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Disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82513
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;21(2):103-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hollman Gunilla
Olsson Anders G
Ek Anna-Christina
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden. gunho@imv.liu.se
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;21(2):103-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antilipemic Agents - therapeutic use
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - etiology - prevention & control
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II - blood - complications - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Self Care - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Xanthomatosis - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is one of the most common genetic metabolic disorders and is associated with a high risk of premature coronary heart disease. Primary prevention directed at lifestyle changes, combined with preventive medical treatment, is the most important way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in individuals with FH. Knowledge about the condition and adherence to drug treatment may facilitate reaching treatment goals. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in patients with FH. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-four patients, more than 18 years of age, with FH were asked to participate. A questionnaire on disease knowledge about FH and adherence to drug treatment was sent to the patients. Response rate was 92% (n = 68). Drug treatment, laboratory results, blood pressure, and smoking were also documented. RESULTS: Most patients knew about cholesterol, prevention, and the reason for drug treatment but were less informed about the risk of genetic transmission and family history. No significant correlation was found between knowledge and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. A significant, negative correlation between adherence and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was found (r = -.354, P
PubMed ID
16601526 View in PubMed
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Fatigue in relation to perceived health: people with multiple sclerosis compared with people in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91738
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Sep;22(3):391-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Flensner Gullvi
Ek Anna-Christina
Landtblom Anne-Marie
Söderhamn Olle
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. gullvi.flensner@hv.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Sep;22(3):391-400
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - classification - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - nursing - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Fatigue is not only a complex phenomenon accompanying different illness conditions but is also a common complaint among individuals in the general population. Among individuals diagnosed with the chronic neurological disease multiple sclerosis (MS), one-third describe fatigue as the very first symptom, however it is invisible to others. When adopting an action-theoretic approach to health, fatigue may be considered to influence the individual's goals of life and subjectively perceived health. The aim of this study was to describe perceived fatigue in relation to perceived health among working-aged individuals diagnosed with MS (n = 155), and in a comparative group of individuals randomly selected from the general population living in the same geographical area (n = 190). A self-report questionnaire including the Fatigue Impact Scale, a checklist of six symptoms, questions covering perceived health and levels of and perceptions of fatigue was used for the data collection. The responses on perceived health were dichotomized into two categories: 'good health' and 'ill health'. Of the individuals with MS, 50% graded their perceived health as ill compared with 18% in the reference group (p
PubMed ID
18840223 View in PubMed
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Malnutrition in a home-living older population: prevalence, incidence and risk factors. A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90846
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 May;18(9):1354-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Johansson Yvonne
Bachrach-Lindström Margareta
Carstensen John
Ek Anna-Christina
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. yvojo@imv.liu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 May;18(9):1354-64
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Depression
Home Care Services
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Malnutrition - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To prospectively investigate and describe the prevalence and incidence of malnutrition among home-living older people, related to demographic and medical factors, self-perceived health and health-related quality of life. Another aim was to find predictors for developing risk of malnutrition. BACKGROUND: Risk factors for malnutrition have previously been identified as diseases, several medications, low functional status, symptoms of depression and inadequate nutrient intake. Most studies are cross-sectionally performed at hospitals or in nursing care settings. DESIGN: A prospective study with a sample of 579 home-living older people, randomly selected from a local national register. Examinations were performed at baseline and yearly follow-ups two to four times. METHOD: Questionnaires validated and tested for reliability, to detect risk of malnutrition (Mini Nutritional Assessment), symptoms of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale-20), cognitive function (Mini Mental State Examination), health-related quality of life (Nottingham Health Profile), well-being (Philadelphia Geriatric Center Multilevel Assessment Instrument) self-perceived health, demographic factors, anthropometry and biochemical examinations. Predictors were searched for through multiple logistic regression analysis with the MNA as dependent factor. RESULTS: The prevalence of risk for malnutrition was 14.5%, according to the MNA. Two risk factors for malnutrition were lower handgrip strength and lower self-perceived health. The incidence of risk for malnutrition at follow-ups was between 7.6% and 16.2%. Predictors for developing malnutrition were higher age, lower self-perceived health and more symptoms of depression. Men with symptoms of depression had a higher risk of developing malnutrition. CONCLUSION: Lower self-perceived health had the highest power to predict risk for malnutrition, with increased number of depression symptoms and higher age as second and third predictors. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: A regular and combined assessment using the Mini Nutrition Assessment, Geriatric Depression Scale-20 and self-perceived health as a base for identifying people in need, is one way to prevent the development of malnutrition.
PubMed ID
19077017 View in PubMed
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Nutritional screening and perceived health in a group of geriatric rehabilitation patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85239
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Nov;16(11):1997-2006
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Söderhamn Ulrika
Bachrach-Lindström Margareta
Ek Anna-Christina
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. ulrika.soderhamn@hia.no
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Nov;16(11):1997-2006
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Geriatrics
Health status
Humans
Nutritional Status
Rehabilitation
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: (i) To perform a nutritional screening using the Nutritional Form For the Elderly and relate the results to perceived health in a group of geriatric rehabilitation patients; and (ii) to compare the screening results and nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation. BACKGROUND: Undernutrition is an under-recognized problem among older patients. Using a screening instrument is a way to detect patients at risk for undernutrition. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study conducted in Sweden. METHODS: A sample of 147 geriatric rehabilitation patients was consecutively included and was interviewed with the screening instrument, questions about background variables, perceived health and health-related issues. Higher screening scores indicate higher risk for undernutrition. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were used. When nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation were corresponding to the content in any of the response alternatives for each screening item, the notes were marked as existent. RESULTS: The screening results showed that 55% of the patients were at medium risk and 14% at high risk for undernutrition. Patients in perceived ill health had higher screening scores than those in perceived good health. Associations were also found between receiving help, perceiving helplessness, not being active and not feeling satisfied and higher screening scores. The content of nine of 15 items in the instrument was mentioned in a number of nursing records. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of older patients at medium or high risk for undernutrition was high. To be at high risk for undernutrition was associated with perceived ill health. Nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation showed deficiencies, indicating that all patients at medium or high risk for undernutrition were not identified. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results suggest that nurses need a screening instrument to highlight older nutritional at-risk patients in need of further awareness and investigation.
PubMed ID
17331091 View in PubMed
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Self-care among persons using advanced medical technology at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94276
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 Oct;18(20):2809-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Fex Angelika
Ek Anna-Christina
Söderhamn Olle
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden. angelika.fex@hv.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 Oct;18(20):2809-17
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIM: This study aimed to describe lived experiences of self-care among persons using advanced medical technology at home. BACKGROUND: An increased number of people are performing self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home. Knowledge of different patient groups' lived experiences of this situation may be useful for nurses and other caregivers in educating and supporting these patients. DESIGN: A qualitative design was used. METHODS: Suitable patients in western Sweden were informed by their nurses and invited to participate. Ten people, who performed self-care at home, either while using long-term oxygen therapy from a ventilator or oxygen cylinder, or while performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using a descriptive phenomenological methodology. RESULTS: Prerequisites for self-care when using advanced medical technology at home were: support from professional caregivers and significant others; cognitive capacity; and a positive attitude to life. This type of self-care contains steps for living healthy, for planning and for adjusting technology. It involves a process of learning and feelings both of being tied up and of feeling free. Additionally, it has influences on the home environment. CONCLUSION: Self-care in this context can be described on a generic level. Self-care is more than mastering the technology; it also means dealing with daily life activities for healthy living, planning for the use of the equipment and activities, having knowledge about bodily signs of good and ill-health, and adjusting treatment according to the circumstances. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Self-care in this context involves a learning process with education and continuing access to support from professional caregivers. With knowledge and support, patients are able to assume substantial responsibility for self-care. Needs for design improvements of medical technology for use at home are raised.
PubMed ID
19747254 View in PubMed
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The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure in community resident homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93642
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 May;17(9):1211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Wikby Kerstin
Ek Anna-Christina
Christensson Lennart
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University College of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. kerstin.wikby@telia.com
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 May;17(9):1211-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Residential Facilities
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVITIES: The aims were to test internal consistency and interrater reliability of Mini Nutritional Assessment during implementation of Mini Nutritional Assessment in community residential homes and to test sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic predictivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form vs. Mini Nutritional Assessment. BACKGROUND: There is a need in clinical practice to assess nutritional status in older people and to identify those who could benefit from early intervention. METHODS: The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure (Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form and Mini Nutritional Assessment) was used in 127 older people admitted to eight residential homes. In three of those homes (A, B and C), registered nurses simultaneously performed the assessment procedure, after receiving education and training. The intention was to offer the registered nurses a tool for independent practice use. RESULTS: Internal consistency was 0.68 (Cronbach's alpha) (n = 127). In residential home A, B and C, the registered nurses carried out Mini Nutritional Assessment in 45 residents out of 68. The agreement level between the author's and the registered nurses' assessments was 62% (kappa 0.41). In residential home A, B and C, the agreement level was 89%, 89% and 44%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic predictivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form vs. Mini Nutritional Assessment were 89%, 82% and 92%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The two-step Mini Nutritional Assessment procedure seems to be a useful tool to identify residents in need of nutritional interventions, despite the registered nurses not carrying out Mini Nutritional Assessment in all residents and the low agreement in residential home C. It indicates that to implement and use Mini Nutritional Assessment in nursing care demands the creating necessary staff resources, such as adequate staffing, sufficient education and continual supervision. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Because of the high sensitivity of Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form and Mini Nutritional Assessment, Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form alone might be sufficient for practice use, as its simplicity might increase its usefulness.
PubMed ID
18266849 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.