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Are adverse pregnancy outcomes risk factors for development of end-stage renal disease in women with diabetes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96871
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 May 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2010
Author
Miriam K Sandvik
Bjarne M Iversen
Lorentz M Irgens
Rolv Skjaerven
Torbjørn Leivestad
Eirik Søfteland
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Author Affiliation
1Renal Research Group, Institute of Medicine.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 May 20;
Date
May-20-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background. It is unknown whether adverse pregnancy-related outcomes in women with pregestational diabetes are associated with later development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death. Methods. We linked data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway with data from the Norwegian Renal Registry and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Data from up to three pregnancies for women with a first singleton delivery from 1967 to 1994 were included and analysed in a cohort design using Cox regression. Results. Altogether, 639 018 women were included in the analyses, among whom 2204 women had diabetes mellitus before pregnancy. Their first pregnancy was complicated by pre-eclampsia in 13.2%, low birth weight offspring (
PubMed ID
20494895 View in PubMed
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Checklists in the operating room: Help or hurdle? A qualitative study on health workers' experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138498
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:342
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Oyvind Thomassen
Guttorm Brattebø
Jon-Kenneth Heltne
Eirik Søfteland
Ansgar Espeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. oyvt@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:342
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - manpower - standards
Attitude of Health Personnel
Checklist
Focus Groups
Hospitals, Teaching - standards
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Norway
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Operating Rooms
Physicians
Qualitative Research
Surgery Department, Hospital - manpower - standards
Abstract
Checklists have been used extensively as a cognitive aid in aviation; now, they are being introduced in many areas of medicine. Although few would dispute the positive effects of checklists, little is known about the process of introducing this tool into the health care environment. In 2008, a pre-induction checklist was implemented in our anaesthetic department; in this study, we explored the nurses' and physicians' acceptance and experiences with this checklist.
Focus group interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of checklist users (nurses and physicians) from the Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care in a tertiary teaching hospital. The interviews were analysed qualitatively using systematic text condensation.
Users reported that checklist use could divert attention away from the patient and that it influenced workflow and doctor-nurse cooperation. They described senior consultants as both sceptical and supportive; a head physician with a positive attitude was considered crucial for successful implementation. The checklist improved confidence in unfamiliar contexts and was used in some situations for which it was not intended. It also revealed insufficient equipment standardisation.
Our findings suggest several issues and actions that may be important to consider during checklist use and implementation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21171967 View in PubMed
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Effect of the World Health Organization checklist on patient outcomes: a stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263457
Source
Ann Surg. 2015 May;261(5):821-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Arvid Steinar Haugen
Eirik Søfteland
Stian K Almeland
Nick Sevdalis
Barthold Vonen
Geir E Eide
Monica W Nortvedt
Stig Harthug
Source
Ann Surg. 2015 May;261(5):821-8
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Checklist
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Community - standards
Hospitals, Teaching - standards
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway
Patient Outcome Assessment
Postoperative Complications - prevention & control
World Health Organization
Abstract
We hypothesized reduction of 30 days' in-hospital morbidity, mortality, and length of stay postimplementation of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC).
Reductions of morbidity and mortality have been reported after SSC implementation in pre-/postdesigned studies without controls. Here, we report a randomized controlled trial of the SSC.
A stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2 hospitals. We examined effects on in-hospital complications registered by International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision codes, length of stay, and mortality. The SSC intervention was sequentially rolled out in a random order until all 5 clusters-cardiothoracic, neurosurgery, orthopedic, general, and urologic surgery had received the Checklist. Data were prospectively recorded in control and intervention stages during a 10-month period in 2009-2010.
A total of 2212 control procedures were compared with 2263 SCC procedures. The complication rates decreased from 19.9% to 11.5% (P
Notes
Comment In: Ann Surg. 2015 May;261(5):829-3025647061
PubMed ID
24824415 View in PubMed
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HbA1c versus oral glucose tolerance test as a method to diagnose diabetes mellitus in vascular surgery patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261484
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2013;12:79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Iren D Hjellestad
Marianne C Astor
Roy M Nilsen
Eirik Søfteland
Torbjørn Jonung
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2013;12:79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Peripheral Arterial Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Predictive value of tests
Preoperative Care
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM) is based on either fasting plasma glucose levels or an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Recently, an HbA1c value of?=?48 mmol/mol (6.5%) has been included as an additional test to diagnose DM. The purpose of this study was to validate HbA1c versus OGTT as a method to diagnose DM in vascular surgery patients.
The study population consisted of 345 patients admitted consecutively due to peripheral arterial disease. Sixty-seven patients were previously diagnosed with DM. Glucose levels of OGTT and HbA1c values were analyzed in 275 patients. The OGTT results were categorized into three groups according to the World Health Organization 1999 criteria: 1) DM defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG)?=?7.0 mmol/L and/or two-hour value (2-h-value)?=?11.1 mmol/L; 2) intermediate hyperglycaemia, which consists of IGT (FPG?
Notes
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PubMed ID
23705980 View in PubMed
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Patient safety in surgical environments: cross-countries comparison of psychometric properties and results of the Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140581
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:279
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Arvid S Haugen
Eirik Søfteland
Geir E Eide
Monica W Nortvedt
Karina Aase
Stig Harthug
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Lies vei 65, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. arvid.haugen@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:279
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Confidence Intervals
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Internationality
Male
Netherlands
Norway
Odds Ratio
Operating Rooms - standards - trends
Personnel, Hospital
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Safety Management - methods - trends
Surgery Department, Hospital
Translations
United States
Abstract
How hospital health care personnel perceive safety climate has been assessed in several countries by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS). Few studies have examined safety climate factors in surgical departments per se. This study examined the psychometric properties of a Norwegian translation of the HSOPS and also compared safety climate factors from a surgical setting to hospitals in the United States, the Netherlands and Norway.
This survey included 575 surgical personnel in Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, an 1100-bed tertiary hospital in western Norway: surgeons, operating theatre nurses, anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists and ancillary personnel. Of these, 358 returned the HSOPS, resulting in a 62% response rate. We used factor analysis to examine the applicability of the HSOPS factor structure in operating theatre settings. We also performed psychometric analysis for internal consistency and construct validity. In addition, we compared the percent of average positive responds of the patient safety climate factors with results of the US HSOPS 2010 comparative data base report.
The professions differed in their perception of patient safety climate, with anaesthesia personnel having the highest mean scores. Factor analysis using the original 12-factor model of the HSOPS resulted in low reliability scores (r = 0.6) for two factors: "adequate staffing" and "organizational learning and continuous improvement". For the remaining factors, reliability was = 0.7. Reliability scores improved to r = 0.8 by combining the factors "organizational learning and continuous improvement" and "feedback and communication about error" into one six-item factor, supporting an 11-factor model. The inter-item correlations were found satisfactory.
The psychometric properties of the questionnaire need further investigations to be regarded as reliable in surgical environments. The operating theatre personnel perceived their hospital's patient safety climate far more negatively than the health care personnel in hospitals in the United States and with perceptions more comparable to those of health care personnel in hospitals in the Netherlands. In fact, the surgical personnel in our hospital may perceive that patient safety climate is less focused in our hospital, at least compared with the results from hospitals in the United States.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20860787 View in PubMed
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Patients' and healthcare workers' recommendations for a surgical patient safety checklist - a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307268
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2020 Jan 16; 20(1):43
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-16-2020
Author
Kristin Harris
Eirik Søfteland
Asgjerd Litleré Moi
Stig Harthug
Anette Storesund
Sebastius Jesuthasan
Nick Sevdalis
Arvid Steinar Haugen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Inndalsveien 28, 5063 Kronstad, Bergen, Norway. kristin.harris@helse-bergen.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2020 Jan 16; 20(1):43
Date
Jan-16-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Checklist
Female
Focus Groups
Hospitals, Community
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Participation
Patient Safety
Personnel, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Risk Management
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Tertiary Care Centers
Abstract
Patients' involvement in patient safety has increased in healthcare. Use of checklists may improve patient outcome in surgery, though few have attempted to engage patients' use of surgical checklist. To identify risk elements of complications based on patients' and healthcare workers' experiences is warranted. This study aims to identify what the patients and healthcare workers find to be the risk elements that should be included in a patient-driven surgical patient safety checklist.
A qualitative study design where post-operative patients, surgeons, ward physicians, ward nurses, and secretaries from five surgical specialties took part in focus group interviews. Eleven focus groups were conducted including 25 post-operative patients and 27 healthcare workers at one tertiary teaching hospital and one community hospital in Norway. Based on their experiences, participants were asked to identify perceived risks before and after surgery. The interviews were analysed using content analysis.
Safety risk factors were categorised as pre-operative information: pre-operative preparations, post-operative information, post-operative plans and follow-up. The subcategories under pre-operative information and preparations were: contact information, medication safety, health status, optimising health, dental status, read information, preparation two weeks before surgery, inform your surgical ward, planning your own discharge, preparation on admission and just before surgery. The subcategories under post-operative information, further plans and follow-up were: prevention and complications, restriction and activity, medication safety, pain relief, stomach functions, further care and appointments. Both healthcare workers and patients express the need for a surgical patient safety checklist.
A broad spectre of risk elements for a patient safety checklist were identified. Developing a surgical safety checklist based on these risk elements might reduce complications and unwanted errors.
The study is registered as part of a clinical trial in ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03105713.
PubMed ID
31948462 View in PubMed
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A survey of surgical team members' perceptions of near misses and attitudes towards Time Out protocols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106799
Source
BMC Surg. 2013;13:46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Arvid Steinar Haugen
Shamini Murugesh
Rune Haaverstad
Geir Egil Eide
Eirik Søfteland
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Jonas Liesvei 65, N-5021, Bergen, Norway. arvid.haugen@helse-bergen.no.
Source
BMC Surg. 2013;13:46
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Checklist
Clinical Protocols
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Medical Errors - prevention & control - psychology
Norway
Patient care team
Patient Safety - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
Abstract
Medical errors are inherently of concern in modern health care. Although surgical errors as incorrect surgery (e.g., wrong patient, wrong site, or wrong procedure) are infrequent, they are devastating events to experience. To gain insight about incidents that could lead to incorrect surgery, we surveyed how surgical team members perceive near misses and their attitudes towards the use of Time Out protocols in the operating room. We hypothesised that perceptions of near-miss experiences and attitudes towards Time Out protocols vary widely among surgical team members.
This cross-sectional study (N = 427) included surgeons, anaesthetists, nurse anaesthetists, and operating room nurses. The questionnaire consisted of 14 items, 11 of which had dichotomous responses (0 = no; 1 = yes) and 3 of which had responses on an ordinal scale (never = 0; sometimes = 1; often = 2; always = 3). Items reflected team members' experience of near misses or mistakes; their strategies for verifying the correct patient, site, and procedure; questions about whether they believed that these mistakes could be avoided using the Time Out protocol; and how they would accept the implementation of the protocol in the operating room.
In the operating room, 38% of respondents had experienced uncertainty of patient identity, 81% had experienced uncertainty of the surgical site or side, and 60% had prepared for the wrong procedure. Sixty-three per cent agreed that verifying the correct patient, site, and procedure should be a team responsibility. Thus, only nurse anaesthetists routinely performed identity checks prior to surgery (P = 0.001). Of the surgical team members, 91% supported implementation of a Time Out protocol in their operating rooms.
The majority of our surgical personnel experienced near misses with regard to correct patient identity, surgical site, or procedure. Routines for ensuring the correct patient, site, and surgical procedure must involve all surgical team members. We find that the near-miss experiences are a wake-up call for systematic risk reducing efforts and the use of checklists in surgery.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24106792 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.