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Depression among the oldest old: the UmeƄ 85+ study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45649
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2005 Dec;17(4):557-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Ellinor Bergdahl
Janna M C Gustavsson
Kristina Kallin
Petra von Heideken Wågert
Berit Lundman
Gästa Bucht
Yngve Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. elrbel00@student.umu.se
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2005 Dec;17(4):557-75
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of depression among the oldest old and to analyze factors associated with depression. METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken in Umeå, Sweden. Out of 319 eligible participants aged 85, 90 and 95 years and older, it was possible to evaluate 242 people (75.9%) for depression. Data were collected from structured interviews and assessments in the participants' homes, and from medical charts, relatives and caregivers. Depression was screened for using the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 and further assessed with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Cognition was assessed using the Mini-mental State Examination, activities of daily living (ADL) using the Barthel ADL Index, nutrition using the Mini Nutritional Assessment and well-being using the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale. RESULTS: The 85-year-olds had a significantly lower prevalence of depression than the 90- and 95-year-olds (16.8% vs. 34.1% and 32.3%). No sex differences were found. One-third of those with depression had no treatment and among those with ongoing treatment 59% were still depressed. Persons diagnosed with depression had a poorer well-being and a higher 1-year mortality. Logistic regression analyses showed that depression was independently associated with living in institutions and number of medications. CONCLUSION: Depression among the oldest old is common, underdiagnosed and inadequately treated, and causes poor well-being and increased mortality. More knowledge about depression is essential to improve the assessment and treatment of depression among the oldest old.
PubMed ID
16185377 View in PubMed
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Depression among the very old with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99724
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 Dec 21;:1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-2010
Author
Ellinor Bergdahl
Per Allard
Yngve Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 Dec 21;:1-8
Date
Dec-21-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
ABSTRACTObjectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among very old individuals with dementia compared to those without dementia and to examine if there were any differences regarding associated factors between people with or without depression in these conditions.Methods: In a population-based study in Sweden, 363 participants aged 85 years and above, were evaluated for depression and dementia.Results: The prevalence of depression was significantly higher among the people with dementia than without dementia, 43% vs. 24% (p
PubMed ID
21205392 View in PubMed
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Differences in medical treatment and clinical characteristics between men and women with heart failure - a single-centre multivariable analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307443
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2020 Apr; 76(4):539-546
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Helena Norberg
Veronica Pranic
Ellinor Bergdahl
Krister Lindmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, S-901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2020 Apr; 76(4):539-546
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Aged
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Heart Failure - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hospitals, University
Humans
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Sex Characteristics
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Sweden
Abstract
The aims of this study were to examine sex differences in a heart failure population with regards to treatment and patient characteristics and to investigate the impact of sex on achieved doses of heart failure medications.
A total of 1924 patients with heart failure in a regional hospital were analysed, 622 patients had ejection fraction = 40% of which 30% were women. In patients with reduced ejection fraction, women were older (79 ± 11 vs. 74 ± 12 years, P
PubMed ID
31897534 View in PubMed
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Eligibility of sacubitril-valsartan in a real-world heart failure population: a community-based single-centre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288227
Source
ESC Heart Fail. 2018 Jan 18;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-2018
Author
Helena Norberg
Ellinor Bergdahl
Krister Lindmark
Source
ESC Heart Fail. 2018 Jan 18;
Date
Jan-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the eligibility of the Prospective Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI) with ACE inhibitor to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) study to a real-world heart failure population.
Medical records of all heart failure patients living within the catchment area of Ume? University Hospital were reviewed. This district consists of around 150?000 people. Out of 2029 patients with a diagnosis of heart failure, 1924 (95%) had at least one echocardiography performed, and 401 patients had an ejection fraction of =35% at their latest examination. The major PARADIGM-HF criteria were applied, and 95 patients fulfilled all enrolment criteria and thus were eligible for sacubitril-valsartan. This corresponds to 5% of the overall heart failure population and 24% of the population with ejection fraction?=?35%. The eligible patients were significantly older (73.2???10.3 vs. 63.8???11.5?years), had higher blood pressure (128???17 vs. 122???15?mmHg), had higher heart rate (77???17 vs. 72???12?b.p.m.), and had more atrial fibrillation (51.6% vs. 36.2%) than did the PARADIGM-HF population.
Only 24% of our real-world heart failure and reduced ejection fraction population was eligible for sacubitril-valsartan, and the real-world heart failure and reduced ejection fraction patients were significantly older than the PARADIGM-HF population. The lack of data on a majority of the patients that we see in clinical practice is a real problem, and we are limited to extrapolation of results on a slightly different population. This is difficult to address, but perhaps registry-based randomized clinical trials will help to solve this issue.
PubMed ID
29345425 View in PubMed
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One-week prevalence of depressive symptoms and psychotropic drug treatments among old people with different levels of cognitive impairment living in institutional care: changes between 1982 and 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96956
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 May 18;:1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-18-2010
Author
Hugo Lövheim
Ellinor Bergdahl
Per-Olof Sandman
Stig Karlsson
Yngve Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 May 18;:1-7
Date
May-18-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
ABSTRACTBackground: Dementia and depression are common in advanced age, and often co-exist. There are indications of a decreased prevalence of depressive symptoms among old people in recent years, supposedly because of the manifold increase in antidepressant treatment. Whether the prevalence of depressive symptoms has decreased among people in different stages of dementia disorders has not yet been investigated.Methods: A comparison was undertaken of two cross-sectional studies, conducted in 1982 and 2000, comprising 6864 participants living in geriatric care units in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS), and the cognitive score was measured with Gottfries' cognitive scale. Drug data were obtained from prescription records.Results: There was a significant decrease in depressive symptom score between 1982 and 2000 in all cognitive function groups except for the group with moderate cognitive impairment. Antidepressant drug use increased in all cognitive function groups.Conclusion: The prevalence of depressive symptoms decreased between 1982 and 2000, in all levels of cognitive impairment except moderate cognitive impairment. This might possibly be explained by the depressive symptoms having different etiologies in different stages of a dementia disorder, which in turn might not be equally susceptible to antidepressant treatment.
PubMed ID
20478102 View in PubMed
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