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Another look at heavy episodic drinking and alcohol use disorders among college and noncollege youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6664
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jul;65(4):477-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Deborah A Dawson
Bridget F Grant
Frederick S Stinson
Patricia S Chou
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-9304, USA. ddawson@willco.niaaa.nih.gov
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jul;65(4):477-88
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol-Induced Disorders - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Students - statistics & numerical data
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate rates of heavy episodic drinking, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence among U.S. adults 18-29 years of age and determine the relationship of these rates to student status and residence. METHOD: The analysis is based on data from a subsample of U.S. adults 18-29 years of age (N = 8666; 4849 female) who were interviewed as part of the 2001-02 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (N = 43,093). Data were collected in personal interviews from a representative sample of adults 18 and older, living in households and selected group quarters in the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii and the District of Columbia. RESULTS: Of all adults 18-29 years of age, 73.1% reported any drinking in the past year, 39.6% reported any heavy episodic drinking, 21.1% reported heavy drinking more than once a month and 11.0% reported heavy drinking more than once a week. Among past-year drinkers, these correspond to rates of 54.3% for any heavy episodic drinking, 28.9% for heavy drinking more than once a month and 15.0% for heavy drinking more than once a week. Although rates of heavy episodic drinking were slightly higher for college students than for noncollege students (p
PubMed ID
15378804 View in PubMed
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Co-occurrence of 12-month alcohol and drug use disorders and personality disorders in the United States: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9497
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Apr;61(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Bridget F Grant
Frederick S Stinson
Deborah A Dawson
S Patricia Chou
W June Ruan
Roger P Pickering
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, USA. bgrant@willco.niaaa.nih.gov
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Apr;61(4):361-8
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comorbidity
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Odds Ratio
Personality Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Very little information is available on the co-occurrence of different personality disorders (PDs) and alcohol and drug use disorders in the US population. OBJECTIVE: To present national data on sex differences in the co-occurrence of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) alcohol and drug use disorders and 7 of the 10 DSM-IV PDs. DESIGN: Face-to-face interviews conducted in the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (N = 43 093). SETTING: The United States and the District of Columbia, including Alaska and Hawaii. PARTICIPANTS: Household and group-quarters residents, aged 18 years and older. RESULTS: Among individuals with a current alcohol use disorder, 28.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 26.7-30.6) had at least 1 PD, whereas 47.7% (95% CI, 43.9-51.6) of those with a current drug use disorder had at least 1 PD. Further, 16.4% (95% CI, 15.1-17.6) of individuals with at least 1 PD had a current alcohol use disorder and 6.5% (95% CI, 5.7-7.3) had a current drug use disorder. Associations between PDs and alcohol and drug use disorders were overwhelmingly positive and significant (P
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2004 Nov;7(4):12415504812
PubMed ID
15066894 View in PubMed
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Immigration and lifetime prevalence of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites in the United States: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5997
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Dec;61(12):1226-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Bridget F Grant
Frederick S Stinson
Deborah S Hasin
Deborah A Dawson
S Patricia Chou
Karyn Anderson
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, USA. bgrant@willco.niaaa.nih.gov
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Dec;61(12):1226-33
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Comparative Study
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Mexican Americans - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There exist no national prevalence data on specific DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric disorders among foreign-born and US-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. OBJECTIVE: To present nationally representative data on the prevalence of DSM-IV lifetime psychiatric disorders among foreign-born and US-born Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. DESIGN: Face-to-face survey conducted in the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. SETTING: The United States and District of Columbia, including Alaska and Hawaii. PARTICIPANTS: Household and group-quarters residents, aged 18 years and older (n = 43 093). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of DSM-IV substance use disorders and mood and anxiety disorders. RESULTS: With few exceptions, foreign-born Mexican Americans and foreign-born non-Hispanic whites were at significantly lower risk (P
PubMed ID
15583114 View in PubMed
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