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The association between nutritional conditions during World War II and childhood anthropometric variables in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30273
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2004 May-Jun;31(3):342-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Angell-Andersen
S. Tretli
R. Bjerknes
T. Forsén
T I A Sørensen
J G Eriksson
L. Räsänen
T. Grotmol
Author Affiliation
Department of Heredity, Hormones, and Lifestyle, Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. elisabeth.andersen@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2004 May-Jun;31(3):342-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Supply
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia - epidemiology
War
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to examine the height and weight in Nordic children during the years around World War II (WWII), and compare them with the nutritional situation during the same period. METHODS: Information on food consumption and energy intake were obtained from the literature. Anthropometric data were collected from the Nordic capitals and cover the period from 1930 to 1960 for ages 7-13 years. RESULTS: The greatest energy restriction took place in Norway (20%), followed by Finland (17%), while Sweden and Denmark had a restriction of 4-7% compared to pre-war levels. The most pronounced effect of WWII on height and weight is seen in Norwegian children, while some effect is observed for the youngest children in Finland. Little or no effect is seen in Sweden and Denmark. CONCLUSION: The Nordic children were affected by WWII in terms of a transient reduction in temporal trends in height and weight, and the magnitude of this decrease was associated with the severity of the energy restriction prevailing in the respective country during the war. These findings warrant further studies of the chronic diseases associated with height and weight for cohorts being in their growth periods during WWII.
PubMed ID
15204349 View in PubMed
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Colorectal cancer survival trends in Norway 1958-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17867
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2004 Mar;40(5):734-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
E. Angell-Andersen
S. Tretli
M P Coleman
F. Langmark
T. Grotmol
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. elisabeth.andersen@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2004 Mar;40(5):734-42
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the pattern of survival for colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC), and to investigate the prognostic factors for the disease. In the analysis, 50993 cases of CRC aged 40-84 years, diagnosed between 1958 and 1997 in Norway, were included. Esteve's relative survival method was used, together with a time trend analysis, conducted by least-squares linear regression. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine cause-specific mortality. Five-year relative CRC survival has increased by an estimated 3% per 5-year diagnostic period. In 1958-1962, relative survival was about 40% for both males and females, and increased to 56 and 60%, respectively, in 1993-1997. Rectal cancer had a higher cause-specific mortality (RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.22-1.30) than proximal colon (reference) and distal colon (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.93-1.00 cancers), while females had a lower cause-specific mortality than males (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.86-0.90). The increase in the relative survival rate in Norway is probably due to improved treatments and advanced diagnostics. Norway has a higher CRC survival rate than the EUROCARE average.
PubMed ID
15010075 View in PubMed
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Trends in incidence of brain and central nervous system tumors in Norway, 1970-1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17779
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2004 May-Jun;23(3):101-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
T B Johannesen
E. Angell-Andersen
S. Tretli
F. Langmark
K. Lote
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Cancer Registry, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. tomj@trollnet.no
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2004 May-Jun;23(3):101-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Spinal Cord Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the incidence of childhood and adult brain and central nervous system (CNS) tumors in Norway from 1970 through 1999. In this period, a total of 14,641 patients were diagnosed with a primary benign or malignant neoplasm of the brain and CNS. Age-adjusted incidence rates were reported together with results of loglinear regression and an age-period-cohort model based on the Poisson regression model. In children (
PubMed ID
15084778 View in PubMed
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