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Consumption of dairy products in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: data from 35 955 24-hour dietary recalls in 10 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18551
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A. Hjartåker
A. Lagiou
N. Slimani
E. Lund
M D Chirlaque
E. Vasilopoulou
X. Zavitsanos
F. Berrino
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
A. Aller
P. Amiano
G. Berglund
S. Nilsson
A. McTaggart
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
M. Schulz
B. Hemon
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1122, Blindern, N-0317 Norway. anette.hjartaker@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare the consumption of dairy products in cohorts included in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Data from single 24-hour dietary recall interviews collected through a highly standardised computer-based program (EPIC-SOFT) in 27 redefined centres in 10 European countries between 1995 and 2000. From a total random sample of 36 900, 22 924 women and 13 031 men were selected after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age. RESULTS: A high total consumption of dairy products was reported in most of the centres in Spain and in the UK cohort sampled from the general population, as well as in the Dutch, Swedish and Danish centres. A somewhat low consumption was reported in the Greek centre and in some of the Italian centres (Ragusa and Turin). In all centres and for both sexes, milk constituted the dairy sub-group with the largest proportion (in grams) of total dairy consumption, followed by yoghurt and other fermented milk products, and cheese. Still, there was a wide range in the contributions of the different dairy sub-groups between centres. The Spanish and Nordic centres generally reported a high consumption of milk, the Swedish and Dutch centres reported a high consumption of yoghurt and other fermented milk products, whereas the highest consumption of cheese was reported in the French centres. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate both quantitative and qualitative disparities in dairy product consumption among the EPIC centres. This offers a sound starting point for analyses of associations between dairy intake and chronic diseases such as cancer.
PubMed ID
12639231 View in PubMed
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Source
Br J Nutr. 2000 Dec;84 Suppl 2:S205-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
A. Trichopoulou
E. Vasilopoulou
Author Affiliation
University of Athens Medical School, Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Mikras Asias 75, Athens 115 27, Greece. antonia@nut.uoa.gr.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2000 Dec;84 Suppl 2:S205-9
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Australia
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Denmark
Diet Surveys
Diet, Macrobiotic
Female
Flavonoids - administration & dosage - analysis
Fruit
Great Britain - epidemiology
Greece - epidemiology
Humans
Longevity
Male
Mediterranean Region
Plant Oils
Vegetables
Abstract
Mortality statistics from the WHO database covering the period 1960 to 1990 have provided intriguing evidence that something unusual has been affecting in a beneficial way the health of the Mediterranean population. In recent papers, which evaluated the evidence accumulated over the last three decades, it was concluded that the traditional Mediterranean diet meets several important criteria for a healthy diet. Direct evidence in support of the beneficial properties of the Mediterranean diet has also become available. These data were derived from three studies, which have used a diet score, devised a priori on the basis of eight desirable key features of the traditional common diet in the Mediterranean region. The conclusion of these studies is that a diet that adheres to the principles of the traditional Mediterranean one is associated with longer survival. The Greek version of the Mediterranean diet is dominated by the consumption of olive oil and by high consumption of vegetables and fruits. Antioxidants represent a common element in these foods and an antioxidant action provides a plausible explanation for the apparent benefits. Wild edible greens frequently eaten in rural Greece in the form of salads and pies contain very high quantities of flavonoids-- considerably higher than those found in red wine or black tea. While there is no direct evidence that these antioxidants are central to the benefits of the Mediterranean Diet, indirect evidence from epidemiological data and the increasing understanding of their mechanisms of action suggest that antioxidants may play a major role.
PubMed ID
11242471 View in PubMed
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