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Alaska Influenza Surveillance Summary, 2015–16 Season.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301023
Source
State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health. Epidemiology bulletin no.22.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 20, 2016
  1 document  
Author
Donna Fearey
Anna Frick
Jayme Parker
Nisha Fowler
Source
State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health. Epidemiology bulletin no.22.
Date
September 20, 2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
75554
Keywords
Alaska
Influenza
Surveillance
Mortality
Documents
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Elevated Blood Lead Levels Among Fire Assay Workers and Their Children in Alaska, 2010-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268187
Source
Public Health Rep. 2015 Sep-Oct;130(5):440-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kimberly A Porter
Cassandra Kirk
Donna Fearey
Louisa J Castrodale
David Verbrugge
Joseph McLaughlin
Source
Public Health Rep. 2015 Sep-Oct;130(5):440-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Epidemiological Monitoring
Family Health
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Information Dissemination - legislation & jurisprudence
Lead - blood
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Metallurgy - methods - standards
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control - standards
Protective Devices - standards - utilization
United States
United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration - standards
Abstract
In October 2010, an employee at Facility A in Alaska that performs fire assay analysis, an industrial technique that uses lead-containing flux to obtain metals from pulverized rocks, was reported to the Alaska Section of Epidemiology (SOE) with an elevated blood lead level (BLL) =10 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL). The SOE initiated an investigation; investigators interviewed employees, offered blood lead screening to employees and their families, and observed a visit to the industrial facility by the Alaska Occupational Safety and Health Section (AKOSH). Among the 15 employees with known work responsibilities, 12 had an elevated BLL at least once from October 2010 through February 2011. Of these 12 employees, 10 reported working in the fire assay room. Four children of employees had BLLs =5 µg/dL. Employees working in Facility A's fire assay room were likely exposed to lead at work and could have brought lead home. AKOSH inspectors reported that they could not share their consultative report with SOE investigators because of the confidentiality requirements of a federal regulation, which hampered Alaska SOE investigators from fully characterizing the lead exposure standards.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26327721 View in PubMed
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Laboratory-based respiratory virus surveillance pilot project on select cruise ships in Alaska, 2013-15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289899
Source
J Travel Med. 2017 Sep 01; 24(6):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-01-2017
Author
Kimberly B Rogers
Shahrokh Roohi
Timothy M Uyeki
David Montgomery
Jayme Parker
Nisha H Fowler
Xiyan Xu
Deandra J Ingram
Donna Fearey
Steve M Williams
Grant Tarling
Clive M Brown
Nicole J Cohen
Author Affiliation
Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
Source
J Travel Med. 2017 Sep 01; 24(6):
Date
Sep-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza A virus - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Nose - virology
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance
Ships
Travel
Young Adult
Abstract
Influenza outbreaks can occur among passengers and crews during the Alaska summertime cruise season. Ill travellers represent a potential source for introduction of novel or antigenically drifted influenza virus strains to the United States. From May to September 2013-2015, the Alaska Division of Public Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and two cruise lines implemented a laboratory-based public health surveillance project to detect influenza and other respiratory viruses among ill crew members and passengers on select cruise ships in Alaska.
Cruise ship medical staff collected 2-3 nasopharyngeal swab specimens per week from passengers and crew members presenting to the ship infirmary with acute respiratory illness (ARI). Specimens were tested for respiratory viruses at the Alaska State Virology Laboratory (ASVL); a subset of specimens positive for influenza virus were sent to CDC for further antigenic characterization.
Of 410 nasopharyngeal specimens, 83% tested positive for at least one respiratory virus; 71% tested positive for influenza A or B virus. Antigenic characterization of pilot project specimens identified strains matching predominant circulating seasonal influenza virus strains, which were included in the northern or southern hemisphere influenza vaccines during those years. Results were relatively consistent across age groups, recent travel history, and influenza vaccination status. Onset dates of illness relative to date of boarding differed between northbound (occurring later in the voyage) and southbound (occurring within the first days of the voyage) cruises.
The high yield of positive results indicated that influenza was common among passengers and crews sampled with ARI. This finding reinforces the need to bolster influenza prevention and control activities on cruise ships. Laboratory-based influenza surveillance on cruise ships may augment inland influenza surveillance and inform control activities. However, these benefits should be weighed against the costs and operational limitations of instituting laboratory-based surveillance programs on ships.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29088487 View in PubMed
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