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Airborne exposure and biological monitoring of bar and restaurant workers before and after the introduction of a smoking ban.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82661
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Mar;8(3):362-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Ellingsen Dag G
Fladseth Geir
Daae Hanne L
Gjølstad Merete
Kjaerheim Kristina
Skogstad Marit
Olsen Raymond
Thorud Syvert
Molander Paal
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 8149 Dep, N-0033, Oslo, Norway. dag.ellingsen@stami.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Mar;8(3):362-8
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cotinine - urine
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nicotine - analysis
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Public Facilities - legislation & jurisprudence
Restaurants
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence
Time Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - analysis - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The aims were to assess the impact of a total smoking ban on the level of airborne contaminants and the urinary cotinine levels in the employees in bars and restaurants. In a follow up design, 13 bars and restaurants were visited before and after the implementation of a smoking ban. Ninety-three employees in the establishments were initially included into the study. The arithmetic mean concentration of nicotine and total dust declined from 28.3 microg m(-3) (range, 0.4-88.0) and 262 microg m(-3) (range, 52-662), respectively, to 0.6 microg m(-3) (range, not detected-3.7) and 77 microg m(-3) (range, not detected-261) after the smoking ban. The Pearson correlation coefficient between airborne nicotine and total dust was 0.86 (p
PubMed ID
16528420 View in PubMed
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Clara cell protein as a biomarker for lung epithelial injury in asphalt workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85195
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2007 Oct;49(10):1073-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Ulvestad Bente
Randem Britt Grethe
Andersson Lena
Ellingsen Dag G
Barregard Lars
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Mesta AS, Moss, Norway. bente.ulvestad@mesta.no
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2007 Oct;49(10):1073-8
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers
Epithelial Cells - pathology
Epithelium
Humans
Hydrocarbons - adverse effects
Lung - injuries - pathology
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Uteroglobin - analysis - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We investigated if asphalt workers showed signs of lung epithelial injury as shown by increased Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) in serum after 6 months of exposure. METHODS: Asphalt pavers, asphalt plant operators, and asphalt engineers underwent lung function tests and blood samples before the start of the asphalt season. The tests were repeated before the end of the asphalt season. Blood samples were analyzed for concentration of CC16 and interleukin-6 (IL-6). RESULTS: After adjustment for current smoking, the pavers had a significantly larger increase in CC16 concentrations after the season as compared with that of the engineers and plant operators. In pavers, the change in serum CC16 was correlated with the change in IL-6. CONCLUSION: CC16 increased over the season in pavers and appears to be a useful biomarker for lung epithelial injury in exposed workers.
PubMed ID
18000412 View in PubMed
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The time-trend and the relation between smoking and circulating selenium concentrations in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89214
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2009;23(2):107-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ellingsen Dag G
Thomassen Yngvar
Rustad Pål
Molander Pål
Aaseth Jan
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. dag.ellingsen@stami.no
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2009;23(2):107-15
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cotinine - blood - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Glutathione Peroxidase - blood
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nicotine - blood - urine
Norway
Selenium - blood
Smoking - blood
Trace Elements - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to investigate biomarkers of selenium status in relation to smoking habits and to analyze the time-trend of selenium in serum (S-Se) in Norway during the time period 1995-2006. METHODS: The impact of smoking habits was investigated in a population recruited to a cross-sectional study of blue-collar workers in the southern part of the country (n=98). The time-trend was studied in all subjects who delivered blood samples for the determination of S-Se to a large commercial clinical chemistry laboratory in Norway. RESULTS: Smokers had 0.14 and 0.20 micromol/L lower concentrations of selenium in whole blood (B-Se) and serum, respectively, than non-smokers. The amount of smoking, as assessed by the serum cotinine concentration, was negatively associated with the B-Se concentration (Pearson's r=-0.43). The 1/3 of the blue-collar workers with the lowest concentrations of B-Se or S-Se had lower activity of glutathione peroxidase in serum (S-GSHpx) than the remaining subjects. Snuff users had about the same levels of B-Se and S-Se as the non-smokers, although they had about the same amount of nicotine metabolites in urine and serum as the smokers. A decreasing trend of S-Se was observed during the observation period from 1995 to 2006. The mean concentration was 1.26 micromol/L in 1995, while the lowest mean concentration was measured in 2003 (1.01 micromol/L). CONCLUSION: Smoking, but not snuffing, is associated with lower concentrations of B-Se and S-Se. The reduction of B-Se is negatively associated with the nicotine biomarker cotinine in serum. A substantial proportion of blue-collar workers had not maximized the activity of S-GSHpx. Selenium status may have become poorer since 1995.
PubMed ID
19398058 View in PubMed
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