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Atrial fibrillation or flutter and stroke: a Danish population-based study of the effectiveness of oral anticoagulation in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47529
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Jul;252(1):64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
L. Frost
S P Johnsen
L. Pedersen
E. Toft
S. Husted
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Sygehus, Denmark. lars.frost@aas.auh.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Jul;252(1):64-9
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy
Atrial Flutter - drug therapy
Cerebrovascular Accident - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Randomized Controlled Trials
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A pooled analysis of randomized trials has shown that oral anticoagulation therapy reduces the risk of ischaemic stroke with 68% in patients with atrial fibrillation. We examined the effectiveness of oral anticoagulation on risk of stroke of any nature (fatal and nonfatal ischaemic and/or haemorrhagic stroke) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation or flutter living in the County of North Jutland, Denmark. DESIGN: Cohort study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We used the Hospital Discharge Registry covering the county (490 000 inhabitants) from 1991 to 1998 to identify 2699 men and 2425 women with atrial fibrillation or flutter, aged 60-89 years. Data on prescriptions of anticoagulation were obtained from the National Health Service. We defined use of oral anticoagulation as date of prescription or reiteration plus 90 days. Patients were followed in the County Hospital Discharge Registry until a diagnosis of stroke (fatal and nonfatal ischaemic and/or haemorrhagic stroke), emigration, death or the end of 1998. We used Cox regression analyses to estimate the relative risk of stroke associated with use of oral anticoagulation compared with no use, adjusted for age, diabetes and underlying cardiovascular diseases. RESULTS: Eight hundred and thirty-eight of 2699 men (31%) and 552 of 2425 women (23%) with atrial fibrillation had one or more recorded prescriptions of oral anticoagulation. The incidence rates of stroke were 31 per 1000 person-years of follow-up in men, and 30 per 1000 person-years of follow-up in women. The adjusted relative risks of stroke during anticoagulation were 0.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4-1.0] in men, and 1.0 (95% CI 0.7-1.6) in women compared with nonuse periods. CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of oral anticoagulation in clinical practice may be lesser than the efficacy of oral anticoagulation reported from randomized trials.
Notes
Comment In: J Intern Med. 2003 Jan;253(1):92-312588541
PubMed ID
12074740 View in PubMed
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Catching the right wave: evaluating wave energy resources and potential compatibility with existing marine and coastal uses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119059
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e47598
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Choong-Ki Kim
Jodie E Toft
Michael Papenfus
Gregory Verutes
Anne D Guerry
Marry H Ruckelshaus
Katie K Arkema
Gregory Guannel
Spencer A Wood
Joanna R Bernhardt
Heather Tallis
Mark L Plummer
Benjamin S Halpern
Malin L Pinsky
Michael W Beck
Francis Chan
Kai M A Chan
Phil S Levin
Stephen Polasky
Author Affiliation
The Natural Capital Project, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America. ckim3@stanford.edu
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e47598
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
British Columbia
Conservation of Natural Resources
Decision Support Techniques
Electricity
Environment
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Oceans and Seas
Renewable Energy - economics
Software
Water Movements
Abstract
Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance the need for profitability of the facilities with the need to minimize conflicts with other ocean uses. Our wave energy model quantifies harvestable wave energy and evaluates the net present value (NPV) of a wave energy facility based on a capital investment analysis. The model has a flexible framework and can be easily applied to wave energy projects at local, regional, and global scales. We applied the model and compatibility analysis on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada to provide information for ongoing marine spatial planning, including potential wave energy projects. In particular, we conducted a spatial overlap analysis with a variety of existing uses and ecological characteristics, and a quantitative compatibility analysis with commercial fisheries data. We found that wave power and harvestable wave energy gradually increase offshore as wave conditions intensify. However, areas with high economic potential for wave energy facilities were closer to cable landing points because of the cost of bringing energy ashore and thus in nearshore areas that support a number of different human uses. We show that the maximum combined economic benefit from wave energy and other uses is likely to be realized if wave energy facilities are sited in areas that maximize wave energy NPV and minimize conflict with existing ocean uses. Our tools will help decision-makers explore alternative locations for wave energy facilities by mapping expected wave energy NPV and helping to identify sites that provide maximal returns yet avoid spatial competition with existing ocean uses.
Notes
Cites: Mar Environ Res. 2010 Jun;69(5):374-8120138659
Cites: Mar Environ Res. 2009 Oct;68(4):151-719560811
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Mar 20;109(12):4696-70122392996
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(1):e3003122253865
PubMed ID
23144824 View in PubMed
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[Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57280
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Oct 6;159(41):6063-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-1997
Author
H. Allermand
E. Toft
C J Jacobsen
B O Kristensen
M. Egeblad
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Skejby Sygehus, hjerte-, lunge- og karkirurgisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Oct 6;159(41):6063-7
Date
Oct-6-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Chronic Disease
English Abstract
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Prognosis
Pulmonary Embolism - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Abstract
Acute pulmonary hypertension has a high mortality at the onset. Patients surviving the first phase will usually recanalize the pulmonary arteries through intrinsic thrombolytic mechanisms and medical treatment. However, in some cases there is insufficient resolution of the emboli with subsequent thrombotic and fibrotic reorganization, leading to a worsening of the pulmonary obstruction. In the open pulmonary arteries the disease may lead to hypertrophy of the media and intimal proliferation, thus leading to a further increase in the pulmonary vascular resistance. This again leads to hypertrophy of the right ventricle and ultimately to right-sided heart failure. Untreated, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension has a five-year mortality approaching 100%, but extensive pulmonary thrombendarterectomy using extracorporeal circulation and deep hypothermia has been shown to lower the pulmonary vascular resistance and thereby improve the prognosis significantly. Operative treatment can now be offered in Denmark, and the purpose of this review is to draw attention to the disease, its symptoms, diagnosis and the surgical treatment.
PubMed ID
9381578 View in PubMed
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The effect of sertindole on QTD and TPTE.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145996
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):385-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
J. Nielsen
M P Andersen
C. Graff
J K Kanters
T. Hardahl
J. Dybbro
J J Struijk
J M Meyer
E. Toft
Author Affiliation
Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. jin@rn.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):385-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Denmark
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Imidazoles - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Indoles - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Long QT Syndrome - chemically induced - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Safety-Based Drug Withdrawals
Schizophrenia - drug therapy
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Torsades de Pointes - chemically induced
Abstract
Recent research suggests that other surrogate markers than QTc, including QTc dispersion and Tpeak-Tend, may better correlate with cardiac arrhythmia risk. While sertindole significantly prolongs the QTc interval, the effects on other markers of arrhythmia risk, such as QTc dispersion and Tpeak-Tend are unknown.
Digital 12-lead ECG was recorded at baseline and at steady-state in 37 patients switched to sertindole. ECG was analysed for Fridericia-corrected QT duration (QTcF), QT dispersion and Tpeak-Tend.
From a baseline QTcF of 407 +/- 22 ms, mean QTcF prolongation during sertindole treatment was 20 +/- 23 ms, P
PubMed ID
20085555 View in PubMed
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Effects of trans- and n-3 unsaturated fatty acids on cardiovascular risk markers in healthy males. An 8 weeks dietary intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53319
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jul;58(7):1062-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
J. Dyerberg
D C Eskesen
P W Andersen
A. Astrup
B. Buemann
J H Christensen
P. Clausen
B F Rasmussen
E B Schmidt
T. Tholstrup
E. Toft
S. Toubro
S. Stender
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark. jdcon@post4.tele.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jul;58(7):1062-70
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Double-Blind Method
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Heart Rate - drug effects - physiology
Humans
Lipoproteins - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Trans Fatty Acids - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies of long-term intake of industrially produced trans fatty acids (TFA) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) suggest opposite effects on cardiovascular disease risk. Common mechanisms of action are probable. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects on cardiovascular risk markers of dietary enrichment with TFA or n-3 PUFA. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, parallel intervention trial. SETTING: Department of Human Nutrition, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University. SUBJECTS: In all, 87 healthy males included, 79 completed. INTERVENTION: Subjects were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of a daily intake of 33 g of experimental fats from either partially hydrogenated soy oil containing 20 g of TFA, 12 g of fish oil with approximately 4 g of n-3 PUFA and 21 g of control fat, or 33 g of control fat. The experimental fats were incorporated into bakery products. Plasma lipids, blood pressure, heart rate variability (HRV), arterial dilatory capacity, compliance, and distensibility were recorded before and after intervention and at follow-up 12 weeks after the intervention. RESULTS: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) decreased in the TFA group and triglycerides and mean arterial blood pressure decreased in the n-3 PUFA group compared to the control group. HRV, arterial dilatory capacity, compliance, and distensibility were unchanged. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the association between coronary heart disease risk and intake of TFA and n-3 PUFA relates only modestly to changes in traditional risk markers. SPONSORSHIP: Danish Medical Research Council (Grant no. 22-01-0390), Center of Advanced Food Research (Copenhagen, Denmark) (Grant no. KVL-R-2001-107), the Danish Heart Association (Grant no. 99-2-3-45-22748), Novozymes (Bagsvaerd, Denmark), Aarhus Olie (Aarhus, Denmark), and from private sources. The experimental fats were provided by Pronova Biocare (Aalesund, Norway) and Aarhus Olie (Aarhus, Denmark).
PubMed ID
15220949 View in PubMed
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N-3 fatty acids and cardiac function after myocardial infarction in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53849
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Aug;60(3):360-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
H A Skou
E. Toft
J H Christensen
J B Hansen
J. Dyerberg
E B Schmidt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Hjørring Hospital, Denmark. helleskou@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Aug;60(3):360-5
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Schedule
Echocardiography
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Probability
Reference Values
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology
Abstract
In order to evaluate the effect of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) on systolic left ventricular function, we investigated the effect of daily supplementation with 5.2 g n-3 PUFA for 12 weeks in 55 patients with a recent myocardial infarction in a double blind placebo-controlled design. Left ventricular function was assessed by transthoracal echo-cardiography and plasma concentration of proANP and N-terminal proANP. No effect of n-3 PUFA could be demonstrated on these indices of left ventricular function.
PubMed ID
11590875 View in PubMed
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Use of lipid-lowering drugs during 1991-98 in Northern Jutland, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193239
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;52(3):307-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
S. Riahi
K. Fonager
E. Toft
L. Hvilsted-Rasmussen
J. Bendsen
S. Paaske Johnsen
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. samriahi@dadlnet.dk
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;52(3):307-11
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Abstract
To examine a) the use of lipid-lowering drugs in North Jutland County in Denmark from 1991 to 1998 and b) the pattern of usage according to sex and age.
We used the Pharmaco-Epidemiological Prescription Database in the county to identify all reimbursed prescriptions for lipid-lowering therapy from 1991 to 1998. One-year incidence rates (IR) and prevalence (P) of the use of lipid-lowering drugs were calculated. Both IR and P of patients in lipid-lowering therapy were stable until 1994, with the IR below 100 per 100 000 for both sexes. The IR then increased from 59.9 to 236.5 per 100 000 person-years in 1998 for women, and from 88.6 to 322.8 per 100 000 person-years for men. The utilization patterns were identical between the sexes. Thus, in both women and men the highest prevalence and incidence rates of lipid-lowering drug therapy were seen in the 60-69-year-olds. Furthermore, the marked increase in both prevalence and incidence of persons on lipid-lowering drug therapy between 1994 and 1998 was the result of an increased number of prescriptions in the 50-59, 60-69 and 70 + years olds, in both women and men. There was a remarkable 4-5 fold increase in the numbers of new patients who received statins during the same period.
The overall use of lipid-lowering drugs has increased markedly over the last few years in Northern Jutland, Denmark. The increase began following publication of the first major trial documenting the benefit of therapy with statins.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11560563 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.