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Association of Intracranial Aneurysms With Aortic Aneurysms in 125 Patients With Fusiform and 4253 Patients With Saccular Intracranial Aneurysms and Their Family Members and Population Controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308930
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2019 09 17; 8(18):e013277
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-17-2019
Author
Arttu Kurtelius
Nelli Väntti
Behnam Rezai Jahromi
Olli Tähtinen
Hannu Manninen
Juha Koskenvuo
Riikka Tulamo
Satu Kotikoski
Heidi Nurmonen
Olli-Pekka Kämäräinen
Terhi Huttunen
Jukka Huttunen
Mikael von Und Zu Fraunberg
Timo Koivisto
Juha E Jääskeläinen
Antti E Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Neurosurgery NeuroCenter Kuopio University Hospital Kuopio Finland.
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2019 09 17; 8(18):e013277
Date
09-17-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aneurysm, Dissecting - epidemiology
Aneurysm, Ruptured - epidemiology
Aortic Aneurysm - epidemiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Cerebral Angiography
Collagen Type V - genetics
Collagen Type XI - genetics
Family
Female
Fibrillin-1 - genetics
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intracranial Aneurysm - classification - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Myosin Heavy Chains - genetics
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
Background Varying degrees of co-occurrence of intracranial aneurysms (IA) and aortic aneurysms (AA) have been reported. We sought to compare the risk for AA in fusiform intracranial aneurysms (fIA) and saccular intracranial aneurysms (sIA) disease and evaluate possible genetic connection between the fIA disease and AAs. Additionally, the characteristics and aneurysms of the fIA and sIA patients were compared. Methods and Results The Kuopio Intracranial Aneurysm Database includes all 4253 sIA and 125 fIA patients from its Eastern Finnish catchment population, and 13 009 matched population controls and 18 455 first-degree relatives to the IA patients were identified, and the Finnish national registers were used to identify the individuals with AA. A total of 33 fIA patients were studied using an exomic gene panel of 37 genes associated with AAs. Seventeen (14.4%) fIA patients and 48 (1.2%) sIA patients had a diagnosis of AA. Both fIA and sIA patients had AAs significantly more often than their controls (1.2% and 0.5%) or relatives (0.9% and 0.3%). In a competing risks Cox regression model, the presence of fIA was the strongest risk factor for AA (subdistribution hazard ratio 7.6, 95% CI 3.9-14.9, P
PubMed ID
31538843 View in PubMed
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Climate change: present and future risks to health, and necessary responses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101668
Source
J Intern Med. 2011 Jun 17;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-17-2011
Author
A J McMichael
E. Lindgren
Author Affiliation
From the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2011 Jun 17;
Date
Jun-17-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract. McMichael AJ, Lindgren E (The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden). Climate change: present and future risks to health: and necessary responses (Review). J Intern Med 2011; doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02415.x. Recent observed changes in Earth's climate, to which humans have contributed substantially, are affecting various health outcomes. These include altered distributions of some infectious disease vectors (ticks at high latitudes, malaria mosquitoes at high altitudes), and an uptrend in extreme weather events and associated deaths, injuries and other health outcomes. Future climate change, if unchecked, will have increasing, mostly adverse, health impacts - both direct and indirect. Climate change will amplify health problems in vulnerable regions, influence infectious disease emergence, affect food yields and nutrition, increase risks of climate-related disasters and impair mental health. The health sector should assist society understand the risks to health and the needed responses.
PubMed ID
21682780 View in PubMed
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Clinical/serological outcome in humans bitten by Babesia species positive Ixodes ricinus ticks in Sweden and on the Åland Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306003
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2020 07; 11(4):101455
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
P Wilhelmsson
M Lövmar
K A Krogfelt
H V Nielsen
P Forsberg
P E Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Division of Inflammation and Infection, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Microbiology, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.wilhelmsson@liu.se.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2020 07; 11(4):101455
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The risk of contracting babesiosis after a tick bite in Sweden and on the Åland Islands, Finland, is unknown. We investigated clinical and serological outcomes in people bitten by Ixodes ricinus ticks positive for Babesia species. Ticks, blood and questionnaires were obtained from study participants in Sweden and on the Åland Islands. Sixty-five of 2098 (3.1 %) ticks were positive by real-time PCR. Three Babesia species were detected, Babesia microti (n = 33), B. venatorum (n = 27) and B. capreoli (n = 5), the latter species not known to cause human infection. Half (46 %) of the Babesia PCR-positive ticks also contained Borrelia spp. Fifty-three participants bitten by a Babesia PCR-positive tick and a control group bitten by a Babesia PCR-negative tick were tested for B. microti IgG antibodies by IFA. The overall seroprevalence was 4.4 %, but there was no significant difference between the groups. None of the participants seroconverted and no participant with a Babesia PCR-positive tick sought medical care or reported symptoms suggestive of babesiosis. Given the prevalence of Babesia in I. ricinus ticks in southern Sweden and on the Åland Islands, babesiosis should be considered a possible diagnosis in symptomatic residents who seek medical care following tick exposure.
PubMed ID
32386909 View in PubMed
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Clinical/serological outcome in humans bitten by Babesia species positive Ixodes ricinus ticks in Sweden and on the Åland Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311015
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2020 07; 11(4):101455
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
P Wilhelmsson
M Lövmar
K A Krogfelt
H V Nielsen
P Forsberg
P E Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Division of Inflammation and Infection, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Microbiology, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.wilhelmsson@liu.se.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2020 07; 11(4):101455
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Asymptomatic Infections
Babesia - isolation & purification
Babesiosis - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Ixodes - growth & development - parasitology
Larva - growth & development - parasitology
Male
Middle Aged
Nymph - growth & development - parasitology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The risk of contracting babesiosis after a tick bite in Sweden and on the Åland Islands, Finland, is unknown. We investigated clinical and serological outcomes in people bitten by Ixodes ricinus ticks positive for Babesia species. Ticks, blood and questionnaires were obtained from study participants in Sweden and on the Åland Islands. Sixty-five of 2098 (3.1 %) ticks were positive by real-time PCR. Three Babesia species were detected, Babesia microti (n = 33), B. venatorum (n = 27) and B. capreoli (n = 5), the latter species not known to cause human infection. Half (46 %) of the Babesia PCR-positive ticks also contained Borrelia spp. Fifty-three participants bitten by a Babesia PCR-positive tick and a control group bitten by a Babesia PCR-negative tick were tested for B. microti IgG antibodies by IFA. The overall seroprevalence was 4.4 %, but there was no significant difference between the groups. None of the participants seroconverted and no participant with a Babesia PCR-positive tick sought medical care or reported symptoms suggestive of babesiosis. Given the prevalence of Babesia in I. ricinus ticks in southern Sweden and on the Åland Islands, babesiosis should be considered a possible diagnosis in symptomatic residents who seek medical care following tick exposure.
PubMed ID
32386909 View in PubMed
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Coronary angiographic findings after cardiac arrest in relation to ECG and comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308836
Source
Resuscitation. 2020 01 01; 146:213-219
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-01-2020
Author
R Lagedal
L Elfwén
M Jonsson
E Lindgren
D Smekal
L Svensson
S James
P Nordberg
S Rubertsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences/Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden. Electronic address: rickard.lagedal@surgsci.uu.se.
Source
Resuscitation. 2020 01 01; 146:213-219
Date
01-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Coronary Angiography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Early Medical Intervention - methods - standards
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - methods
Retrospective Studies
Risk Adjustment - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The relations between specific ECG patterns and coronary angiographic findings in cardiac arrest patients with different comorbidities are not properly assessed. More evidence is needed to identify patients with the highest risk for acute coronary artery disease as a cause of the cardiac arrest. This study aims to describe the coronary artery findings after cardiac arrest in relation to ECG and comorbidity.
A retrospective study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients, with coronary angiography performed within 28 days. ECG on admission, comorbidity, PCI attempts and angiographic findings are described. Data were retrieved from national registries in Sweden.
Among 1133 patients with available ECG and angiography information the mean age was 64 years. The rate of shockable rhythm was 79%. The total incidence of any significant stenosis in cardiac arrest patients without ST-elevation who underwent coronary angiography within 28 days was 71%. The incidence of any stenosis in patients with normal ECG was 62.1% and in patients with LBBB, 59.3%. In patients with ST-depression or RBBB, PCI attempts were made in 47.1% and 42.4% respectively, compared with 33.3% in patients with normal ECG. Among patients without ST-elevation, those with diabetes mellitus and those with initial shockable rhythm respectively, 84.8% and 71.5 had at least one significant stenosis.
Our study suggests, that evaluation of ECG patterns and comorbidities in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients without ST-segment elevation may be important to identify those with a high risk of coronary artery lesions that could benefit from early revascularization.
Notes
CommentIn: Resuscitation. 2020 Jan 1;146:258-260 PMID 31682899
PubMed ID
31560991 View in PubMed
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CPR-related injuries after manual or mechanical chest compressions with the LUCAS™ device: a multicentre study of victims after unsuccessful resuscitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267967
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Dec;85(12):1708-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
D. Smekal
E. Lindgren
H. Sandler
J. Johansson
S. Rubertsson
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Dec;85(12):1708-12
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autopsy
Female
Heart Arrest - therapy
Heart Massage - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pressure
Prospective Studies
Resuscitation - adverse effects - methods
Rib Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Thoracic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The reported incidence of injuries due to cardiopulmonary resuscitation using manual chest compressions (manual CPR) varies greatly. Our aim was to elucidate the incidence of CPR-related injuries by manual chest compressions compared to mechanical chest compressions with the LUCAS device (mechanical CPR) in non-survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
In this prospective multicentre trial, including 222 patients (83 manual CPR/139 mechanical CPR), autopsies were conducted after unsuccessful CPR and the results were evaluated according to a specified protocol.
Among the patients included, 75.9% in the manual CPR group and 91.4% in the mechanical CPR group (p=0.002) displayed CPR-related injuries. Sternal fractures were present in 54.2% of the patients in the manual CPR group and in 58.3% in the mechanical CPR group (p=0.56). Of the patients in the manual CPR group, there were 64.6% with at least one rib fracture versus 78.8% in the mechanical CPR group (p=0.02). The median number of rib fractures among patients with rib fractures was 7 in the manual CPR group and 6 in the mechanical CPR group. No CPR-related injury was considered to be the cause of death.
In patients with unsuccessful CPR after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, rib fractures were more frequent after mechanical CPR but there was no difference in the incidence of sternal fractures. No injury was deemed fatal by the pathologist.
PubMed ID
25277343 View in PubMed
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De Novo Aneurysm Formation in Carriers of Saccular Intracranial Aneurysm Disease in Eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282519
Source
Stroke. 2016 May;47(5):1213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Antti E Lindgren
Sari Räisänen
Joel Björkman
Hanna Tattari
Jukka Huttunen
Terhi Huttunen
Mitja I Kurki
Juhana Frösen
Timo Koivisto
Juha E Jääskeläinen
Mikael von Und Zu Fraunberg
Source
Stroke. 2016 May;47(5):1213-8
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Intracranial Aneurysm - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Formation of new (de novo) aneurysms in patients carrying saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) disease has been published, but data from population-based cohorts are scarce.
Kuopio sIA database (http://www.uef.fi/ns) contains all unruptured and ruptured sIA patients admitted to Kuopio University Hospital from its Eastern Finnish catchment population. We studied the incidence and risk factors for de novo sIA formation in 1419 sIA patients with =5 years of angiographic follow-up, a total follow-up of 18 526 patient-years.
There were 42 patients with a total of 56 de novo sIAs, diagnosed in a median of 11.7 years after the first sIA diagnosis. The cumulative incidence of de novo sIAs was 0.23% per patient-year and that of subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured de novo sIA 0.05% per patient-year. The risk of de novo sIA discovery per patient-year increased with younger age at the first sIA diagnosis: 2.2% in the patients aged
PubMed ID
27026632 View in PubMed
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Expansion of spatial and host range of Puumala virus in Sweden: an increasing threat for humans?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283488
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2017 Jun;145(8):1642-1648
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
O. Borg
M. Wille
P. Kjellander
U A Bergvall
P-E Lindgren
J. Chirico
Å. Lundkvist
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2017 Jun;145(8):1642-1648
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae
Disease Reservoirs - virology
Geography
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Host Specificity
Prevalence
Puumala virus - physiology
Rodentia
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Hantaviruses are globally distributed and cause severe human disease. Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) is the most common species in Northern Europe, and the only hantavirus confirmed to circulate in Sweden, restricted to the northern regions of the country. In this study, we aimed to further add to the natural ecology of PUUV in Sweden by investigating prevalence, and spatial and host species infection patterns. Specifically, we wanted to ascertain whether PUUV was present in the natural reservoir, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) further south than Dalälven river, in south-central Sweden, and whether PUUV can be detected in other rodent species in addition to the natural reservoir. In total, 559 animals were collected at Grimsö (59°43'N; 15°28'E), Sala (59°55'N; 16°36'E) and Bogesund (59°24'N; 18°14'E) in south-central Sweden between May 2013 and November 2014. PUUV ELISA-reactive antibodies were found both in 2013 (22/295) and in 2014 (18/264), and nine samples were confirmed as PUUV-specific by focus reduction neutralization test. Most of the PUUV-specific samples were from the natural host, the bank vole, but also from other rodent hosts, indicating viral spill-over. Finally, we showed that PUUV is present in more highly populated central Sweden.
PubMed ID
28249631 View in PubMed
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The histidine-rich glycoprotein A1042G polymorphism and recurrent miscarriage: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261331
Source
Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2014;12:70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Evangelia Elenis
Karin E Lindgren
Helena Karypidis
Alkistis Skalkidou
Frida Hosseini
Katarina Bremme
Britt-Marie Landgren
Lottie Skjöldebrand-Sparre
Anneli Stavreus-Evers
Inger Sundström-Poromaa
Helena Åkerud
Source
Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2014;12:70
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Habitual - blood - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Amino Acid Substitution
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Homozygote
Hospitals, University
Humans
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pregnancy
Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Sweden
Abstract
Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) has previously been shown to have an impact on implantation and fertility. The aim of this study was to investigate if there is an association between the HRG A1042G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and recurrent miscarriage.
The study was designed as a case-control study and the women were included at University Hospitals in Sweden. 186 cases with recurrent miscarriage were compared with 380 pregnant controls with no history of miscarriage. Each woman was genotyped for the HRG A1042G SNP.
The results indicated that the frequency of heterozygous HRG A1042G carriers was higher among controls compared to cases (34.7% vs 26.3%; p
Notes
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PubMed ID
25064236 View in PubMed
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Hypertension predisposes to the formation of saccular intracranial aneurysms in 467 unruptured and 1053 ruptured patients in Eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259377
Source
Ann Med. 2014 May;46(3):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Antti E Lindgren
Mitja I Kurki
Annamaija Riihinen
Timo Koivisto
Antti Ronkainen
Jaakko Rinne
Juha Hernesniemi
Johan G Eriksson
Juha E Jääskeläinen
Mikael von und zu Fraunberg
Source
Ann Med. 2014 May;46(3):169-76
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Incidence
Intracranial Aneurysm - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Rupture, Spontaneous
Smoking - epidemiology
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - etiology
Abstract
Hypertension associates with subarachnoid hemorrhage from saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA-SAH) when compared to matched controls or general population. Few series compare hypertension in unruptured sIA versus sIA-SAH, so its impact on the sIA disease remains uncertain.
Kuopio sIA Database ( www.uef.fi/ns ) contains all cases of unruptured and ruptured sIAs admitted to Kuopio University Hospital from its Eastern Finnish catchment population. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of drug-treated hypertension in 467 unruptured and 1053 ruptured sIA patients admitted to Kuopio University Hospital from 1995 to 2007, using the national registry of prescribed medicines.
Antihypertensive medication was more frequent in the unruptured (73% versus 62%) with higher age-adjusted incidence. At sIA diagnosis, the sIA-SAH group had more often untreated hypertension (29% versus 23%). The size of unruptured sIAs increased with age at sIA diagnosis, independently of hypertension. Multiple sIAs, familial sIA, and sIA-SAH were not associated with hypertension in multivariate analysis. Results indicate that drug-treated hypertension associates with the formation of sIAs rather than their growth or rupture.
Hypertension is highly prevalent in the carriers of unruptured sIAs when compared to those with ruptured sIA. Hypertension may associate with the sIA formation, and may predispose to the rupture of sIA if untreated.
PubMed ID
24579936 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.