Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska sentinel surveillance study of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Alaska Native persons from 2000 to 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132465
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Oct;49(10):3638-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Adrienne H Tveit
Michael G Bruce
Dana L Bruden
Julie Morris
Alisa Reasonover
Debby A Hurlburt
Thomas W Hennessy
Brian McMahon
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Oct;49(10):3638-43
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Biopsy
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Gastric Mucosa - microbiology
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Prevalence
Sentinel Surveillance
Young Adult
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori infection is more common in Alaska Native persons than in the general U.S. population, with seroprevalence to H. pylori approaching 75%. Previous studies in Alaska have demonstrated elevated proportions of antimicrobial resistance among H. pylori isolates. We analyzed H. pylori data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's sentinel surveillance in Alaska from January 2000 to December 2008 to determine the proportion of culture-positive biopsy specimens with antimicrobial resistance from Alaska Native persons undergoing endoscopy. The aim of the present study was to monitor antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori isolates over time and by region in Alaska Native persons. Susceptibility testing of H. pylori isolates to metronidazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and tetracycline was performed using agar dilution. Susceptibility testing for levofloxacin was performed by Etest. Overall, 45% (532/1,181) of persons undergoing upper endoscopy were culture positive for H. pylori. Metronidazole resistance was demonstrated in isolates from 222/531 (42%) persons, clarithromycin resistance in 159/531 (30%) persons, amoxicillin resistance in 10/531 (2%) persons, and levofloxacin resistance in 30/155 (19%) persons; no tetracycline resistance was documented. The prevalence of metronidazole, clarithromycin, and levofloxacin resistance varied by region. Female patients were more likely than male patients to demonstrate metronidazole (P
Notes
Cites: Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2000 Nov;7(6):885-811063492
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Nov 14;17(42):4682-822180710
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Jan 1;136(1):13-2411777360
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Sep 16;139(6):463-913679322
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3942-414638505
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 Jun;10(6):1088-9415207062
Cites: Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 1990 Mar;19(1):183-962184128
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Jun 24;345(8965):1591-47783535
Cites: Gut. 1996 May;38(5):675-88707111
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1997 Nov;25(5):973-89402340
Cites: West Indian Med J. 2004 Dec;53(6):374-715816263
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2005 Nov;56(5):965-716159928
Cites: J Med Microbiol. 2006 Jan;55(Pt 1):65-816388032
Cites: Gut. 2004 Sep;53(9):1374-8415306603
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Apr 15;23(8):1215-2316611283
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2006 Jul;19(3):449-9016847081
Cites: Helicobacter. 2006 Dec;11(6):581-817083381
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Jan 15;44(2):e5-817173210
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Apr;66(2):144-5217515254
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Jun 15;25(12):1429-3417539982
Cites: Helicobacter. 2008 Oct;13 Suppl 1:1-618783514
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):337-4619917186
Cites: Future Microbiol. 2010 Apr;5(4):639-4820353303
Cites: Gut. 2010 May;59(5):572-820427390
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2000 Dec;46(6):1029-3111102427
PubMed ID
21813726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibody levels and protection after hepatitis B vaccination: results of a 15-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5632
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2005 Mar 1;142(5):333-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2005
Author
Brian J McMahon
Dana L Bruden
Kenneth M Petersen
Lisa R Bulkow
Alan J Parkinson
Omana Nainan
Marina Khristova
Carolyn Zanis
Helen Peters
Harold S Margolis
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. bdm9@cdc.gov
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2005 Mar 1;142(5):333-41
Date
Mar-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Viral - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Hepatitis B virus - genetics - immunology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Vaccination
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The duration of protection afforded by hepatitis B vaccination is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine antibody persistence and protection from hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: 15 villages in southwest Alaska. PARTICIPANTS: 1578 Alaska Natives vaccinated at age 6 months or older. INTERVENTION: During 1981-1982, participants received 3 doses of plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine. This cohort was followed annually over the first 11 years, and 841 (53%) persons were tested at 15 years. MEASUREMENTS: Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), markers of HBV infection, and testing to identify HBV variants. RESULTS: Levels of anti-HBs in the cohort decreased from a geometric mean concentration of 822 mIU/mL after vaccination to 27 mIU/mL at 15 years. Initial anti-HBs level, older age at vaccination, and male sex were associated with persistence of higher anti-HBs levels at 15 years when analyzed by a longitudinal linear mixed model. After adjustment for initial anti-HBs level and sex, those vaccinated at age 6 months to 4 years had the lowest anti-HBs level at 15 years. Asymptomatic breakthrough infections were detected in 16 participants and occurred more frequently in persons who did not respond to vaccination than those who responded (P = 0.01). Among infected persons with viremia, 2 were infected with wild-type HBV and 4 had HBV surface glycoprotein variants, generally accompanied by wild-type HBV. LIMITATIONS: The loss of participants to follow-up at 15 years was 47%. However, characteristics of persons tested were similar to those of persons lost to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatitis B vaccination strongly protected against infection for at least 15 years in all age groups. Antibody levels decreased the most among persons immunized at 4 years of age or younger.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Mar 1;142(5):384-515738458
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Mar 1;142(5):I3415738447
PubMed ID
15738452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnostic accuracy of tests for Helicobacter pylori in an Alaska Native population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128673
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Nov 14;17(42):4682-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-14-2011
Author
Dana L Bruden
Michael G Bruce
Karen M Miernyk
Julie Morris
Debby Hurlburt
Thomas W Hennessy
Helen Peters
Frank Sacco
Alan J Parkinson
Brian J McMahon
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging Zoonoses and Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK 99508, United States. dbruden@cdc.gov
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Nov 14;17(42):4682-8
Date
Nov-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Breath Tests - methods
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - standards
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Female
Helicobacter Infections - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Stomach Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology
Urea - metabolism
Urease - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the accuracy of two non-invasive tests in a population of Alaska Native persons. High rates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, H. pylori treatment failure, and gastric cancer in this population necessitate documentation of infection status at multiple time points over a patient's life.
In 280 patients undergoing endoscopy, H. pylori was diagnosed by culture, histology, rapid urease test, (13)C urea breath test (UBT), and immunoglobulin G antibodies to H. pylori in serum. The performances of (13)C-UBT and antibody test were compared to a gold standard defined by a positive H. pylori test by culture or, in case of a negative culture result, by positive histology and a positive rapid urease test.
The sensitivity and specificity of the (13)C-UBT were 93% and 88%, respectively, relative to the gold standard. The antibody test had an equivalent sensitivity of 93% with a reduced specificity of 68%. The false positive results for the antibody test were associated with previous treatment for an H. pylori infection [relative risk (RR) = 2.8]. High levels of antibodies to H. pylori were associated with chronic gastritis and male gender, while high scores in the (13)C-UBT test were associated with older age and with the H. pylori bacteria load on histological examination (RR = 4.4).
The (13)C-UBT outperformed the antibody test for H. pylori and could be used when a non-invasive test is clinically necessary to document treatment outcome or when monitoring for reinfection.
Notes
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2009 Mar 1;199(5):652-6019125674
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Dec;20(12):775-817171196
Cites: Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2000 Nov;7(6):885-811063492
Cites: Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2002 Sep;9(5):1044-812204957
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Sep 16;139(6):463-913679322
Cites: J Clin Pathol. 1994 Mar;47(3):227-318163693
Cites: J Gastroenterol. 1995 Jun;30(3):295-3007647894
Cites: J Clin Gastroenterol. 1995;21 Suppl 1:S164-88775012
Cites: Am J Surg Pathol. 1996 Oct;20(10):1161-818827022
Cites: Endoscopy. 1997 Jan;29(1):27-309083733
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1998 Feb;58(1):19-279516653
Cites: Hepatogastroenterology. 1999 May-Jun;46(27):2057-6210430397
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Nov 15;20(10):1001-1715569102
Cites: Helicobacter. 2005 Dec;10(6):615-916302988
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2006 Feb 15;193(4):537-4616425133
Cites: Gut. 2006 Apr;55(4):457-6216162678
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Apr 15;23(8):1215-2316611283
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2006 Jul;19(3):449-9016847081
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Jan 15;44(2):e5-817173210
Cites: Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2007 Jan;14(1):85-617079433
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2007 Feb 14;13(6):925-917352025
Cites: Helicobacter. 2006 Dec;11(6):581-817083381
Cites: Alaska Med. 2006 Jul-Sep;48(2):30-5917140152
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2009 May 15;48(10):1385-9119368506
PubMed ID
22180710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimating the date of hepatitis C virus infection from patient interviews and antibody tests on stored sera.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5639
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Aug;99(8):1517-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Dana L Bruden
Brian J McMahon
Thomas W Hennessy
Carol J Christensen
Chriss E Homan
James L Williams
Daniel G Sullivan
David R Gretch
Henry H Cagle
Lisa R Bulkow
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Aug;99(8):1517-22
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Hepatitis C Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis C, Chronic - diagnosis - immunology - transmission
Humans
Interviews
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - virology
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Studies on the natural history and outcome of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection differ regarding the proportion of persons who develop serious sequelae over time. Most of these studies use an estimated date of HCV infection based on risk factor data obtained from patient interviews. The date of HCV infection is often estimated using the year of a pre-1992 blood transfusion (BT), or the first year of injecting drug use (IDU). We sought to determine the accuracy of these dates obtained by interview. METHODS: We compared BT dates reported by patients in a long-term HCV outcome study to dates confirmed in a BT-Lookback project, and also compared the reported first year of IDU to seroconversion dates estimated from HCV tests on historical sera. RESULTS: Of 28 BT recipients who were interviewed in the HCV outcome study and identified in the Lookback project, 14 (50%; 95% CI: 31-69%) were unaware they had received a BT. Of 25 persons identified in the BT-Lookback project with historical sera available, 9 (36%; 95% CI: 19-57%) had anti-HCV results that did not correlate with their confirmed BT date. Of 216 persons with a history of IDU and historical serum samples available, 66 (31%; 95% CI: 25-37%) had anti-HCV results that did not correlate with their reported first year of IDU. CONCLUSIONS: Inaccuracies in the length of HCV could occur in outcome studies that rely on patient recall of risk-factor history. Statistical methods that incorporate the uncertainty in assigning infection date are needed.
PubMed ID
15307870 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a volunteer sample in nasopharyngeal colonization surveys for Streptococcus pneumoniae in rural Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5985
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):16-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Dana L Bruden
Thomas W Hennessy
Jay C Butler
Debra A Hurlburt
Debra J Parks
Lisa R Bulkow
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska, AK 99508-5932, USA. zkg9@cdc.gov
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):16-25
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child
Colony Count, Microbial
Comparative Study
Evaluation Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Pneumococcal Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Probability
Reference Values
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Streptococcus pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare characteristics of persons in rural northern communities who participated in a study on antimicrobial use and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) to those who did not participate. STUDY DESIGN: The original study (1998--2000) was a community-based, controlled intervention trial designed to determine the penicillin susceptibility of nasopharyngeal SP isolates in relation to community-wide use of antibiotics. The study continued after 2000, in a subset of the original communities, to prospectively evaluate the impact of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on the carriage of SP. The results presented here are an analysis of the first five years of data. METHODS: We conducted annual surveys (1998--2002) for nasopharyngeal colonization of SP using a volunteer sample of residents in rural communities. Medical chart reviews for health clinic visitation and antibiotic use were completed for all village residents. RESULTS: Participants were younger (22.8 vs. 28.4 years), had more health clinic utilization (3.3 vs. 2.4 visits) and received more antibiotics (1.0 vs. 0.6 courses) than non-participants. Differences between participants and non-participants were similar across all years of the study. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides further empirical evidence that selection bias should be considered when designing studies. However, a volunteer sample provided internal consistency for comparison of our main study outcomes across time.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):2-315776987
PubMed ID
15776989 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of a conjugate vaccine on community-wide carriage of nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5810
Source
J Infect Dis. 2004 Dec 1;190(11):2031-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2004
Author
Matthew R Moore
Terri B Hyde
Thomas W Hennessy
Debra J Parks
Alisa L Reasonover
Marcella Harker-Jones
James Gove
Dana L Bruden
Karen Rudolph
Alan Parkinson
Jay C Butler
Anne Schuchat
Author Affiliation
Division of Applied Public Health Training, Epidemiology Program Office, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. mmoore4@cdc.gov
Source
J Infect Dis. 2004 Dec 1;190(11):2031-8
Date
Dec-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Carrier State - drug therapy - microbiology - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - genetics
Female
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Male
Meningococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Penicillins - pharmacology
Pneumococcal Infections - drug therapy - microbiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Risk factors
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects - genetics
Time Factors
Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Combination - pharmacology
Urban Population
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate - administration & dosage
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease and pneumonia among children. Antimicrobial resistance among pneumococci has increased in recent years and complicates treatment. The introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) could reduce acquisition of antimicrobial-resistant pneumococci. METHODS: We obtained 1350 nasopharyngeal swabs for culture from 1275 children aged 3-59 months presenting at 3 clinics in Anchorage, Alaska, during the winters of 2000, 2001, and 2002, as PCV7 was being introduced into the routine immunization schedule. We recorded the frequency of use of antibiotics as well as the dates of doses of PCV7 for enrolled children. We used multivariate logistic regression modeling to identify independent risk factors for overall carriage of pneumococci and carriage of PCV7-type pneumococci, cotrimoxazole-nonsusceptible (COT-NS) pneumococci, or penicillin-nonsusceptible (PCN-NS) pneumococci. RESULTS: The proportion of children who were up-to-date for age, with respect to PCV7 vaccination, increased from 0% in 2000 to 55% in 2002. Carriage of PCV7-type pneumococci decreased by 43% (P
PubMed ID
15529269 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on invasive disease, antimicrobial resistance and colonization in Alaska Natives: progress towards elimination of a health disparity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29450
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Dec 1;23(48-49):5464-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2005
Author
Thomas W Hennessy
Rosalyn J Singleton
Lisa R Bulkow
Dana L Bruden
Debby A Hurlburt
Debra Parks
Matthew Moore
Alan J Parkinson
Anne Schuchat
Jay C Butler
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. thennessey@cdc.gov
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Dec 1;23(48-49):5464-73
Date
Dec-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infant
Meningococcal Vaccines - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Population Surveillance
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
We evaluated invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), antimicrobial resistance and nasopharyngeal colonization before and after introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in Alaska Natives (AN), a population with high IPD rates. We obtained IPD rates from population-based surveillance. Colonization was determined from annual surveys among rural AN of all ages and from urban children. After vaccine introduction, vaccine-type IPD rates declined by 91% among AN children
PubMed ID
16188350 View in PubMed
Less detail

PCV7-induced changes in pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease burden in Alaskan children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263812
Source
Vaccine. 2014 Nov 12;32(48):6478-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2014
Author
James W Keck
Jay D Wenger
Dana L Bruden
Karen M Rudolph
Debby A Hurlburt
Thomas W Hennessy
Michael G Bruce
Source
Vaccine. 2014 Nov 12;32(48):6478-84
Date
Nov-12-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Incidence
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Serogroup
Time Factors
Vaccines, Conjugate - administration & dosage
Abstract
Changes in pneumococcal serotype-specific carriage and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) could inform serotype epidemiology patterns following the introduction of newer conjugate vaccines.
We used data from statewide IPD surveillance and annual pneumococcal carriage studies in four regions of Alaska to calculate serotype-specific invasiveness ratios (IR; odds ratio of a carried serotype's likelihood to cause invasive disease compared to other serotypes) in children 1) caused 66% of IPD in both periods, although fewer serotypes with IR>1 remained in the post-vaccine (n=9) than the pre-vaccine period (n=13).
After PCV7 introduction, serotype IRs changed little, and four of the most invasive serotypes were nearly eliminated. If PCV13 use leads to a reduction of carriage and IPD for the 13 vaccine serotypes, the overall IPD rate should further decline.
The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
PubMed ID
25269095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Persistence of antibody to hepatitis B and protection from disease among Alaska natives immunized at birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5622
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Sep;24(9):786-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Catherine M Dentinger
Brian J McMahon
Jay C Butler
Charlotte E Dunaway
Carolyn L Zanis
Lisa R Bulkow
Dana L Bruden
Omana V Nainan
Marina L Khristova
Thomas W Hennessy
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Sep;24(9):786-92
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - ethnology - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alaska Native (AN) children were at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection before vaccination began in 1983. We evaluated the long-term protection from hepatitis B (HB) vaccination among AN children immunized when infants. METHODS: During 1984-1995, we recruited a convenience sample of AN children who had received a three dose series of HB vaccine starting at birth and had serum antibody to hepatitis B (anti-HBs) concentrations of >/= 10 mIU/mL at 7-26 months of age. We evaluated anti-HBs concentrations and the presence of anti-HBc in participants' sera every other year up to age 16 years. Anti-HB core antigen (anti-HBc)-positive specimens were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen and for HBV DNA. RESULTS: We followed 334 children for 3151 person-years (median, 10 years per child) with 1610 specimens collected. Anti-HBs concentrations dropped rapidly among all participants. Among children 2, 5 and 10 years of age, 37 of 79 (47%), 33 of 176 (19%) and 8 of 95 (8%), respectively, had anti-HBs concentrations of >/= 10 mIU/mL. Receipt of recombinant vaccine was significantly associated with a more rapid antibody decline (P
PubMed ID
16148845 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.