris
Alisa Reasonover
Karen Rudolph
Debra Hurlburt
Thomas Hennessy
Brian McMahon
Michael Bruce
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4055 Tudor Centre Dr, Anchorage, Alaska 99508. Electronic address: lwx7@cdc.gov.
Source
J Glob Antimicrob Resist. 2018 Jun 30; :
Date
Jun-30-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Alaska Native people experience a high burden of Helicobacter pylori infection and concomitant high rates of gastric cancer. Additionally, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant strains of H. pylori has been shown to be high in Alaska. We evaluated antimicrobial resistance over time among sentinel surveillance isolates and assessed risk factors for carrying resistant H. pylori.
Through Alaska's H. pylori sentinel surveillance system, we collected and cultured antral and fundal biopsies from Alaska Native patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for clinical indications during 2000-2016. For positive cultures, we performed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing for metronidazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, and levofloxacin.
We tested 800H. pylori isolates obtained from 763 patients. Metronidazole resistance was most common (342/800; 43%), followed by clarithromycin resistance (238/800; 30%), resistance to both clarithromycin and metronidazole (128/800; 16%), and levofloxacin resistance (113/800; 15%). Low proportions of isolates were resistant to amoxicillin and tetracycline. Levofloxacin resistance increased between 2000 and 2016 (p
PubMed ID
29969753 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community water service and incidence of respiratory, skin, and gastrointestinal infections in rural Alaska, 2013-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306919
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2020 04; 225:113475
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
04-2020
Author
Emily Mosites
Brian Lefferts
Sara Seeman
Gerald January
Jennifer Dobson
David Fuente
Michael Bruce
Timothy Thomas
Thomas Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Zoonotic and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA. Electronic address: lwx7@cdc.gov.
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2020 04; 225:113475
Date
04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rural Population
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Water supply
Young Adult
Abstract
Communities in rural Alaska have access to multiple types of water service (piped, vehicle-hauled, and self-hauled) and experience varying levels of water service coverage. We assessed the incidence rate of inpatient and outpatient infectious disease visits among communities with different water service types and coverage levels.
We classified ICD-9 codes for inpatient and outpatient visits to the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation facilities between 2013 and 2015 into six infectious disease categories. Using Poisson models, we compared the incidence of visits in each category across communities with differing water service coverage levels as defined by water service billing data for the same years. Using census data, we adjusted for community median household income, median age, crowding, and health aide staffing.
We included 48 communities in this analysis. After adjusting for possible confounders, each 10% increase in piped water coverage was associated with a 4% lower incidence of pneumonia/influenza visits (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.98), a 2% lower incidence of other respiratory infection visits (adjusted IRR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99), an 8% lower incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus visits (adjusted IRR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87-0.97), and a 4% lower incidence of other skin infections visits (adjusted IRR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.98). Each 10% increase in vehicle-hauled water coverage was associated with a 2% lower incidence of respiratory infection visits (adjusted IRR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.996) and a 3% lower incidence of skin infection visits (adjusted IRR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95-0.99), also after adjustment.
Higher levels of water service coverage were associated with lower incidence rates of visits for several infectious disease categories. These associations were more pronounced for communities with piped water service compared to vehicle-hauled water service.
PubMed ID
32058938 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of individual-level vs. hypothetically pooled mercury biomonitoring data from the Maternal Organics Monitoring Study (MOMS), Alaska, 1999-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306987
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1726256
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2020
Author
Emily Mosites
Ernesto Rodriguez
Samuel P Caudill
Thomas W Hennessy
James Berner
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1726256
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Biological Monitoring - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Indians, North American
Mercury - blood
Pregnancy
Trace Elements - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Biomonitoring for heavy metals is important to assess health risks, especially in Arctic communities where rural residents rely on locally harvested foods. However, laboratory testing for blood contaminants is expensive and might not be sustainable for long-term monitoring. We assessed whether pooled specimen biomonitoring could be a part of a plan for blood contaminant surveillance among pregnant women in rural Alaska using existing blood mercury level data from three cross sectional studies of pregnant women. We applied a hypothetical pooled specimen template stratified into 8 demographic groups based on age, coastal or inland residence, and pre-pregnancy weight. The hypothetical geometric mean blood mercury levels were similar to the individual-level geometric means. However, the 95% confidence intervals were much wider for the hypothetical geometric means compared to the true geometric means. Although the variability that resulted from pooling specimens using a small sample made it difficult to compare demographic groups to each other, pooled specimen results could be an accurate reflection of the population burden of mercury contamination in the Arctic in the context of large numbers of biomonitoring samples.
PubMed ID
32039659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Environmental observation, social media, and One Health action: A description of the Local Environmental Observer (LEO) Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295801
Source
One Health. 2018 Dec; 6:29-33
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Emily Mosites
Erica Lujan
Michael Brook
Michael Brubaker
Desirae Roehl
Moses Tcheripanoff
Thomas Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK, United States.
Source
One Health. 2018 Dec; 6:29-33
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
As a result of the close relationships between Arctic residents and the environment, climate change has a disproportionate impact on Arctic communities. Despite the need for One Health responses to climate change, environmental monitoring is difficult to conduct in Arctic regions. The Local Environmental Observer (LEO) Network is a global social media network that recruits citizen scientists to collect environmental observations on social media. We examined the processes of the LEO Network, numbers of members and observations, and three case studies that depict One Health action enabled by the system. From February 2012 to July 2017, the LEO Network gained 1870 members in 35 countries. In this time period, 670 environmental observations were posted. Examples that resulted in One Health action include those involving food sources, wild fire smoke, and thawing permafrost. The LEO network is an example of a One Health resource that stimulates action to protect the health of communities around the world.
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2017 Dec 11;12(12):e0188819 PMID 29228053
Cites: Glob Chang Biol. 2018 Oct;24(10):4478-4488 PMID 29845698
Cites: Ecol Appl. 2018 Oct;28(7):1773-1781 PMID 29786900
Cites: Acta Vet Scand. 2011 Mar 11;53:17 PMID 21392401
Cites: Environ Sci Eur. 2017;29(1):23 PMID 28752018
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2011;4:null PMID 22022304
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Jun 4;110(23):9320-5 PMID 23690592
Cites: Semin Respir Infect. 2002 Dec;17(4):303-9 PMID 12497547
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2017 Jun 5;372(1722):null PMID 28438919
Cites: Nat Commun. 2015 Jul 14;6:7537 PMID 26172867
Cites: BMC Ecol. 2017 Dec 19;17(1):44 PMID 29258497
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2013 Jan;26(1):19-35 PMID 23297257
Cites: Nat Commun. 2017 Oct 24;8(1):916 PMID 29066710
Cites: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1996 Aug 15;209(4):707, 710 PMID 8756855
Cites: Ecohealth. 2015 Dec;12(4):713-25 PMID 26070525
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Sep 01;74:27913 PMID 26333722
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2011;4:null PMID 22114567
Cites: JMIR Public Health Surveill. 2017 Oct 11;3(4):e62 PMID 29021131
Cites: Indian Dermatol Online J. 2017 Jan-Feb;8(1):29-31 PMID 28217468
Cites: Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 2017 Oct;55:186-195 PMID 28892756
Cites: Pathog Dis. 2017 Mar 1;75(2): PMID 28158404
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Dec 13;75:33820 PMID 27974139
Cites: Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2017 Jun 1;111(6):278-284 PMID 29044374
Cites: PLoS One. 2017 Dec 6;12(12):e0188507 PMID 29211752
Cites: Biodivers Data J. 2017 Oct 10;(5):e19938 PMID 29104436
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2018 May 15;624:845-858 PMID 29274609
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 2017 Feb;38(1):121-136 PMID 28275255
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2017 Sep 1;72(9):2661-2665 PMID 28595316
PubMed ID
30386813 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hepatitis A vaccine immune response 22 years after vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291271
Source
J Med Virol. 2018 Aug; 90(8):1418-1422
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Emily Mosites
Prabhu Gounder
Mary Snowball
Julie Morris
Philip Spradling
Noele Nelson
Lisa Bulkow
Michael Bruce
Brian McMahon
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska.
Source
J Med Virol. 2018 Aug; 90(8):1418-1422
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In the United States, the incidence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection has been reduced through universal childhood vaccination. However, the duration of immunogenicity for the hepatitis A vaccine is not known. We report on the 22 year follow-up time point of a cohort of Alaska children who were randomized to three different vaccine schedules: A) 0, 1, and 2 months; B) 0, 1, and 6 months; and C) 0, 1, and 12 months. Among 46 participant available for follow-up, 40 (87%) maintained protective levels of anti-hepatitis A antibody. These results indicate that a supplemental booster dose is not yet necessary at or before the 22-year time point.
PubMed ID
29663458 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hepatitis A vaccine immune response 22 years after vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300374
Source
J Med Virol. 2018 08; 90(8):1418-1422
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
08-2018
Author
Emily Mosites
Prabhu Gounder
Mary Snowball
Julie Morris
Philip Spradling
Noele Nelson
Lisa Bulkow
Michael Bruce
Brian McMahon
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska.
Source
J Med Virol. 2018 08; 90(8):1418-1422
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis A - prevention & control
Hepatitis A Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis A Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Hepatitis A virus - immunology
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Male
Time Factors
Abstract
In the United States, the incidence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection has been reduced through universal childhood vaccination. However, the duration of immunogenicity for the hepatitis A vaccine is not known. We report on the 22 year follow-up time point of a cohort of Alaska children who were randomized to three different vaccine schedules: A) 0, 1, and 2 months; B) 0, 1, and 6 months; and C) 0, 1, and 12 months. Among 46 participant available for follow-up, 40 (87%) maintained protective levels of anti-hepatitis A antibody. These results indicate that a supplemental booster dose is not yet necessary at or before the 22-year time point.
PubMed ID
29663458 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hepatitis A vaccine immunogenicity 25 years after vaccination in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303826
Source
J Med Virol. 2020 Jul 22; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-22-2020
Author
Maya Ramaswamy
Dana Bruden
Leisha D Nolen
Emily Mosites
Mary Snowball
Noele P Nelson
Michael Bruce
Brian J McMahon
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska.
Source
J Med Virol. 2020 Jul 22; :
Date
Jul-22-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The hepatitis A vaccine is recommended for all children greater than or equal to 1 year of age, however, the duration of vaccine protection is unknown and protection through adulthood is crucial to prevent symptomatic hepatitis later in life. We report on 25 years of follow-up of a cohort of Alaska Native individuals who were vaccinated in early childhood. We assessed the duration of vaccine protection by calculating the geometric mean concentration and proportion of participants with protective levels of IgG antibody to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) (=20?mIU/mL) every 2 to 3 years. We estimated the amount of time until the anti-HAV dropped below protective levels using survival analyses. At 25 years, 43 of the original 144 participants were available, mean anti-HAV levels were 91.5?mIU/mL, and 35 (81.4%) had protective levels of anti-HAV. Using data from all persons and all time points, a survival analysis estimated 78.7% of participants had protective levels of anti-HAV at 25 years. The high level of protective antibodies in this cohort indicate that supplemental doses of hepatitis A vaccine are not needed 25 years after completion of the vaccine series.
PubMed ID
33448443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lack of in-home piped water and reported consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among adults in rural Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308892
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2020 04; 23(5):861-868
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
04-2020
Author
Emily Mosites
Sara Seeman
Andrea Fenaughty
Karol Fink
Laura Eichelberger
Peter Holck
Timothy K Thomas
Michael G Bruce
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2020 04; 23(5):861-868
Date
04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Sugars - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health status
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sugar-Sweetened Beverages - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Water
Water Supply - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess whether a community water service is associated with the frequency of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) consumption, obesity, or perceived health status in rural Alaska.
We examined the cross-sectional associations between community water access and frequency of SSB consumption, body mass index categories, and perceived health status using data from the 2013 and 2015 Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Participants were categorized by zip code to 'in-home piped water service' or 'no in-home piped water service' based on water utility data. We evaluated the univariable and multivariable (adjusting for age, household income and education) associations between water service and outcomes using log-linear survey-weighted generalized linear models.
Rural Alaska, USA.
Eight hundred and eighty-seven adults, aged 25 years and older.
In unadjusted models, participants without in-home water reported consuming SSB more often than participants with in-home water (1·46, 95 % CI: 1·06, 2·00). After adjustment for potential confounders, the effect decreased but remained borderline significant (1·29, 95 % CI: 1·00, 1·67). Obesity was not significantly associated with water service but self-reported poor health was higher in those communities without in-home water (1·63, 95 % CI: 1·05, 2·54).
Not having access to in-home piped water could affect behaviours surrounding SSB consumption and general perception of health in rural Alaska.
PubMed ID
31547892 View in PubMed
Less detail

Observed pneumococcal carriage among Alaska Native children who received reduced dose schedules of PCV 13 between 2010 and 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287095
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Nov 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-14-2017
Author
Emily Mosites
Dana Bruden
Michael G Bruce
Thomas Hennessy
Prabhu Gounder
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Nov 14;
Date
Nov-14-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
PubMed ID
29145582 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk for Invasive Streptococcal Infections among Adults Experiencing Homelessness, Anchorage, Alaska, USA, 2002-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308933
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2019 10; 25(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2019
Author
Emily Mosites
Tammy Zulz
Dana Bruden
Leisha Nolen
Anna Frick
Louisa Castrodale
Joseph McLaughlin
Chris Van Beneden
Thomas W Hennessy
Michael G Bruce
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2019 10; 25(10):
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Female
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Streptococcus agalactiae
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Streptococcus pyogenes
Abstract
The risk for invasive streptococcal infection has not been clearly quantified among persons experiencing homelessness (PEH). We compared the incidence of detected cases of invasive group A Streptococcus infection, group B Streptococcus infection, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal) infection among PEH with that among the general population in Anchorage, Alaska, USA, during 2002-2015. We used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Arctic Investigations Program surveillance system, the US Census, and the Anchorage Point-in-Time count (a yearly census of PEH). We detected a disproportionately high incidence of invasive streptococcal disease in Anchorage among PEH. Compared with the general population, PEH were 53.3 times as likely to have invasive group A Streptococcus infection, 6.9 times as likely to have invasive group B Streptococcus infection, and 36.3 times as likely to have invasive pneumococcal infection. Infection control in shelters, pneumococcal vaccination, and infection monitoring could help protect the health of this vulnerable group.
PubMed ID
31538562 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.