Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

7 records – page 1 of 1.

[Causes of diabetes in children and adolescents. A combination of heredity and environment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34709
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Jul 24;93(30-31):2673
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-1996

Combinations of beta cell specific autoantibodies at diagnosis of diabetes in young adults reflects different courses of beta cell damage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47740
Source
Autoimmunity. 2001;33(2):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
C. Törn
M. Landin-Olsson
A. Lernmark
B. Scherstén
J. Ostman
H J Arnqvist
E. Björk
G. Blohmé
J. Bolinder
J. Eriksson
B. Littorin
L. Nyström
G. Sundkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Carina.Torn@med.lu.sse
Source
Autoimmunity. 2001;33(2):115-20
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autoantibodies - analysis - blood
Autoantigens - immunology
Biological Markers - blood
C-Peptide - blood
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - pathology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Islets of Langerhans - immunology - pathology
Membrane Proteins - immunology
Prospective Studies
Protein-Tyrosine-Phosphatase - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore the natural course of beta cell function in recent onset diabetes, a subgroup (n=157) of all incident cases (n=879) 15-34 years old, 1992-1993 in Sweden, and with positivity for at least one autoantibody of islet cell antibodies (ICA), glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) or tyrosine phosphatase antibodies (IA-2A) were followed prospectively for the first four years with annual analysis of C-peptide. The aim was to relate the course of beta cell function, measured as C-peptide, in early diabetes with the presence of different islet autoantibodies at diagnosis. We found that patients positive for ICA alone (n=11) had significantly higher C-peptide levels both at diagnosis and during the first three years compared with the other patients (n=146; p=0.022, p
PubMed ID
11264790 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of the new ADA and WHO criteria for classification of diabetes mellitus in young adult people (15-34 yrs) in the Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47416
Source
Diabetologia. 2003 Feb;46(2):173-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
H. Borg
H J Arnqvist
E. Björk
J. Bolinder
J W Eriksson
L. Nyström
J-O Jeppsson
G. Sundkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Wallenberg Laboratory, Entrance 46 2nd Floor, Malmö University Hospital, 205-02 Malmö, Sweden. Henrik.Borg@endo.mas.lu.se
Source
Diabetologia. 2003 Feb;46(2):173-81
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autoantibodies - analysis
C-Peptide - blood
Diabetes Mellitus - classification - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - immunology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - immunology
Fasting - blood
Humans
Incidence
Islets of Langerhans - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Societies, Medical
Sweden - epidemiology
United States
World Health Organization
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We aimed to evaluate how an aetiology-based classification, as recommended in the ADA and WHO guidelines for classification of diabetes mellitus, matches clinical judgement in the Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS), a study covering incident cases of diabetic patients aged 15 to 34 years. METHODS: During a 1-year period (1998), blood samples were taken at diagnosis and 4 months (median) thereafter. Patients were classified according to clinical judgement by the reporting physicians and assessments of islet antibodies (ICA, GADA, and IA-2A) and plasma C-peptide. RESULTS: In 1998, 422 patients were registered in DISS. Among the 313 patients participating in the follow-up, most with clinical Type 1 diabetes (185/218, 85%, 95% CI 79-89%) were islet antibody positive (ab+) at diagnosis. In addition, 14 out of 58 (24%, 14-37%) with clinical Type 2 diabetes and 21 out of 37 (57%, 40-73%) with unclassifiable diabetes were antibody positive at diagnosis. Further to this, 4 out of 33 (12%, 3-28%) were antibody negative with clinical Type 1 diabetes and 4 out of 44 (9%, 3-22%) with Type 2 had converted to antibody positive at follow-up. Among those who were constantly antibody negative, 10 out of 29 (34%, 18-54%) with clinical Type 1 and 1 out of 16 (6%, 0-30%) with unclassifiable diabetes had fasting plasma C-peptide concentrations below the normal range (
Notes
Erratum In: Diabetologia. 2004 Jan;47(1):154
PubMed ID
12627315 View in PubMed
Less detail

Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) is the most important factor for prediction of insulin therapy within 3 years in young adult diabetic patients not classified as Type 1 diabetes on clinical grounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47788
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2000 Nov-Dec;16(6):442-47
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Törn
M. Landin-Olsson
J. Ostman
B. Scherstén
H. Arnqvist
G. Blohmé
E. Björk
J. Bolinder
J. Eriksson
B. Littorin
L. Nyström
G. Sundkvist
A. Lernmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Carina.Torn@med.lu.se
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2000 Nov-Dec;16(6):442-47
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autoantibodies - blood
Body mass index
C-Peptide - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - classification - drug therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - classification - drug therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Isoenzymes - immunology
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Differentiation between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in adults is difficult at diagnosis. In this study we tested the hypothesis that autoantibodies at diagnosis are predictive for insulin treatment within 3 years in patients initially not classified as Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: In a nationwide population-based study, blood samples were obtained from 764 patients, all diagnosed with diabetes during a 2-year period. At diagnosis, 583 (76%) were classified as Type 1, 110 (14%) as Type 2 and 71 (9.3%) could not be classified. RESULTS: Among patients not classified as Type 1 diabetes, 52 (47%) of Type 2 and 42 (59%) of unclassified patients were positive for islet cell antibodies (ICA), glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) or tyrosine phosphatase antibodies (IA-2A). These patients (n=94) had lower body mass index (BMI) (p
PubMed ID
11114103 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ketoacidosis in young adults is not related to the islet antibodies at the diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus--a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32788
Source
Diabet Med. 2000 Apr;17(4):269-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
J. Ostman
M. Landin-Olsson
C. Törn
J. Palmer
A. Lernmark
H. Arnqvist
E. Björk
J. Bolinder
G. Blohmé
J. Eriksson
B. Littorin
L. Nyström
B. Scherstén
G. Sundkvist
L. Wibell
Author Affiliation
Center of Metabolism & Endocrinology, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. jan.j.c.oestman@solna.mail.telia.com
Source
Diabet Med. 2000 Apr;17(4):269-74
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autoantibodies - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
C-Peptide - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect
Glutamate Decarboxylase - immunology
Humans
Incidence
Insulin Antibodies - blood
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Male
Protein-Tyrosine-Phosphatase - immunology
Receptors, Cell Surface
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: To test the hypothesis that there is lower prevalence of islet antibodies in subjects with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes mellitus in young adulthood than in children is associated with less severe diabetes at time of diagnosis. METHODS: This investigation was based on a nationwide study (Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden) of 15-34-year-old newly diagnosed diabetic subjects. During 1992-1993, all diabetic subjects (excluding secondary and gestational diabetes) were reported on standardized forms, with information about clinical characteristics at diagnosis. The study examined islet cell antibodies (ICA) by indirect immunofluorescence, and autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), tyrosine phosphatase-like antigen (IA-2A) and insulin (IAA) as well as C-peptide by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Blood samples were available from 78 patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and 517 non-acidotic patients. The prevalence of ICA (63% vs. 57%), GADA (63% vs. 66%), IA-2A (35% vs. 44%) and IAA (20% vs. 15%) were very similar in patients with or without DKA. The median levels of the four autoantibodies did not differ between the two groups. High blood glucose (P
PubMed ID
10821292 View in PubMed
Less detail

Normal weight promotes remission and low number of islet antibodies prolong the duration of remission in Type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47256
Source
Diabet Med. 2004 May;21(5):447-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
A. Schölin
C. Törn
L. Nyström
C. Berne
H. Arnqvist
G. Blohmé
J. Bolinder
J W Eriksson
I. Kockum
M. Landin-Olsson
J. Ostman
F A Karlsson
G. Sundkvist
E. Björk
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Research 2, University Hospital, Entrance 70-3rd Floor, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. Anna.Scholin@medsci.uu.se
Source
Diabet Med. 2004 May;21(5):447-55
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autoantibodies - blood
Body mass index
Body Weight
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - immunology - pathology
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Insulin - administration & dosage
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Logistic Models
Male
Prospective Studies
Remission Induction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: To identify clinical, immunological and biochemical factors that predict remission, and its duration in a large cohort of young adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). METHODS: In Sweden, 362 patients (15-34 years), classified as Type 1 DM were included in a prospective, nation-wide population-based study. All patients were followed at local hospitals for examination of HbA(1c) and insulin dosage over a median period after diagnosis of 5 years. Duration of remission, defined as an insulin maintenance dose 12 months. Among patients with antibodies (ab(+)), bivariate analysis suggested that adult age, absence of low BMI, high plasma C-peptide concentrations, lack of ketonuria or ketoacidosis at diagnosis and low insulin dose at discharge from hospital were associated with a high possibility of achieving remission. Multiple regression showed that normal weight (BMI of 20-24.9 kg/m(2)) was the only factor that remained significant for the possibility of entering remission. In survival analysis among ab(+) remitters, a low number of islet antibodies, one or two instead of three or four, were associated with a long duration of remissions. CONCLUSION: In islet antibody-positive Type 1 DM, normal body weight was the strongest factor for entering remission, whilst a low number of islet antibodies was of importance for the duration.
PubMed ID
15089789 View in PubMed
Less detail

Proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, glucagon and remission in new-onset Type 1 diabetes mellitus in young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99690
Source
Diabet Med. 2011 Feb;28(2):156-161
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
A. Schölin
L. Nyström
H. Arnqvist
J. Bolinder
E. Björk
C. Berne
F A Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 2011 Feb;28(2):156-161
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Diabet. Med. 28, 156-161 (2011) ABSTRACT: Aims After initiation of treatment in Type 1 diabetes, a period with lower insulin requirement often follows, reflecting increased insulin sensitivity and improved insulin secretion. We explored if efficiency of proinsulin processing is associated with the remission phenomenon. Methods Seventy-eight patients with new-onset Type 1 diabetes were followed prospectively for 3 years. Daily insulin dosage, HbA(1c) , plasma glucose, proinsulin, C-peptide, glucagon concentrations and islet antibodies were determined at diagnosis and after 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months. We studied remission, defined as an insulin dose = 0.3 U kg(-1) 24 h(-1) and HbA(1c) within the normal range, in relation to the above-mentioned variables. Results A rise and subsequent decline in plasma proinsulin and C-peptide concentrations was observed. Forty-five per cent of the patients experienced remission at one or more times, characterized by higher proinsulin and C-peptide levels, and lower proinsulin/C-peptide ratios, indicating more efficient proinsulin processing, compared with those not in remission. Non-remission also tended to be associated with higher glucagon values. Patients entering remission were more often men, had higher BMI at diagnosis, but did not differ at baseline with respect to islet antibody titres compared with patients with no remission. Conclusions Remissions after diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes were associated with lower proinsulin/C-peptide ratios, suggesting more efficient proinsulin processing, and tended to have lower glucagon release than non-remissions. This indicates that, in remission, the residual islets maintain a secretion of insulin and glucagon of benefit for control of hepatic glucose production.
PubMed ID
21219422 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.