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Arctic air pollution and human health: What effects should be expected?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49284
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jan 15;160-161:529-537
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1995
Author
Ayotte, P
Dewailly, E
Bruneau, S
Careau, H
Vézina, A
Author Affiliation
Public Health Center (Québec Region), Environmental Health Service, Ste-Foy, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jan 15;160-161:529-537
Date
Jan-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Arctic Regions
Body Burden
Food Contamination
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - adverse effects - analysis
Metals - adverse effects - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Seafood
Abstract
Persistent contaminants such as heavy metals and organochlorine compounds are transported from distant sources to the Arctic by oceanic and atmospheric currents. Natives inhabiting the Arctic can be exposed, because they exist at the highest trophic level of the arctic aquatic food chain, along which biomagnification of contaminants occurs. We reviewed the data available on heavy metal and organochlorine body burden in natives from different regions of Nunavik (northern Québec) and assessed the potential risk of health effects. In addition, we investigated the relationship between each contaminant plasma level and omega-3 fatty acid content of plasma phospholipid, a surrogate measure for aquatic food consumption. Cadmium exposure appears to be unrelated to the consumption of species from the aquatic food chain (r = 0.0004; P = 0.99), whereas PCBs and mercury were (r = 0.49 and 0.52, respectively; P
PubMed ID
7892583 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease risk factors and n-3 fatty acid status in the adult population of James Bay Cree.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189635
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jul;76(1):85-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Dewailly E
Blanchet C
Gingras S
Lemieux S
John Holub B
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research Unit, CHUL Research Center, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Quebec, Canada. eric.dewailly@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jul;76(1):85-92
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Body constitution
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood
Cholesterol - blood
Diet
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Female
Fishes
Humans
Indians, North American
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Phospholipids - blood
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Canadian native populations, which traditionally consume large amounts of fish, have lower rates of mortality from heart disease than do Canadian nonnative populations, which have low fish intakes. Fish oils rich in n-3 fatty acids may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors.
The purposes were to examine the profile of plasma phospholipid concentrations of the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) among James Bay Cree and to verify the relation between these concentrations and CVD risk factors.
The study population consisted of 917 subjects aged 18-74 y who participated in the 1991 Santé Québec Health Survey. Data were obtained through home interviews and clinic visits. Plasma samples were analyzed for phospholipid fatty acid composition.
The mean fish consumption on the day before the survey was 60 g among the adult Cree population. Expressed as a percentage of total fatty acids, relative concentrations of EPA and DHA were 0.65% and 2.80%, respectively. n-3 Fatty acids were higher among coastal residents than among inland residents. A positive association was observed between plasma HDL and n-3 fatty acids. EPA and EPA+DHA were inversely associated with triacylglycerols. Among subjects aged 50-74 y, an inverse association between EPA and EPA:AA and total:HDL cholesterol was observed.
n-3 Fatty acids may favorably influence some CVD risk factors. The Cree population must be encouraged to maintain their traditional fish-based diet, which may be one of the factors protecting them against mortality from CVD.
PubMed ID
12081820 View in PubMed
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Circumpolar maternal blood contaminant survey, 1994-1997: Organochlorine compounds

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4457
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2004 Sep 1;330(1-3):55-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2004
Author
Van Oostdam, JC
Dewailly, E
Gilman, A
Hansen, JC
Odland, JO
Chashchin, V
Berner, J
Butler-Walker, J
Lagerkvist, BJ
Olafsdottir, K
Soininen, L
Bjerregard, P
Klopov, V
Weber, JP
Author Affiliation
Safe Environment Program, Health Canada, PL 0801A2, Ottawa, ON K1A OL2. jay_van_oostdam@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2004 Sep 1;330(1-3):55-70
Date
Sep-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Data Collection
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Insecticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
During the past 20 years a number of studies have found neurological and immunological effects in the developing fetus and infants exposed to background or only slightly elevated levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To address concerns arising from possible increased human exposure in the Arctic and possible effects of POPs, all circumpolar countries agreed in 1994 to monitoring of specific human tissues for contaminants in the Arctic under the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP). Mothers in eight circumpolar countries contributed blood samples that were analysed at a single laboratory for 14 PCB congeners (IUPAC No. 28, 52, 99, 105, 118, 128, 138, 153, 156, 170, 180, 183, 187) and 13 organochlorine pesticides (aldrin, beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH), dichlordiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), diphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), dieldrin, heptachlorepoxide, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), mirex, and the chlordane derivatives alpha-chlordane, gamma-chlordane, cis-nonachlor, oxychlordane and trans-nonachlor). Inuit mothers from Greenland and Canada have significantly higher levels of oxychlordane, transnonachlor and mirex than mothers from Norway, Sweden, Iceland and Russia. Inuit mothers from Greenland also have significantly higher levels of these contaminants than Inuit mothers from Canada and Alaska. These differences among Inuit groups may represent regional dietary preferences or different contaminant deposition patterns across the Arctic. Levels of PCBs are also elevated among some arctic populations due to their consumption of marine mammals and are in the range where subtle effects on learning and the immune system have been reported. The Russian mothers who consume mainly food imported from southern Russia have elevated levels of DDT, DDE, beta-HCH and a higher proportion of lower chlorinated PCB congeners. This study has allowed an assessment of the variation of contaminants such as PCBs and various organochlorine pesticides (DDT, chlordane, etc.) in human populations around the circumpolar north.
PubMed ID
15325158 View in PubMed
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Comparison of maternal contaminant levels in Circumpolar countries: Additional data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296404
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session H12.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
  1 document  

Determinants of change in fat consumption patterns in Nain, Newfoundland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256652
Source
Page 330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Bernier S
Furgal C
Winters K
Dewailly E
The Nunatsiavut Government
Author Affiliation
Nasivvik Centre for Inuit Health and Changing Environments
Source
Page 330 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Diet
Inuit
Food
Fat consumption
Canada
Newfoundland
Nutrition
Health
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls and methylmercury exposure in inuit women of childbearing age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4510
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Sep;109(9):957-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
G. Muckle
P. Ayotte
Dewailly E
S W Jacobson
J L Jacobson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ Research Center (CHUL), Beauport, Québec, Canada. gina.muckle@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Sep;109(9):957-63
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Body Burden
Diet
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Lead - analysis
Methylmercury compounds - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Seals, Earless
Selenium - analysis
Social Class
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to to identify maternal characteristics associated with traditional food consumption and to examine food items associated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury body burden in pregnant Inuit women from Northern Québec. We interviewed women from three communities at mid-pregnancy and at 1 and 11 months postpartum. We measured PCBs, Hg, and selenium in maternal blood; Hg was also measured in maternal hair. The women reported eating significant amounts of fish, beluga muktuk/fat, seal meat, and seal fat. Although consumption of fish and seal was associated with lower socioeconomic status, consumption of beluga whale was uniform across strata. Fish and seal meat consumption was associated with increased Hg concentrations in hair. Traditional food intake during pregnancy was unrelated to PCB body burden, which is more a function of lifetime consumption. This study corroborated previous findings relating marine mammal and fish consumption to increased Hg and selenium body burden. Despite widespread knowledge regarding the presence of these contaminants in traditional foods, a large proportion of Inuit women increased their consumption of these foods during pregnancy, primarily because of pregnancy-related changes in food preferences and the belief that these foods are beneficial during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
11673127 View in PubMed
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The effect of traditional foods on insulin resistance among Inuit in Greenland and Nunavik

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257878
Source
Page 152 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Jeppesen C
Ferland A
Counil E
Dewailly E
Bjerregaard P
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Research in Greenland Directorate of Health and National Institute of Public Health
Unité de recherche en Santé Publique Centre de recherche du CHUL (CHUQ), Canada
Source
Page 152 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic
Canada
Diet
Greenland
Insulin Resistance
Inuit
Obesity
Traditional foods
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 3. Chronic Diseases.
Documents
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Evaluation of the cardiovascular effects of methylmercury exposures: Current evidence supports development of a dose-response function for regulatory benefits analysis

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101173
Source
Environmental Health Perspectives. 2011 May;119(5):607-614
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
  1 website  
Author
Roman, HA
Walsh,TL
Coull, BA
Dewailly, É
Guallar, E
Hattis, D
Mariën, K
Schwartz, J
Stern, AH
Virtanen, JK
Rice, G
Author Affiliation
Industrial Economics Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Health and Environmental Group, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Canada
Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
National Center for Cardiovascular Research, Department of Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Madrid, Spain
George Perkins Marsh Institute, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Office of Environmental Health Assessment, Washington State Department of Health, Olympia, Washington, USA
Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health/Department of Epidemiology, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland
National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Source
Environmental Health Perspectives. 2011 May;119(5):607-614
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular effects
Dose-response function
Health impact analysis
Mercury
Methylmercury
Myocardial Infarction
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has estimated the neurological benefits of reductions in prenatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in past assessments of rules controlling mercury (Hg) emissions. A growing body of evidence suggests that MeHg exposure can also lead to increased risks of adverse cardiovascular impacts in exposed populations. DATA EXTRACTION: The U.S. EPA assembled the authors of this article to participate in a workshop, where we reviewed the current science concerning cardiovascular health effects of MeHg exposure via fish and seafood consumption and provided recommendations concerning whether cardiovascular health effects should be included in future Hg regulatory impact analyses. DATA SYNTHESIS: We found the body of evidence exploring the link between MeHg and acute myocardial infarction (MI) to be sufficiently strong to support its inclusion in future benefits analyses, based both on direct epidemiological evidence of an MeHg?MI link and on MeHg?s association with intermediary impacts that contribute to MI risk. Although additional research in this area would be beneficial to further clarify key characteristics of this relationship and the biological mechanisms that underlie it, we consider the current epidemiological literature sufficiently robust to support the development of a dose?response function. CONCLUSIONS: We recommend the development of a dose?response function relating MeHg exposures with MIs for use in regulatory benefits analyses of future rules targeting Hg air emissions.
Online Resources
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Gestational age and birth weight in relation to n-3 fatty acids among Inuit (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4451
Source
Lipids. 2004 Jul;39(7):617-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Lucas M
Dewailly E
Muckle G
Ayotte P
Bruneau S
Gingras S
Rhainds M
Holub BJ
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research Unit, Laval University Medical Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Lipids. 2004 Jul;39(7):617-26
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Birth weight
Diet
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - chemistry - metabolism
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seafood
Statistics
Abstract
Seafood consumption during pregnancy carries both benefits (high n-3 FA intake) and risks (exposure to environmental contaminants) for the developing fetus. We determined the impacts of marine n-3 FA and environmental contaminants on gestational age (GA) of Nunavik women and the anthropometric characteristics of their newborns. FA and contaminant (polychlorinated biphenyls and mercury) concentrations were measured in cord plasma of Nunavik newborns (n = 454) and compared with those of a group of newborns (n = 29) from southern Québec. Data were collected from hospital records and birth certificates. In Nunavik newborns, arachidonic acid (AA) was two times lower (P
PubMed ID
15588018 View in PubMed
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High levels of PCBs in breast milk of Inuit women from Arctic Quebec

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature661
Source
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. 43:641-646
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
Dewailly, E
Nantel, A
Weber, JP
Author Affiliation
Community Health Department (Ste. Foy, Quebec)
Source
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. 43:641-646
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast-feeding
Diet
PCB
Organochlorines
Povungnituk
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
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21 records – page 1 of 3.