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Genome Sequencing of Mesonia algae K4-1 Reveals Its Adaptation to the Arctic Ocean.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307560
Source
Front Microbiol. 2019; 10:2812
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Ran Huan
JiaFeng Huang
Dan Liu
Meng Wang
CongLing Liu
YunQian Zhang
CuiPing Yi
Dong Xiao
HaiLun He
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, China.
Source
Front Microbiol. 2019; 10:2812
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The special ecological environment of the Arctic has brought about a large number of salt-tolerant and psychrotolerant microorganisms. We isolated two culturable bacterial strains of the genus Mesonia; one from the Arctic ocean, Mesonia algae K4-1, and one from the tropical sea, Mesonia sp. HuA40. Our genome analysis and phenotypic experiments indicated that Mesonia algae K4-1 is a moderately halophilic and psychrophilic bacterium. Mesonia algae K4-1 can tolerate 3-14% NaCl and grow at a wide range of temperatures from 4 to 50°C. Mesonia sp. HuA40 is a mesophilic bacterium that can only grow with 3-9% NaCl. In addition, the salt adaptation strategy of Mesonia algae K4-1 accumulates organic osmolytes in the cell. RNA helicases, glutathione and organic compatible solutes may play important roles in maintaining the metabolism and physiological function of Mesonia algae K4-1 under cold stress. Moreover, the ability of Mesonia algae K4-1 to adapt to an oligotrophic marine environment is likely due to the synthesis of a large number of extracellular polysaccharides and the secretion of various families of extracellular proteases. This study systematically analyzed the relationship between genomic differentiation and environmental factors of the Mesonia genus and revealed the possible adaptation mechanism of Mesonia algae K4-1 in the extreme Arctic marine environment at the genomic level.
PubMed ID
31866978 View in PubMed
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Global impacts of the 1980s regime shift.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268043
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2015 Nov 23;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2015
Author
Philip C Reid
Renata E Hari
Grégory Beaugrand
David M Livingstone
Christoph Marty
Dietmar Straile
Jonathan Barichivich
Eric Goberville
Rita Adrian
Yasuyuki Aono
Ross Brown
James Foster
Pavel Groisman
Pierre Hélaouët
Huang-Hsiung Hsu
Richard Kirby
Jeff Knight
Alexandra Kraberg
Jianping Li
Tzu-Ting Lo
Ranga B Myneni
Ryan P North
J Alan Pounds
Tim Sparks
René Stübi
Yongjun Tian
Karen H Wiltshire
Dong Xiao
Zaichun Zhu
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2015 Nov 23;
Date
Nov-23-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Despite evidence from a number of Earth systems that abrupt temporal changes known as regime shifts are important, their nature, scale and mechanisms remain poorly documented and understood. Applying principal component analysis, change-point analysis and a sequential t-test analysis of regime shifts to 72 time series, we confirm that the 1980s regime shift represented a major change in the Earth's biophysical systems from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from the Arctic to the Antarctic, and occurred at slightly different times around the world. Using historical climate model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and statistical modelling of historical temperatures, we then demonstrate that this event was triggered by rapid global warming from anthropogenic plus natural forcing, the latter associated with the recovery from the El Chichón volcanic eruption. The shift in temperature that occurred at this time is hypothesized as the main forcing for a cascade of abrupt environmental changes. Within the context of the last century or more, the 1980s event was unique in terms of its global scope and scale; our observed consequences imply that if unavoidable natural events such as major volcanic eruptions interact with anthropogenic warming unforeseen multiplier effects may occur.
PubMed ID
26598217 View in PubMed
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Inflammatory bowel disease: a survey of the epidemiology in Asia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152461
Source
J Dig Dis. 2009 Feb;10(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Kl Goh
Shu-Dong Xiao
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Faculty of Medicine,University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. klgoh56@tm.net.my
Source
J Dig Dis. 2009 Feb;10(1):1-6
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asia - epidemiology
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology - ethnology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Prevalence
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has long been considered a disease that affects predominantly a Western population. The incidence and prevalence rates from Asian populations are much lower in comparison. More recent data, however, have shown significantly higher rates in Asians and time trend studies have shown an increase in the incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) and a similar but lower rise in Crohn's disease (CD). The epidemiological changes that are taking place mirror that of the Western experience seen 50 years previously and seem to occur in parallel with the rapid socioeconomic development taking place in Asia. It appears that certain racial groups are more prone than others to develop IBD. For instance, Indians in South-East Asia have higher rates compared to Chinese and Malays. While there is host genetic predisposition, environmental factor(s) may be responsible for this difference. Migrant studies of South Asians in the UK, where second-generation immigrants have assumed incidence rates as high as the indigenous whites and Asian Jews who develop high incidence rates comparable to Jews from Europe or North America in Israel point to the role of environmental factors. It is unclear which specific factors are responsible. Studies have suggested a change in diet to a more Westernized one may underlie this epidemiological change in the Asian population. It is likely that there are racial groups amongst Asians who are more susceptible to IBD and who will demonstrate a higher frequency of IBD when exposed to putative environmental factors.
PubMed ID
19236540 View in PubMed
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