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Alzheimer's disease knowledge among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303880
Source
Alzheimers Dement (N Y). 2020; 6(1):e12101
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2020
Author
Meghan Jernigan
Amanda D Boyd
Carolyn Noonan
Dedra Buchwald
Author Affiliation
Partnerships for Native Health Seattle Washington USA.
Source
Alzheimers Dement (N Y). 2020; 6(1):e12101
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The population of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) aged 65 and older is growing rapidly, raising concerns about Alzheimer's disease (AD) in their communities.
We distributed a survey incorporating the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale to 341 AI/AN community members attending cultural events. We computed average adjusted predictions and 95% confidence intervals from a linear regression model, used joint F tests to examine differences in scores according to demographic variables, calculated the percentage of correct items for each participant, and computed domain-specific averages across the sample.
The average score was 19.0 (maximum 30); the average percentage of correct responses was 63%. Higher scores were associated with education but not with age, sex, or rural versus urban residence. Low scores were observed for items on caregiving and disease risk.
Participants were moderately well informed about AD, but specific knowledge domains call for community outreach and education.
PubMed ID
33344749 View in PubMed
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Assessing Needs for Cancer Education and Support in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities in the Northwestern United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287086
Source
Health Promot Pract. 2016 Nov;17(6):891-898
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Raymond Harris
Emily R Van Dyke
Thanh G N Ton
Carrie A Nass
Dedra Buchwald
Source
Health Promot Pract. 2016 Nov;17(6):891-898
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska Natives - psychology
Communication
Community health workers
Culture
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Status Disparities
Home Care Services - manpower
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Neoplasms - ethnology
Northwestern United States - epidemiology
Patient Navigation - manpower
Self-Help Groups
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) experience significant cancer disparities. To inform future public health efforts, a web-based needs assessment survey collected quantitative and qualitative data from AI/AN community health workers and cancer survivors in the northwestern United States. Content analysis of qualitative responses identified themes to contextualize quantitative results. Seventy-six AI/AN respondents (93% female) described substantial unmet needs for education and resources to assist cancer survivors, including a shortage of patient navigators, support groups, and home health care workers. Fear of negative outcomes, a culturally rooted avoidance of discussing illness, and transportation difficulties were cited as major barriers to participation in cancer education and receipt of health services. Face-to-face contact was overwhelmingly preferred for community education and support, but many respondents were receptive to other communication channels, including e-mail, social media, and webinars. Survey results highlight the importance of culturally sensitive approaches to overcome barriers to cancer screening and education in AI/AN communities. Qualitative analysis revealed a widespread perception among respondents that available financial and human resources were insufficient to support AI/AN cancer patients' needs.
PubMed ID
26507742 View in PubMed
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Assessing the Predictive Validity of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in Alaska Native and American Indian People.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305908
Source
J Addict Med. 2020 Sep/Oct; 14(5):e241-e246
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Author
Kate M Lillie
Kelley J Jansen
Lisa G Dirks
Abram J Lyons
Karl C Alcover
Jaedon P Avey
Katherine Hirchak
Jalene Herron
Dedra Buchwald
Dennis M Donovan
Michael G McDonell
Jennifer L Shaw
Author Affiliation
Southcentral Foundation, 4085 Tudor Centre Drive, Anchorage, AK (KML, KJJ, JPA, JLS); Information School, University of Washington, Box 352840, Mary Gates Hall, Seattle, WA (LGD); Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, Washington State University, 412 E. Riverpoint BLVD, Spokane, WA (AJL, KCA, MGMD); Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions, University of New Mexico, 2650 Yale Blvd SE, Albuquerque, NM (KH); Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (JH); Institute for Research and Education to Advance Community Health and Partnerships for Native Health, Washington State University, 1100 Olive Way, Ste 1200, Seattle, WA (DB); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, University of Washington, 1107 NE 45th Street, Suite 120, Seattle, WA (DMD).
Source
J Addict Med. 2020 Sep/Oct; 14(5):e241-e246
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the predictive validity of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) among Alaska Native and American Indian (ANAI) people with an alcohol use disorder.
The sample was 170 ANAI adults with an alcohol use disorder living in Anchorage, Alaska who were part of a larger alcohol intervention study. The primary outcome of this study was alcohol use as measured by mean urinary ethyl glucuronide (EtG). EtG urine tests were collected at baseline and then up to twice a week for four weeks. We conducted bivariate linear regression analyses to evaluate associations between mean EtG value and each of the three SOCRATES subscales (Recognition, Ambivalence, and Taking Steps) and other covariates such as demographic characteristics, alcohol use history, and chemical dependency service utilization. We then performed multivariable linear regression modeling to examine these associations after adjusting for covariates.
After adjusting for covariates, mean EtG values were negatively associated with the Taking Steps (P?=?0.017) and Recognition (P?=?0.005) subscales of the SOCRATES among ANAI people living in Alaska. We did not find an association between mean EtG values and the Ambivalence subscale (P?=?0.129) of the SOCRATES after adjusting for covariates.
Higher scores on the Taking Steps and Recognition subscales of the SOCRATES at baseline among ANAI people predicted lower mean EtG values. This study has important implications for communities and clinicians who need tools to assist ANAI clients in initiating behavior changes related to alcohol use.
PubMed ID
32371661 View in PubMed
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Barriers and bridges to implementing a workplace wellness project in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305344
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2020 07; 20(3):5946
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
07-2020
Author
Craig N Sawchuk
Joan Russo
Gary Ferguson
Jennifer Williamson
Janice Sabin
Jack Goldberg
Odile Madesclaire
Olivia Bogucki
Dedra Buchwald
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA sawchuk.craig@mayo.edu.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2020 07; 20(3):5946
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Abstract
The vast, rugged geography and dispersed population of Alaska pose challenges for managing chronic disease risk. Creative, population-based approaches are essential to address the region's health needs. The American Cancer Society developed Workplace Solutions, a series of evidence-based interventions, to improve health promotion and reduce chronic disease risk in workplace settings.
To adapt Workplace Solutions for implementation in eligible Alaskan businesses, research teams with the University of Washington and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium collaborated to address various geographic, intervention, and workplace barriers. Terrain, weather, and hunting seasons were frequent geographic challenges faced over the entire course of the pilot study. Coordinating several research review boards at the university, workplace, and regional tribal health organizations; study staff turnover during the entire course of the study; and difficulties obtaining cost-effective intervention options were common intervention barriers. Few workplaces meeting initial study eligibility criteria, turnover of business contacts, and a downturn in the state economy were all significant workplace barriers.
Flexibility, organization, responsiveness, communication, and collaboration between research staff and businesses were routinely required to problem-solve these geographic, intervention, and workplace barriers.
PubMed ID
32660254 View in PubMed
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Barriers to Cancer Care among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291213
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2016; 27(1):84-96
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Craig N Sawchuk
Emily Van Dyke
Adam Omidpanah
Joan E Russo
Ursula Tsosie
Jack Goldberg
Dedra Buchwald
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2016; 27(1):84-96
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska Natives
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Quality of Life
United States
Abstract
Cancer is among the leading causes of death in American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), with rates increasing over the last two decades. Barriers in accessing cancer screening and treatment likely contribute to this situation.
We administered structured clinical interviews and conducted descriptive and multiple linear regression analyses of demographic, health, spiritual, and treatment factors associated with self-reported barriers to cancer care among 143 adult AI/AN oncology patients.
High levels of satisfaction with cancer care, older age, positive mental health quality of life, and positive physical health quality of life were all significantly associated with lower scores for cancer care barriers, explaining 27% of the total model variance.
Addressing barriers to cancer care might help to reduce health disparities among AI/AN oncology patients. Future research should determine whether reducing barriers improves engagement with cancer treatment and overall health outcomes.
PubMed ID
27763460 View in PubMed
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Barriers to cancer clinical trial participation among American Indian and Alaska Native tribal college students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117524
Source
J Rural Health. 2013;29(1):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Debra Sprague
Joan Russo
Donna L LaVallie
Dedra Buchwald
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical and Epidemiological Research and Partnerships for Native Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. dedra@u.washington.edu
Source
J Rural Health. 2013;29(1):55-60
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Clinical Trials as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - ethnology
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Students
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) have some of the highest cancer-related mortality rates of all US racial and ethnic groups, but they are underrepresented in clinical trials. We sought to identify factors that influence willingness to participate in cancer clinical trials among AI/AN tribal college students, and to compare attitudes toward clinical trial participation among these students with attitudes among older AI/AN adults.
Questionnaire data from 489 AI/AN tribal college students were collected and analyzed along with previously collected data from 112 older AI/AN adults. We examined 10 factors that influenced participation in the tribal college sample, and using chi-square analysis and these 10 factors, we compared attitudes toward research participation among 3 groups defined by age: students younger than 40, students 40 and older, and nonstudent adults 40 and older.
About 80% of students were willing to participate if the study would lead to new treatments or help others with cancer in their community, the study doctor had experience treating AI/AN patients, and they received payment. Older nonstudent adults were less likely to participate on the basis of the doctor's expertise than were students (73% vs 84%, P = .007), or if the study was conducted 50 miles away (24% vs 41%, P= .001).
Finding high rates of willingness to participate is an important first step in increasing participation of AIs/ANs in clinical trials. More information is needed on whether these attitudes influence actual behavior when opportunities to participate become available.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23289655 View in PubMed
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Beyond Health Equity: Achieving Wellness Within American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262021
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 Apr 23;:e1-e4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-23-2015
Author
Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan
Michael Peercy
Dannielle Branam
Bobby Saunkeah
David Wharton
Marilyn Winkleby
John Lowe
Alicia L Salvatore
Daniel Dickerson
Annie Belcourt
Elizabeth D'Amico
Christi A Patten
Myra Parker
Bonnie Duran
Raymond Harris
Dedra Buchwald
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 Apr 23;:e1-e4
Date
Apr-23-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Indigenous peoples across the globe have higher morbidity and mortality rates than their non-Indigenous counterparts.(1) The nine-year gap in life expectancy between New Zealand's Indigenous Maori population and other New Zealanders has led to sweeping primary care reforms to improve health and reduce disparities.(2,3) The seven-year gap between Canada's First Nations, Metis, and Inuit populations and other Canadians led to the dedication of one of the 13 Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Institute of Aboriginal Peoples' Health, solely to improving the health of Canada's Indigenous peoples.(4) (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print April 23, 2015: e1-e4. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302447).
PubMed ID
25905823 View in PubMed
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Bringing Light to the Darkness: COVID-19 and Survivance of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306490
Source
Health Equity. 2021; 5(1):59-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2021
Author
Spero M Manson
Dedra Buchwald
Author Affiliation
Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
Source
Health Equity. 2021; 5(1):59-63
Date
2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) sweeping across our country has reawakened the fear, pain, stigma, and loss of past outbreaks of infectious diseases among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Attention to the pandemic has emphasized the challenges it poses for Native peoples: their vulnerability, the heartbreaking battle to constrain contagion, the lack of resources to care for those afflicted by the virus, and the mounting consequences for individuals, families, and community. We highlight the factors that contribute to them but conclude by underscoring the intrinsic strengths and resilience, which, in combination with modern public health tools, promise to resolve them.
PubMed ID
33681690 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular Disease in American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: Unique Risk Factors and Areas of Scholarly Need.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286646
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2017 Oct 24;6(10)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2017

43 records – page 1 of 5.