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Information behaviour of Canadian pharmaceutical policy makers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126983
Source
Health Info Libr J. 2012 Mar;29(1):16-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Devon L Greyson
Colleen Cunningham
Steve Morgan
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. devon@chspr.ubc.ca
Source
Health Info Libr J. 2012 Mar;29(1):16-27
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Consumer Health Information
Decision Making, Organizational
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Pharmacists - statistics & numerical data
Planning Techniques
Policy Making
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
Understanding the information behaviour of policy makers targeted by knowledge translation efforts is key to improving policy research impact. This study explores the reported information behaviour of pharmaceutical policy decision-makers in Canada, a country highly associated with evidence-based practice yet still facing substantial barriers to evidence-informed health policy.
We conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with a purposive sample of 15 Canadian pharmaceutical policy decision-makers. Results of the descriptive, qualitative analysis were compared with the General Model of Information Seeking of Professionals (GMISP) proposed by Leckie, Pettigrew and Sylvain in 1996.
Characteristics of information needs included topic, depth/breadth of questions and time sensitivity. Approaches to information seeking were variously scattershot, systematic and delegated, depending on the characteristics as well as respondent resources. Major source types were human experts, electronic sources and trusted organisations. Affective (emotion-related) outcomes were common, including frustration and desire for better information systems and sources.
The GMISP model may be adapted to model information behaviour of Canadian pharmaceutical policy makers. In the absence of a dedicated, independent source for rapid-response policy research, these policy makers will likely continue to satisfice (make do) with available resources, and barriers to evidence-informed policy will persist.
PubMed ID
22335286 View in PubMed
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Prescription drug use during pregnancy in developed countries: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101434
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Jul 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2011
Author
Jamie R Daw
Gillian E Hanley
Devon L Greyson
Steven G Morgan
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. jdaw@chspr.ubc.ca.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Jul 20;
Date
Jul-20-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: To review the literature describing patterns of outpatient prescription drug use during pregnancy by therapeutic category, potential for fetal harm, and overall. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature published from 1989 to 2010. We included studies evaluating individual-level exposures to prescription medicines during pregnancy. We selected only studies conducted in developed (Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development) countries and published in English. RESULTS: Published drug utilization studies reveal wide variation in estimates of overall prescription drug use in pregnancy (27-93% of pregnant women filling at least one prescription excluding vitamins and minerals). Among studies of similar design, estimates were lowest in Northern European countries (44-47%) and highest in France (93%) and Germany (85%). Measured rates of use of contraindicated medicines in pregnancy ranged from 0.9% (Denmark, 1991-1996) to 4.6% (USA, 1996-2000). The use of medicines with positive evidence of risk ranged from 2.0% (Italy, 2004) to 59.3% (France, 1996). CONCLUSION: Avoidable inconsistencies in study design and reporting attenuate conclusions that can be drawn from the literature on antenatal drug utilization. Nevertheless, the body of published research shows that antenatal prescription drug use is common, with many studies finding that a majority of women use one or more prescription medicine during pregnancy. Similarly, studies consistently report the use of drugs recognized as having potential risks in pregnancy. Given this widespread use, it is particularly important to develop standards for calculating and reporting antenatal exposures to improve the value of future research in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
21774029 View in PubMed
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