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Acromegaly and cancer risk: a cohort study in Sweden and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18975
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Jun;13(5):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
D. Baris
G. Gridley
E. Ron
E. Weiderpass
L. Mellemkjaer
A. Ekbom
J H Olsen
J A Baron
J F Fraumeni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7240, USA. barisd@mail.nih.gov
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Jun;13(5):395-400
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acromegaly - complications
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Growth Substances - blood
Humans
Incidence
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Several studies have suggested that patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms, especially of the colon. To further investigate this relationship we evaluated cancer risk in population-based cohorts of acromegaly patients in Sweden and Denmark. METHODS: Nationwide registry-based cohorts of patients hospitalized for acromegaly (Denmark 1977-1993; Sweden 1965-1993) were linked to tumor registry data for up to 15-28 years of follow-up, respectively. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to estimate cancer risk among 1634 patients with acromegaly. RESULTS: The patterns of cancer risk in Sweden and Denmark were similar. After excluding the first year of follow-up, 177 patients with acromegaly had a diagnosis of cancer compared with an expected number of 116.5 (SIR = 1.5. 95% CI = 1.3-1.8). Increased risks were found for digestive system cancers (SIR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.62.7), notably of the small intestine (SIR = 6.0, 95% CI = 1.2-17.4), colon (SIR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.6-3.8), and rectum (SIR = 2.5, 95% CI= 1.3-4.2). Risks were also elevated for cancers of the brain (SIR = 2.7, 95% CI= 1.2-5.0). thyroid (SIR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.8-10.9), kidney (SIR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.6-5.5), and bone (SIR= 13.8, 95% CI= 1.7-50.0). CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk for several cancer sites among acromegaly patients may be due to the elevated proliferative and anti-apoptotic activity associated with increased circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Pituitary irradiation given to some patients may have contributed to the excess risks of brain tumors and thyroid cancer. Our findings indicate the need for close medical surveillance of patients with acromegaly, and further studies of the IGF-I system in the etiology of various cancers.
PubMed ID
12146843 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abuse and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9936
Source
Gut. 2002 Aug;51(2):236-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
W. Ye
J. Lagergren
E. Weiderpass
O. Nyrén
H-O Adami
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. weiye@mbox.ki.se
Source
Gut. 2002 Aug;51(2):236-9
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pancreatitis - complications
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although most epidemiological studies do not support a role for alcohol in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer, an increased risk among heavy drinkers cannot be excluded. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort based on the Swedish Inpatient Register, we analysed the risk of pancreatic cancer among patients admitted to hospital for alcoholism (n=178 688), alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (n=3500), non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (n=4952), alcoholic liver cirrhosis (n=13 553), or non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis (n=7057) from 1965 to 1994. Follow up through to 1995 was accomplished by linkage to nationwide registers. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) express the relative risks by taking the general Swedish population as reference. To minimise the possible influence of selection bias, we excluded the first year observations. RESULTS: Alcoholics had only a modest 40% excess risk of pancreatic cancer (SIR 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.5). Overrepresented smokers among alcoholics might confound a true SIR of unity among alcoholics to approximately 1.4. SIR among alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients (2.2, 95% CI 0.9-4.5) was considerably lower than that among non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients (8.7, 95% CI 6.8-10.9), and decreased with increasing duration of follow up in both groups, indicating that most of the excess might be explained by reversed causation from undiagnosed cancers. Among patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, the increased risk of pancreatic cancer was also moderate (SIR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.8) while no significant excess risk was found among non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis patients (SIR 1.2, 95% CI 0.6-2.2). CONCLUSIONS: The excess risk for pancreatic cancer among alcoholics is small and could conceivably be attributed to confounding by smoking.
PubMed ID
12117886 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and breast cancer risk: the alcoholism paradox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10389
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
H. Kuper
W. Ye
E. Weiderpass
A. Ekbom
D. Trichopoulos
O. Nyrén
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A population-based cohort study of 36 856 women diagnosed with alcoholism in Sweden between 1965 and 1995 found that alcoholic women had only a small 15% increase in breast-cancer incidence compared to the general female population. It is therefore apparent, contrary to expectation, that alcoholism does not increase breast-cancer risk in proportion to presumed ethanol intake.
PubMed ID
10970699 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and risk for cancer of the cervix uteri, vagina, and vulva.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19635
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Aug;10(8):899-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
E. Weiderpass
W. Ye
R. Tamimi
D. Trichopolous
O. Nyren
H. Vainio
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. Weiderpass@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Aug;10(8):899-901
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - complications
Carcinoma in Situ - complications - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Odds Ratio
Papillomavirus, Human - pathogenicity
Papovaviridae Infections - complications
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We conducted a population-based cohort study to analyze the risk of developing cancers of the female genitals among 36,856 patients with a hospital discharge diagnosis of alcoholism (ICD-7: 307, 322; ICD-8: 291, 303; ICD-9: 291, 303, 305A) in Sweden between 1965 and 1995. The follow-up was done by linkages of national registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed based on nationwide specific cancer rates. The first year of follow-up was excluded from all analyses to minimize the impact of selection bias. We found that alcoholic women had excess risks for in situ cervical cancer (SIR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.6-1.9), for invasive cervical cancer (SIR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.4-3.5), and for cancer of the vagina (SIR, 4.6; 95% CI, 2.2-8.5) but not for cancer of the vulva (SIR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4-2.0). The fact that alcoholics had an excess risk also for the in situ cancer suggests that the observed excess in invasive cervical cancer may not only be attributable to less use of Pap smear screening among them. The alcoholic women may be at higher risk for the progression from human papillomavirus infection to a malignant lesion for lifestyle-related reasons (promiscuity, smoking, use of contraceptive hormones, and dietary deficiencies). We conclude that alcoholic women are at high risk for in situ and invasive cervical cancer and for cancer of the vagina.
PubMed ID
11489758 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and risk for endometrial cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10205
Source
Int J Cancer. 2001 Jul 15;93(2):299-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2001
Author
E. Weiderpass
W. Ye
L A Mucci
O. Nyrén
D. Trichopoulos
H. Vainio
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2001 Jul 15;93(2):299-301
Date
Jul-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Alcoholism - blood - complications
Cohort Studies
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Estrogens - blood
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Endogenous estrogens increase the risk of endometrial cancer and are also elevated among women with high alcoholic intake. It is incompletely known, however, whether alcohol intake in general and alcohol abuse in particular increases risk for endometrial cancer. We thus analyzed prospectively the risk for endometrial cancer among 36,856 women hospitalized with alcoholism between 1965 and 1994 through linkages between several national Swedish registers. Compared with the general population, women who were alcoholics had an overall 24% lower risk of developing endometrial cancer, a finding challenging our a priori hypothesis. However, among women below the age of 50 years at follow-up, the mean age of menopause among Swedish women, the risk was 70% higher, whereas the risk among women aged 50 years or more at follow-up was 40% lower compared with the general population. Hence, the effect of alcoholism on endometrial cancer appears to be age dependent.
PubMed ID
11410881 View in PubMed
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Associations between sun exposure and other lifestyle variables in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291742
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2017 Sep; 28(9):985-996
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
R Scragg
S Sandin
M Löf
H-O Adami
E Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Auckland, Auckland Mail Centre, 1142, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand. r.scragg@auckland.ac.nz.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2017 Sep; 28(9):985-996
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sunbathing
Sunburn - epidemiology
Sunscreening Agents
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Swimming
Abstract
Sun exposure is associated with risk of several chronic diseases including cancer. The study aim is to investigate whether sun behaviors are related to other lifestyle risk factors of cancer.
We analyzed data collected in 2003-2004 by self-completed questionnaire from 34,402 Swedish women aged 40-61 years, who comprised 70% of a cohort of originally recruited from a population registry in 1991-1992 (n = 49,259). Participants were asked about annual number of sunburns and annual number of weeks of swimming and sunbathing during 1991-2002, solarium use during 1991-1998 and current sunscreen use.
Compared to non-drinkers, the prevalence ratio (95% CI) in women who drank >10 g of alcohol per day was 1.64 (1.49, 1.81) for having >1 sunburn per year, 1.39 (1.29, 1.51) for swimming and sunbathing >2.5 weeks per year and 1.55 (1.41, 1.70) for using a solarium >1 time per 2 months, adjusting for demographic and lifestyle variables. Tobacco smokers were less likely to report sunburn and to use sunscreen, and more likely to sunbath and use solaria, compared with non-smokers. Physical activity was associated positively with swimming and sunbathing, and with the separate use of solaria and sunscreens, but not with number of sunburns. The lifestyle variables that explained most of the variation in sun behavior were alcohol and smoking.
Our results suggest that alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking are potential lifestyle confounders which should be adjusted in studies investigating the association that sun and/or solarium exposure may have with risk of several cancer sites.
PubMed ID
28710584 View in PubMed
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Body size in different periods of life, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and risk of postmenopausal endometrial cancer (Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20562
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Feb;11(2):185-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
E. Weiderpass
I. Persson
H O Adami
C. Magnusson
A. Lindgren
J A Baron
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Elisabete.Weiderpass@mep.ki.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Feb;11(2):185-92
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To measure the association between endometrial cancer risk and obesity at age 18 and recently, adult weight gain, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. METHODS: We performed a population-based, nationwide case-control study among postmenopausal women aged 50-74 years in Sweden, including 709 incident cases with histopathologically verified endometrial cancer and 3368 controls. RESULTS: Compared to lean women (recent body mass index (BMI), i.e. kg/m2 below 22.5), overweight women (recent BMI 28-29.99) had a 50% increase in risk for endometrial cancer (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1). Obese women (recent BMI 30-33.99) had a 3-fold increased risk (OR 2.9, 95% CI 2.0-4.0), and markedly obese women (recent BMI > or = 34) a 6-fold increased risk (OR 6.3, 95% CI 4.2-9.5). The OR for Type 2 diabetes mellitus was 1.5 (95% CI 1.0-2.1) and for Type 1 diabetes mellitus it was 13.3 (3.1-56.4). The effect of recent BMI was similar for tumors having different degrees of differentiation and myometrial invasion, and did not vary with age, time since menopause, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, and use of contraceptives. Hypertension increased risk only among obese women. BMI at age 18, height, and adult weight change were not independent risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Recent overweight/obesity and diabetes mellitus (Types 1 and 2) are associated with endometrial cancer risk. Hypertension increases risk among obese women.
PubMed ID
10710204 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer and occupational exposures in women in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201844
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
E. Weiderpass
E. Pukkala
T. Kauppinen
P. Mutanen
H. Paakkulainen
K. Vasama-Neuvonen
P. Boffetta
T. Partanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Elisabete.Weiderpass@MEP.KI.SE
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):48-53
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - classification - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Women's health
Abstract
The etiology of breast cancer is not fully understood. Environmental and occupational exposures may contribute to breast cancer risk.
We linked 324 job titles from the 1970 census of 892,591 Finnish women with incidence of breast cancer (23,638 cases) during 1971-1995. We converted job titles to 31 chemical and two ergonomic agents through a measurement-based, period-specific, national job-exposure matrix. Poisson regression models were fit to the data, with adjustment for birth cohort, follow-up period, socioeconomic status, mean number of children, mean age at first delivery, and turnover rate.
For premenopausal breast cancer, medium/high level of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation was associated with a standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-2.5; trend P = 0.03). For postmenopausal breast cancer, we found on SIR of 1.2 (1.1-1.3) for low level and 1.4 (1.1-1.8) for medium/high level of ionizing radiation (trend P = 0.001); and an SIR 1.3 (1.1-1.7) for medium/high levels of both asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers. Aromatic hydrocarbon solvents showed a significant trend for a modest excess of postmenopausal breast cancer.
Our study indicates that occupational exposure to ionizing radiation may be associated with an increased risk of female breast cancer. High-quality studies on environmental and occupational etiology of breast cancer are needed for further elucidation of risk factors.
PubMed ID
10361586 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer risk in male alcoholics in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19566
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Sep;12(7):661-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
E. Weiderpass
W. Ye
H O Adami
H. Vainio
D. Trichopoulos
O. Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. weiderpass@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Sep;12(7):661-4
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms, Male - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between alcoholism and risk of male breast cancer. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study in Sweden of men diagnosed with alcoholism between 1965 and 1995. The cohort was followed up through interlinkages with nationwide registries (the national cancer registry, immigration registry, causes of death registry, and population registry), using the national registration numbers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), calculated using the Swedish national cancer incidence rate as reference, were used as estimates of relative risks. RESULTS: A total of 145,811 men were enrolled into the cohort, contributing 1,499,504 person-years of follow-up. Sixteen incident breast cancer cases were identified, and the mean age at diagnosis was 68 years. We excluded the first year of follow-up (cases and person-years) from the analysis to avoid detection bias. The overall SIR (excluding the first year of follow-up) was 1.1 (95% CI 0.6-2.0). Although based on small numbers we found no indication of a differential SIR according to duration of follow-up, age at cohort enrolment, or age at follow-up (attained age or age at cancer diagnosis). CONCLUSION: The observed associations are not compatible with an increase in breast cancer risk among male alcoholics.
PubMed ID
11552714 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific mortality in a cohort of patients with diabetes mellitus: a population-based study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47700
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;54(8):802-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
E. Weiderpass
G. Gridley
O. Nyrén
G. Pennello
A S Landström
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. weiderpass@IARC.FR
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;54(8):802-9
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A cohort of patients with diabetes mellitus hospitalised in Sweden from 1965 to 1983 was followed up until 1989, by linkages of population-based registers. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR), adjusted for confounding variables, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. After exclusion of the first year of follow-up (to reduce the effect of selection bias), the cohort consisted of 144,427 patients, of whom 92,248 patients died during follow-up. The SMR for all causes of death combined was 2.62 (95% CI 2.58-2.67) among men and 3.23 (95% CI 3.18-3.28) among women. The excess mortality was still evident 20 years after first hospitalisation, but became less marked with longer follow-up time. Patients with presumably insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) had the highest SMRs (10.2; CI 9.5-11.0); however, there was a significant (34%) improvement over time in their mortality risk. We conclude that excess mortality persisted throughout all calendar periods and at all ages, indicating the need for health care prevention measures.
PubMed ID
11470389 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.