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Assessing Health in an Alaska Native Cultural Context: The Yup'ik Wellness Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263106
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2015 May 25;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-2015
Author
Cécile Lardon
Christopher Wolsko
Edison Trickett
David Henry
Scarlett Hopkins
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2015 May 25;
Date
May-25-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The development and validation of a wellness measure among the Yup'ik of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in western Alaska is presented, with the overarching goal of supporting locally relevant health practices in this Alaska Native population.
A survey containing the wellness measure and several additional psychosocial variables was completed by 493 Yup'ik individuals from 7 different highly rural communities in western Alaska. Participants ranged in age from 14 to 94 (M = 38.55, SD = 17.14), and slightly more than half were female (58.62%).
Individuals who scored higher on the wellness measure reported greater happiness, greater overall health, greater communal mastery, a larger and more satisfying social support network, and coping styles that were more likely to be active, accepting, and growth-oriented, and less likely to involve drugs and alcohol.
This project advances research on the health implications of enculturation by specifying particular patterns of culturally sanctioned beliefs and behaviors that appear most beneficial. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
26009943 View in PubMed
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The qasgiq model as an indigenous intervention: Using the cultural logic of contexts to build protective factors for Alaska Native suicide and alcohol misuse prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297988
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Stacy M Rasmus
Edison Trickett
Billy Charles
Simeon John
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The foundational role culture and Indigenous knowledge (IK) occupy within community intervention in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) communities is explored. To do this, we define community or complex interventions, then critically examine ways culture is translated into health interventions addressing AIAN disparities in existing programs and research initiatives. We then describe an Indigenous intervention based in the cultural logic of its contexts, as developed by Alaska Native communities. Yup'ik coauthors and knowledge keepers provided their critical and theoretical perspectives and understandings to the overall narrative, constructing from their IK system an argument that culture is prevention.
The intervention, the Qungasvik (phonetic: koo ngaz vik; "tools for life") intervention, is organized and delivered through a Yup'ik Alaska Native process the communities term qasgiq (phonetic: kuz gik; "communal house"). We describe a theory of change framework built around the qasgiq model and explore ways this Indigenous intervention mobilizes aspects of traditional Yup'ik cultural logic to deliver strengths-based interventions for Yup'ik youth. This framework encompasses both an IK theory-driven intervention implementation schema and an IK approach to knowledge production. This intervention and its framework provide a set of recommendations to guide researchers and Indigenous communities who seek to create Indigenously informed and locally sustainable strategies for the promotion of health and well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
30714766 View in PubMed
Less detail

The qasgiq model as an indigenous intervention: Using the cultural logic of contexts to build protective factors for Alaska Native suicide and alcohol misuse prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299090
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Stacy M Rasmus
Edison Trickett
Billy Charles
Simeon John
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Adolescent Development
Alaska Natives - psychology
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Female
Humans
Protective factors
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control
Translating
Abstract
The foundational role culture and Indigenous knowledge (IK) occupy within community intervention in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) communities is explored. To do this, we define community or complex interventions, then critically examine ways culture is translated into health interventions addressing AIAN disparities in existing programs and research initiatives. We then describe an Indigenous intervention based in the cultural logic of its contexts, as developed by Alaska Native communities. Yup'ik coauthors and knowledge keepers provided their critical and theoretical perspectives and understandings to the overall narrative, constructing from their IK system an argument that culture is prevention.
The intervention, the Qungasvik (phonetic: koo ngaz vik; "tools for life") intervention, is organized and delivered through a Yup'ik Alaska Native process the communities term qasgiq (phonetic: kuz gik; "communal house"). We describe a theory of change framework built around the qasgiq model and explore ways this Indigenous intervention mobilizes aspects of traditional Yup'ik cultural logic to deliver strengths-based interventions for Yup'ik youth. This framework encompasses both an IK theory-driven intervention implementation schema and an IK approach to knowledge production. This intervention and its framework provide a set of recommendations to guide researchers and Indigenous communities who seek to create Indigenously informed and locally sustainable strategies for the promotion of health and well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
30714766 View in PubMed
Less detail