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An inventory of collaborative arrangements between Aboriginal peoples and the Canadian forest sector: linking policies to diversification in forms of engagement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115901
Source
J Environ Manage. 2013 Apr 15;119:47-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2013
Author
Jean-François Fortier
Stephen Wyatt
David C Natcher
Margaret A Peggy Smith
Martin Hébert
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Department of Sociology, 1030 Avenue des Sciences-Humaines, Local 3469, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada. jean-francois.fortier.1@ulaval.ca
Source
J Environ Manage. 2013 Apr 15;119:47-55
Date
Apr-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Support Techniques
Environmental Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Forestry - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Abstract
This paper examines collaborative arrangements between Aboriginal peoples and the forest sector across Canada. Using a broad definition of collaboration, we identified 1378 arrangements in 474 Aboriginal communities in all Canadian provinces and territories, except Nunavut. We categorize these collaborative arrangements into five broad types: treaties and other formal agreements; planning and management activities; influence on decision-making; forest tenures; and economic roles and partnerships. Consistent data was available for only the first three types, which showed that close to 60% of Aboriginal communities use each approach. However, this masks significant differences between provinces. For example, economic roles and partnerships are in place in all New Brunswick communities and 74% of communities in British Columbia, but only 12% of Manitoban communities. The proportion of communities that have been involved in participatory processes in forest decision-making (such as advisory committees and consultation processes) is particularly high in Quebec with 88% of communities, but only 32% of communities hold forest tenures. We also find that three-quarters of all communities choose to engage in two or more approaches, despite the demands that this can place upon the time and energy of community members. We finally consider how policy environments in different jurisdictions affect the frequency of certain types of collaboration. This empirical study, and the typology that it demonstrates, can inform policy development for Aboriginal involvement in Canadian forestry and help guide future research into broader issues of collaborative governance of natural resources.
PubMed ID
23454413 View in PubMed
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Undermining subsistence: Barren-ground caribou in a "tragedy of open access".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303035
Source
Sci Adv. 2018 02; 4(2):e1701611
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Brenda L Parlee
John Sandlos
David C Natcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G2H1, Canada.
Source
Sci Adv. 2018 02; 4(2):e1701611
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Canada
Ecosystem
Geography
Humans
Minerals
Mining
Population Dynamics
Population Groups
Porcupines - physiology
Reindeer - physiology
Abstract
Sustaining arctic/subarctic ecosystems and the livelihoods of northern Indigenous peoples is an immense challenge amid increasing resource development. The paper describes a "tragedy of open access" occurring in Canada's north as governments open up new areas of sensitive barren-ground caribou habitat to mineral resource development. Once numbering in the millions, barren-ground caribou populations (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus/Rangifer tarandus granti) have declined over 70% in northern Canada over the last two decades in a cycle well understood by northern Indigenous peoples and scientists. However, as some herds reach critically low population levels, the impacts of human disturbance have become a major focus of debate in the north and elsewhere. A growing body of science and traditional knowledge research points to the adverse impacts of resource development; however, management efforts have been almost exclusively focused on controlling the subsistence harvest of northern Indigenous peoples. These efforts to control Indigenous harvesting parallel management practices during previous periods of caribou population decline (for example, 1950s) during which time governments also lacked evidence and appeared motivated by other values and interests in northern lands and resources. As mineral resource development advances in northern Canada and elsewhere, addressing this "science-policy gap" problem is critical to the sustainability of both caribou and people.
PubMed ID
29503864 View in PubMed
Less detail

Undermining subsistence: Barren-ground caribou in a "tragedy of open access".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290197
Source
Sci Adv. 2018 Feb; 4(2):e1701611
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Brenda L Parlee
John Sandlos
David C Natcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G2H1, Canada.
Source
Sci Adv. 2018 Feb; 4(2):e1701611
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Sustaining arctic/subarctic ecosystems and the livelihoods of northern Indigenous peoples is an immense challenge amid increasing resource development. The paper describes a "tragedy of open access" occurring in Canada's north as governments open up new areas of sensitive barren-ground caribou habitat to mineral resource development. Once numbering in the millions, barren-ground caribou populations (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus/Rangifer tarandus granti) have declined over 70% in northern Canada over the last two decades in a cycle well understood by northern Indigenous peoples and scientists. However, as some herds reach critically low population levels, the impacts of human disturbance have become a major focus of debate in the north and elsewhere. A growing body of science and traditional knowledge research points to the adverse impacts of resource development; however, management efforts have been almost exclusively focused on controlling the subsistence harvest of northern Indigenous peoples. These efforts to control Indigenous harvesting parallel management practices during previous periods of caribou population decline (for example, 1950s) during which time governments also lacked evidence and appeared motivated by other values and interests in northern lands and resources. As mineral resource development advances in northern Canada and elsewhere, addressing this "science-policy gap" problem is critical to the sustainability of both caribou and people.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29503864 View in PubMed
Less detail