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Avoiding a crisis of motivation for ocean management under global environmental change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281995
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Apr 27;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-2017
Author
Peter J Mumby
James N Sanchirico
Kenneth Broad
Michael W Beck
Peter Tyedmers
Megan Morikawa
Thomas A Okey
Larry B Crowder
Elizabeth A Fulton
Denny Kelso
Joanie A Kleypas
Stephan B Munch
Polita Glynn
Kathryn Matthews
Jane Lubchenco
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Apr 27;
Date
Apr-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Climate change and ocean acidification are altering marine ecosystems and, from a human perspective, creating both winners and losers. Human responses to these changes are complex, but may result in reduced government investments in regulation, resource management, monitoring and enforcement. Moreover, a lack of peoples' experience of climate change may drive some towards attributing the symptoms of climate change to more familiar causes such as management failure. Taken together, we anticipate that management could become weaker and less effective as climate change continues. Using diverse case studies, including the decline of coral reefs, coastal defences from flooding, shifting fish stocks and the emergence of new shipping opportunities in the Arctic, we argue that human interests are better served by increased investments in resource management. But greater government investment in management does not simply mean more of "business-as-usual." Management needs to become more flexible, better at anticipating and responding to surprise, and able to facilitate change where it is desirable. A range of technological, economic, communication and governance solutions exists to help transform management. While not all have been tested, judicious application of the most appropriate solutions should help humanity adapt to novel circumstances and seek opportunity where possible.
PubMed ID
28447373 View in PubMed
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Avoiding a crisis of motivation for ocean management under global environmental change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294930
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 11; 23(11):4483-4496
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2017
Author
Peter J Mumby
James N Sanchirico
Kenneth Broad
Michael W Beck
Peter Tyedmers
Megan Morikawa
Thomas A Okey
Larry B Crowder
Elizabeth A Fulton
Denny Kelso
Joanie A Kleypas
Stephan B Munch
Polita Glynn
Kathryn Matthews
Jane Lubchenco
Author Affiliation
Marine Spatial Ecology Lab & ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld, Australia.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 11; 23(11):4483-4496
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Coral Reefs
Ecosystem
Fishes
Humans
Motivation
Oceans and Seas
Abstract
Climate change and ocean acidification are altering marine ecosystems and, from a human perspective, creating both winners and losers. Human responses to these changes are complex, but may result in reduced government investments in regulation, resource management, monitoring and enforcement. Moreover, a lack of peoples' experience of climate change may drive some towards attributing the symptoms of climate change to more familiar causes such as management failure. Taken together, we anticipate that management could become weaker and less effective as climate change continues. Using diverse case studies, including the decline of coral reefs, coastal defences from flooding, shifting fish stocks and the emergence of new shipping opportunities in the Arctic, we argue that human interests are better served by increased investments in resource management. But greater government investment in management does not simply mean more of "business-as-usual." Management needs to become more flexible, better at anticipating and responding to surprise, and able to facilitate change where it is desirable. A range of technological, economic, communication and governance solutions exists to help transform management. While not all have been tested, judicious application of the most appropriate solutions should help humanity adapt to novel circumstances and seek opportunity where possible.
PubMed ID
28447373 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sensitivity of the Norwegian and Barents Sea Atlantis end-to-end ecosystem model to parameter perturbations of key species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297973
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(2):e0210419
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Cecilie Hansen
Kenneth F Drinkwater
Anne Jähkel
Elizabeth A Fulton
Rebecca Gorton
Mette Skern-Mauritzen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(2):e0210419
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Using end-to-end models for ecosystem-based management requires knowledge of the structure, uncertainty and sensitivity of the model. The Norwegian and Barents Seas (NoBa) Atlantis model was implemented for use in 'what if' scenarios, combining fisheries management strategies with the influences of climate change and climate variability. Before being used for this purpose, we wanted to evaluate and identify sensitive parameters and whether the species position in the foodweb influenced their sensitivity to parameter perturbation. Perturbing recruitment, mortality, prey consumption and growth by +/- 25% for nine biomass-dominating key species in the Barents Sea, while keeping the physical climate constant, proved the growth rate to be the most sensitive parameter in the model. Their trophic position in the ecosystem (lower trophic level, mid trophic level, top predators) influenced their responses to the perturbations. Top-predators, being generalists, responded mostly to perturbations on their individual life-history parameters. Mid-level species were the most vulnerable to perturbations, not only to their own individual life-history parameters, but also to perturbations on other trophic levels (higher or lower). Perturbations on the lower trophic levels had by far the strongest impact on the system, resulting in biomass changes for nearly all components in the system. Combined perturbations often resulted in non-additive model responses, including both dampened effects and increased impact of combined perturbations. Identifying sensitive parameters and species in end-to-end models will not only provide insights about the structure and functioning of the ecosystem in the model, but also highlight areas where more information and research would be useful-both for model parameterization, but also for constraining or quantifying model uncertainty.
PubMed ID
30735534 View in PubMed
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