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Health system factors impacting on delivery of mental health services in Russia: multi-methods study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170743
Source
Health Policy. 2006 Dec;79(2-3):144-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
David McDaid
Yvevgeniy Aleksievich Samyshkin
Rachel Jenkins
Angelina Potasheva
Alexey Nikiforov
Rifat Ali Atun
Author Affiliation
LSE Health and Social Care, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE, United Kingdom. d.mcdaid@lse.ac.uk
Source
Health Policy. 2006 Dec;79(2-3):144-52
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Mental Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Research Design
Russia
Abstract
To evaluate how the regulatory environment and health system organisation, financing and provider payment systems influence the delivery of mental health services in the Sverdlovsk region of the Russian Federation.
A multi-methods study was conducted including analysis of routine data and key informant interviews supplemented by analysis of published literature, legal and regulatory documents, ministerial orders and reports.
Mental health care services are still largely provided in hospitals, although the need for more community-based and rehabilitation services is widely recognised. Resource allocation and provider payment systems remain largely unchanged from Soviet times and favour large inpatient institutions, creating incentives for hospitals to maintain a large number of beds and staff. Community-based social services and human resources remain limited, especially in the areas of social work, housing support and vocational rehabilitation, but co-operation across sectors at local level is growing.
In Russia, the pace of reform in the mental health system will be helped if financial resource allocation mechanisms and provider payment systems are also reformed, so that resources follow individuals regardless of where they are treated. Such major health system shifts can only be achieved through changes at the Federal level and require major political will. Additional transitional funding is also required to help develop the necessary alternative community-based services. The nature of mental health disorders mean that this is not a problem faced within the health system alone, greater attention needs to be placed also on how to maximise the cross sector benefits especially with the social protection and employment sectors.
PubMed ID
16472887 View in PubMed
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Mental health care reforms in Europe: Rehabilitation and social inclusion of people with mental illness in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145145
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2010 Mar;61(3):222-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Rachel Jenkins
David McDaid
Alexey Nikiforov
Angelina Potasheva
Jonathan Watkins
Stuart Lancashire
Yevgeniy Samyshkin
Peter Huxley
Rifat Atun
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, P.O. 35, David Goldberg Building, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom. rachel.jenkins@kcl.ac.uk
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2010 Mar;61(3):222-4
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Employment
Health Care Reform
Health Policy
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Motivation
Referral and Consultation
Russia
Social Adjustment
Abstract
Long-established Medico-Social Expert Commissions (MSECs) play a pivotal role in the Russian mental health system. They act as gatekeepers to pensions, rehabilitation, and employment services. This column describes their role in encouraging or impeding the social inclusion of people with mental illness, drawing on findings of a three-year project in Sverdlovsk Oblast. In Russia the emphasis remains on medical aspects of treatment, without adequate consideration of social and occupational rehabilitation. Links with local employment services are weak. To promote social inclusion, steps must be taken to encourage and facilitate cooperation and collaboration between the MSECs, employment services, and medical services.
PubMed ID
20194396 View in PubMed
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Mental health reform in the Russian Federation: an integrated approach to achieve social inclusion and recovery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160154
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2007 Nov;85(11):858-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Rachel Jenkins
Stuart Lancashire
David McDaid
Yevgeniy Samyshkin
Samantha Green
Jonathan Watkins
Angelina Potasheva
Alexey Nikiforov
Zinaida Bobylova
Valery Gafurov
David Goldberg
Peter Huxley
Jo Lucas
Nick Purchase
Rifat Atun
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London, England. r.jenkins@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2007 Nov;85(11):858-66
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Health Care Surveys
Health Personnel - education - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - utilization
National health programs - organization & administration
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
To facilitate mental health reform in one Russian oblast (region) using systematic approaches to policy design and implementation.
The authors undertook a three-year action-research programme across three pilot sites, comprising a multifaceted set of interventions combining situation appraisal to inform planning, sustained policy dialogue at federal and regional levels to catalyse change, introduction of multidisciplinary and intersectoral-working at all levels, skills-based training for professionals, and support for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to develop new care models.
Training programmes developed in this process have been adopted into routine curricula with measurable changes in staff skills. Approaches to care improved through multidisciplinary and multisectoral service delivery, with an increase in NGO activities, user involvement in care planning and delivery in all pilot sites. Hospital admissions at start and end of the study fell in two pilot sites, while the rate of readmissions in all three pilot sites by 2006 was below that for the region as a whole. Lessons learned have informed the development of regional and federal mental health policies.
A multifaceted and comprehensive programme can be effective in overcoming organizational barriers to the introduction of evidence-based multisectoral interventions in one Russian region. This can help facilitate significant and sustainable changes in policy and reduce institutionalization.
Notes
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Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2005 Oct;83(10):730-816283049
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Dec 17;331(7530):1418-916356950
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2001 Dec;52(12):1598-60611726749
PubMed ID
18038076 View in PubMed
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National funding for mental health research in Finland, France, Spain and the United Kingdom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291605
Source
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2017 09; 27(9):892-899
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
09-2017
Author
Jean-Baptiste Hazo
Coralie Gandré
Marion Leboyer
Carla Obradors-Tarragó
Stefano Belli
David McDaid
A-La Park
Maria Victoria Maliandi
Kristian Wahlbeck
Til Wykes
Jim van Os
Josep Maria Haro
Karine Chevreul
Author Affiliation
ECEVE, UMRS 1123, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, INSERM, Paris, France; AP-HP, URC-Eco, DHU Pepsy, F-75004 Paris, France; Foundation FondaMental, French National Science Foundation, Créteil, France. Electronic address: jeanbaptiste.hazo@urc-eco.fr.
Source
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2017 09; 27(9):892-899
Date
09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - economics
Charities - economics
Finland
France
Humans
Mental Health - economics
Spain
United Kingdom
Abstract
As part of the Roamer project, we aimed at revealing the share of health research budgets dedicated to mental health, as well as on the amounts allocated to such research for four European countries. Finland, France, Spain and the United Kingdom national public and non-profit funding allocated to mental health research in 2011 were investigated using, when possible, bottom-up approaches. Specifics of the data collection varied from country to country. The total amount of public and private not for profit mental health research funding for Finland, France, Spain and the UK was €10·2, €84·8, €16·8, and €127·6 million, respectively. Charities accounted for a quarter of the funding in the UK and less than six per cent elsewhere. The share of health research dedicated to mental health ranged from 4·0% in the UK to 9·7% in Finland. When compared to the DALY attributable to mental disorders, Spain, France, Finland, and the UK invested respectively €12·5, €31·2, €39·5, and €48·7 per DALY. Among these European countries, there is an important gap between the level of mental health research funding and the economic and epidemiologic burden of mental disorders.
PubMed ID
28647453 View in PubMed
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