Skip header and navigation

Refine By

24 records – page 1 of 3.

Antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis in middle ear effusion during early phase of acute otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37907
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1990 Jan-Feb;109(1-2):111-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Karjalainen
M. Koskela
J. Luotonen
E. Herva
P. Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1990 Jan-Feb;109(1-2):111-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology - isolation & purification
Otitis Media with Effusion - immunology - microbiology
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
Serum type (IgG, IgM and IgA-class) and secretory type antibodies specific to Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn), Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Branhamella catarrhalis (Br) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 46 serum and 114 middle ear effusion (MEE) samples from 85 children with acute otitis media (AOM). The samples were obtained within 12 h from the onset of the ear symptoms. Serum (but not secretory) type antibodies to the infecting Pn serotype were found in 24% of the MEE samples of the patients with Pn AOM and, correspondingly, serum and/or secretory type antibodies to Hi and Br were seen in 54% and 63% of the MEE samples of the patients with Hi or Br AOM, respectively. Moreover, antibodies against bacteria other than the causative one could also be found in the MEE. The occurrence of the serum type antibodies against these bacteria in the MEE was closely correlated with their serum levels. The findings of this study indicate that during the very early phase of AOM, the MEE contains both serum type antibodies originating from the serum, and secretory antibodies of middle ear origin. Among them there are antibodies specific to the three most common bacteria causing AOM (Pn, Hi, and Br) regardless of the bacterial etiology of the AOM attack in question.
PubMed ID
2106760 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibody response to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57649
Source
J Infect Dis. 1996 Feb;173(2):387-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
U. Sankilampi
P O Honkanen
A. Bloigu
E. Herva
M. Leinonen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department in Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1996 Feb;173(2):387-93
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Capsules - immunology
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Male
Pneumococcal Infections - immunology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Serotyping
Streptococcus pneumoniae - classification - immunology
Vaccination
Abstract
Antibody response to 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine was assessed in 350 subjects (131 men, 219 women) aged 65-91 years. IgG antibodies to pneumococcal serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 19F, and 23F were measured by EIA after blocking of antibodies to cell wall polysaccharide. Antibody concentrations in both pre- and postvaccination sera (mean interval, 35 days) were higher in elderly men than women; in the women, the concentrations decreased significantly with increasing age, but not in the men. Antibody fold increases were good in the elderly, including those > or = 85 years old. The overall percentage of the elderly with antibody concentrations > 1 microgram/mL to the 6 antigens increased by vaccination from 61% to 87%, but in the women > or = 85 years old, only to 75%. Antibody response to 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine was satisfactory in the elderly.
PubMed ID
8568300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antimicrobial resistance in Haemophilus influenzae isolated from blood, cerebrospinal fluid, middle ear fluid and throat samples of children. A nationwide study in Finland in 1988-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216391
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1995;27(1):57-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
A. Nissinen
E. Herva
M L Katila
S. Kontiainen
O. Liimatainen
S. Oinonen
A K Takala
P. Huovinen
Author Affiliation
Antimicrobial Research Laboratory, National Public Health Institute, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1995;27(1):57-61
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Ampicillin Resistance - physiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Capsules - analysis
Blood - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
Child, Preschool
Ear, Middle - microbiology
Finland - epidemiology
Haemophilus Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Pharynx - microbiology
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
A nation-wide survey of the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Haemophilus influenzae was conducted on isolates collected in 1988-90 from middle ear fluid (MEF), blood, or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in infected children or throat samples of healthy children. Altogether 885 strains were examined regarding capsular type b, beta-lactamase production and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ampicillin, cefaclor, erythromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for these strains was determined by the agar dilution method. 99% (578/585) of MEF isolates, 93% (112/121) of throat isolates, but only 6% (10/179) of blood/CSF isolates were not of type b (Hib). The rate of beta-lactamase production was 11.4% among Hib strains, 8.0% among non-type b MEF isolates, and 4.5% among non-type b throat isolates. No increase in the prevalence of beta-lactamase production in H. influenzae has taken place in Finland since the early 1980s. Resistance to ampicillin among strains that lacked beta-lactamase activity was rare (0.2%). Of the non-type b MEF and throat isolates, 5.9% and 2.7%, respectively, were resistant to trimethoprim and 3.6% and 2.7%, respectively, to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance to other drugs was rare (
PubMed ID
7784815 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Finland, 1987-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35325
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1995 May;20(5):1275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
A. Nissinen
M. Leinonen
P. Huovinen
E. Herva
M L Katila
S. Kontiainen
O. Liimatainen
S. Oinonen
A K Takala
P H Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
Antimicrobial Research Laboratory, National Public Health Institute, Turku, Oulu.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1995 May;20(5):1275-80
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Otitis Media - drug therapy - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects
Time Factors
Abstract
A nationwide survey of the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from the middle ear fluid of children with acute otitis media (639 strains) and from throat-swab samples of healthy children (149 strains) was conducted in Finland during 1987-1990. The MICs of penicillin, cephalothin, cefaclor, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and co-trimoxazole were determined by the agar dilution method. Low-level resistance to penicillin (MIC, 0.1-1 microgram/mL) was found in 1.7% of the otitis-related and 1.3% of the healthy-carrier strains. No highly penicillin-resistant strains (MIC, > or = 2 micrograms/mL) were found. Six multiresistant strains were detected, three of them possibly belonging to a previously identified clone present in Finland since 1985. Eighty-five percent of the resistant otitis-related strains, including 9 of the 11 moderately penicillin-resistant strains (4 of which were multiresistant), belonged to the three most common serogroups (6, 19, and 23).
PubMed ID
7620010 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A vaccination would prevent invasive pneumococcal infections in adults].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209591
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(8):689-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

Bacteriology of acute otitis media in a cohort of Finnish children followed for the first two years of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193970
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2001 Jul;20(7):654-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
T. Kilpi
E. Herva
T. Kaijalainen
R. Syrjänen
A K Takala
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2001 Jul;20(7):654-62
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Haemophilus Infections - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - isolation & purification
Neisseriaceae Infections - microbiology
Otitis Media - drug therapy - microbiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Infections - microbiology
Pneumococcal Vaccines - therapeutic use
Recurrence
Serotyping
Streptococcus pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Suction - methods
Abstract
Timely information on the bacteriology of primary, noncomplicated acute otitis media (AOM) may today be needed more than ever, because of the increasing antimicrobial resistance of its major bacterial causes and because of the potential of new pneumococcal and other bacterial vaccines for prevention of AOM.
The study followed 329 children from 2 to 24 months of age at scheduled healthy visits and sick visits at the study clinic. Whenever AOM was diagnosed during the follow-up, myringotomy was performed and middle ear fluid was aspirated for bacterial culture.
At least one middle ear fluid sample was available from 772 AOM events; Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pnc) was isolated in 201 (26%), Moraxella catarrhalis (Mc) in 177 (23%) and Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) in 174 events (23%). The incidence of Pnc AOM peaked at 12 months of age, whereas the incidence of Mc AOM showed the first peak at 6 months and Hi AOM at 20 months. Pnc AOM showed less prominent seasonality in occurrence than Mc and Hi AOM. Hi was a rare cause of the first 2 AOM episodes (13%) but became increasingly common from the third episode on (32% on average).
Pnc, Mc and Hi were almost equally common findings in AOM. Pnc seems to be the most pathogenic of these three, the role of Mc is increasing and Hi is clearly associated with recurrent AOM.
PubMed ID
11465836 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical efficacy of meningococcus group A capsular polysaccharide vaccine in children three months to five years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249561
Source
N Engl J Med. 1977 Sep 29;297(13):686-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-29-1977
Author
H. Peltola
H. Mäkelä
H. Käyhty
H. Jousimies
E. Herva
K. Hällström
A. Sivonen
O V Renkonen
O. Pettay
V. Karanko
P. Ahvonen
S. Sarna
Source
N Engl J Med. 1977 Sep 29;297(13):686-91
Date
Sep-29-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Bacterial Vaccines - adverse effects
Child, Preschool
Clinical Trials as Topic
Finland
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Infant
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Neisseria meningitidis - immunology
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Vaccination - adverse effects
Abstract
We performed field trials in the course of an epidemic in Finland to learn whether Group A memingococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine protects infants and young children from meningitis. The first trial involved 130,178 children between the ages of three months and five years; 49,295 children received the vaccine, 48,977 received a control Haemophilus influenzae Type b polysaccharide vaccine, and 31.906 remained unvaccinated. No cases of meningitis or sepsis caused by Group A meningococci were seen in the first year of observation among the children vaccinated with meningococcal vaccine whereas six occurred among those vaccinated with the H. influenzae vaccine and 13 among those not vaccinated. In the second trial 21,007 children of the same ages received the meningococcal vaccine. No cases caused by Group A occurred among those vaccinated, although five to seven would have been expected within the year. Meningococcal Group A vaccine appears efficacious in young infants and children.
PubMed ID
408682 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical picture of community-acquired Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia requiring hospital treatment: a comparison between chlamydial and pneumococcal pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212745
Source
Thorax. 1996 Feb;51(2):185-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
M T Kauppinen
P. Saikku
P. Kujala
E. Herva
H. Syrjälä
Author Affiliation
Department in Oulu, National Public Health Institute, Finland.
Source
Thorax. 1996 Feb;51(2):185-9
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae
Community-Acquired Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Female
Finland
Headache - etiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Male
Pneumonia, Bacterial - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - diagnosis - drug therapy - immunology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The importance of Chlamydia pneumoniae as a cause of pneumonia has remained controversial. The clinical picture of C pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia was compared during a C pneumoniae epidemic in Finland.
Group I consisted of 24 patients in whom serological testing and bacterial culture indicated an association with C pneumoniae only, group II comprised nine patients with both C pneumoniae and S pneumoniae, and group III consisted of 13 patients with S pneumoniae only.
The patients with C pneumoniae suffered from headache more frequently than the other patients (group I, 46%; group II, 11%; and group III, 15%) and had received antimicrobial treatment more often before admission to hospital (group I, 54%; groups II and III, 0%). The patients with C pneumoniae produced few good sputum samples and had suffered from respiratory symptoms longer than those with S pneumoniae (group I, 10 days; groups II and III, 4 days). C reactive protein values on admission were lowest in group I and highest in group II. The antimicrobial treatment provided in hospital covered C pneumoniae in 36% of cases in group I and 0% in group II, while S pneumoniae was covered in all patients. C pneumoniae and S pneumoniae together were associated with more severe disease and a longer stay in hospital.
Pneumonia caused by C pneumoniae was milder but clinically resembled that caused by S pneumoniae, and required hospital treatment even among young patients. Mixed infections were common and should be taken into account when planning antimicrobial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia. Further studies with more patients are needed to evaluate the severity of C pneumoniae pneumonia.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1989;21(6):681-912617210
Cites: J Infect. 1989 Sep;19(2):127-342809235
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Aug;132(2):248-562372005
Cites: Medicine (Baltimore). 1990 Sep;69(5):307-162205784
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1991 Apr;163(4):757-612010629
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1991;23(2):159-621853163
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1992 Feb;30(2):517-91537929
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1992;24(4):431-61411308
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1993 Sep;12(9):790-18414816
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1993 Sep;17(3):420-58218684
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(4):429-338248741
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1993 Oct;12(10):756-608307044
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1994 May;32(5):1308-117914205
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1994 Jul;19(1):157-607948521
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1990 Apr;161(4):618-252181028
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1978 Jun;117(6):1019-27352206
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1979 Apr;90(4):543-7434631
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 1981 Mar 19;111(1):117-206784973
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1981 Dec;144(6):570-47328328
Cites: Lancet. 1982 Jul 31;2(8292):255-86124681
Cites: JAMA. 1983 Nov 18;250(19):2641-56632163
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1985 May;151(5):832-93886806
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Jul 17;315(3):161-83724806
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1987 Apr;106(4):507-113548522
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol. 1987 Feb;6(1):4-103552663
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1988 Feb;157(2):230-63335808
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1989 Jan;149(1):169-732912405
Comment In: Thorax. 1996 Sep;51(9):9678984717
PubMed ID
8711653 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of beta-lactamase-mediated resistance to penicillin in middle-ear isolates of Moraxella catarrhalis in Finnish children, 1978-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213942
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Nov;21(5):1193-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995

Development of Francisella tularensis antigen responses measured as T-lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor alpha, gamma interferon, and interleukin-2 and -4) during human tularemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57767
Source
Infect Immun. 1991 Jun;59(6):1948-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
H M Surcel
H. Syrjälä
R. Karttunen
S. Tapaninaho
E. Herva
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Infect Immun. 1991 Jun;59(6):1948-53
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Cytokines - biosynthesis
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Female
Francisella tularensis - immunology
HLA-DR Antigens - immunology
Humans
Interferon Type II - biosynthesis
Interleukin-2 - biosynthesis
Lymphocyte Activation - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - immunology
Tularemia - immunology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - biosynthesis
Abstract
The lymphocyte immune reactivity of 12 tularemia patients to Francisella tularensis antigens prepared from the bacterial cell envelope was examined during a 14-week follow-up study. Lymphocyte blast transformation responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to different protein antigens appeared simultaneously 2 weeks after the first symptoms of tularemia, indicating that none of these antigens had any special role at the early phase of immunization. While the lymphocyte blast transformation responses of total lymphocytes to all bacterial antigens were negative in the week 1 samples, continuously growing F. tularensis-specific T-lymphocyte lines were obtained from PBMC at the same time, indicating that an immune response had already occurred. Later, the T-lymphocyte lines and lymphocyte blast transformation responses were similar. Lymphocyte activation among the PBMC was reflected in an increased number of HLA-DR antigen-expressing, CD4-positive T lymphocytes (CD4+ DR+). The mean secretion of soluble CD8 from F. tularemia antigen-stimulated PBMC increased 2 weeks after tularemia onset, but the mean number of CD8+ DR+ T lymphocytes did not vary during the study period and no correlation could be found between the soluble CD8 and number of CD8+ DR+ T lymphocytes. F. tularemia antigen-induced cytokine production was measured from the PBMC supernatants. High levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha were detected from the first week onwards. The highest levels of interleukin-2 and gamma interferon were recorded during the second and third weeks, respectively, after tularemia onset. Interleukin-4 could not be demonstrated in the lymphocyte supernatants.
PubMed ID
1674737 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.