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Glyceryltrinitrate as a problem in industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12838
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1984;173:81-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
E. Sivertsen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1984;173:81-4
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Female
Headache - chemically induced
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Nitroglycerin - adverse effects - blood
Norway
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Pulse - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Absorption
Abstract
Workers engaged in manufacture and use of dynamite experience acute toxic reactions with headache during work, weakness at the end of the working day, tachycardia and hypotension. Sudden death has been reported in dynamite workers after 2-4 days freedom of exposure, possibly due to rebound vasoconstriction resulting in acute hypertension or myocardial ischemia. In the present study 12 volunteers were examined before and during GTN exposure. Most of them experienced headache during work, and a slight but significant rise in heart rate and a fall in systolic blood pressure was found. In serial blood samples from cubital vein very high concentrations of GTN were detected. These high values can be explained by local absorption through the skin of the hand and the lower arm, and do not reflect the mixed venous plasma concentrations. Great interindividual variations were found in GTN plasma concentrations during work, probably indicating different working habits.
PubMed ID
6442006 View in PubMed
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Outcome of pregnancy in one Norwegian county 3 years prior to and 3 years subsequent to the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62243
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):277-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
M. Ulstein
T S Jensen
L M Irgens
R T Lie
E. Sivertsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):277-80
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - statistics & numerical data
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Accidents
Birth rate
Female
Food Contamination, Radioactive - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
USSR
Abstract
Pregnancy outcome was studied in a county in Norway 3 years prior to and 3 years subsequent to the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident on 26th April 1986. More detailed analyses have been performed for the 12 months prior to and subsequent to the accident. A significant increase in the spontaneous abortion rate the first year after the accident was followed by a slight decrease during the second and third years, but figures were still higher than the period prior to the accident. The rate of legal abortions was unchanged. During the entire observation period the number of births increased continuously, with the exception of a decrease in the last 2 months of 1986 and the first month of 1987. A higher incidence of spontaneous abortions was found for pregnancies conceived during the first 3 months after the accident. This increase in the spontaneous abortion rate is noteworthy, and more especially its long-term persistence, which cannot be the result of external radiation. The internal radiation from food polluted by radioactive fallout is a possible explanation. Changes in nutrition in order to avoid polluted food may also be of importance.
PubMed ID
2244456 View in PubMed
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[Pregnancy outcome in some Norwegian counties before and after the Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65228
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Jan 30;110(3):359-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1990
Author
M. Ulstein
T S Jensen
L M Irgens
R T Lie
E. Sivertsen
F E Skjeldestad
Author Affiliation
Kvinneklinikken, Haukeland sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Jan 30;110(3):359-62
Date
Jan-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Air Pollutants
Air Pollutants, Radioactive
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Norway
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The outcome of pregnancies in six countries in Norway has been studied during 12 months prior and subsequent to the Chernobyl accident. The accident took place in a period with an annual increase of births of approximately 3%. However, the year after the accident a decrease of 0.7% was observed with particularly low numbers during February--April 1987. Concomitantly, the miscarriage fraction of all pregnancies increased by 16.3% and particularly during November 1986--January 1987. The same pattern was found when observations from Haukeland Hospital were analyzed separately. When the time of conception was taken into consideration we found that conceptions during the period May--July 1986 ended more often as miscarriages. We have no explanation of the observations. The external radiation exposure seems too small to have produced these effects. The internal radiation from food may have played a role. People may also have changed their food intake, using less vegetables, due to fear of these being polluted by radioactive fallout.
PubMed ID
2309180 View in PubMed
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Sudden infant death syndrome during weekends and holidays in Norway in 1967-1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59885
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990;18(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
B. Kaada
E. Sivertsen
Author Affiliation
Rogaland Central Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990;18(1):17-23
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Female
Holidays
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Population Density
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Rural Population
Seasons
Sudden Infant Death - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
A few previous studies have revealed an increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) during weekends and holidays suggesting environmental factors as potential trigger mechanisms for death. In the present study, the weekend/holiday effect has been assessed on the basis of 1480 SIDS cases in 19 Norwegian counties during a 19-year period (1967-85). The phenomenon has been confirmed for 17 of the 19 counties. Special attention has been attached to differences in the geographical and seasonal distribution of the phenomenon. Deaths of other causes in infancy did not display such a dependency on the day of the week.
PubMed ID
2320975 View in PubMed
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