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The Key to Understanding the European Miocene Chalcides (Squamata, Scincidae) Comes from Asia: The Lizards of the East Siberian Tagay Locality (Baikal Lake) in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311210
Source
Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2020 07; 303(7):1901-1934
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
Andrej CerNanský
Elena V Syromyatnikova
Ekaterina S Kovalenko
Konstantin M Podurets
Alexander A Kaloyan
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology, Laboratory of Evolutionary Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Bratislava, Slovakia.
Source
Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2020 07; 303(7):1901-1934
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Fossils
Lizards - anatomy & histology
Phylogeny
Russia
Abstract
The early middle Miocene (MN 5) lizards from the East Siberian Tagay locality (Baikal Lake, Russia) in Asia are described here. The lizard fauna consists of two clades, Lacertidae and Scincidae. The skink material is allocated to Chalcides. While this taxon was previously reported from Europe, it has rarely been observed in the Neogene record with only jaw fragments and frontal bones described. Its taxonomy was therefore enigmatic. The Tagay material is almost identical to the European fossils of Chalcides from Austria and Hungary, but it also contains the parietal bone. While the material is also similar to the extant Ch. ocellatus, it exhibits several morphological differences. A new species is therefore erected-Chalcides augei sp. nov. These findings further support the connection of the Baikal Lake area with central Europe during the first half of the Miocene. The comparative anatomy of the frontals, parietals and lower jaws was evaluated by micro-CT in selected skink taxa. This comparison highlights several important differences, for example, paired frontals are present in Broadleysaurus (an outgroup taxon), in Acontias and all studied members of Scincidae herein. The character optimization in Mesquite supports fused frontals as being the condition at the basal node of the Ateuchosauridae + Sphenomorphidae + Eugongylidae + Lygosomidae + Egerniidae + Mabuyidae clade. While the parapineal foramen is restricted to the parietal in most taxa studied herein, it is absent (or vestigial) in Acontias and Feylinia. In contrast to all other skinks, this foramen is located on the frontal in Ateuchosaurus chinensis. Anat Rec, 2019. © 2019 American Association for Anatomy Anat Rec, 303:1901-1934, 2020. © 2019 American Association for Anatomy.
PubMed ID
31595688 View in PubMed
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