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ADHD as a risk factor for incident unprovoked seizures and epilepsy in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30239
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Jul;61(7):731-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Dale C Hesdorffer
Petur Ludvigsson
Elias Olafsson
Gunnar Gudmundsson
Olafur Kjartansson
W Allen Hauser
Author Affiliation
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, College of Physicians & Surgeons, and Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Jul;61(7):731-6
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Seizures - diagnosis - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) occurs more frequently than expected in prevalent cohorts with epilepsy. The association has been attributed to the epilepsy or its treatment, although it is impossible to determine in previous studies which condition occurs first. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a population-based case-control study of all newly diagnosed unprovoked seizures among Icelandic children younger than 16 years to address the question of time order. DESIGN: Children with seizures were matched to the next 2 same-sex births from the population registry. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children was used to make a DSM-IV diagnosis of ADHD in a standardized fashion among cases and controls aged 3 to 16 years. RESULTS: A history of ADHD was 2.5-fold more common among children with newly diagnosed seizures than among control subjects (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-5.5). The association was restricted to ADHD predominantly inattentive type (odds ratio [OR], 3.7; 95% CI, 1.1-12.8), not ADHD predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6-5.7) or ADHD combined type (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.3-18.3). Seizure type, etiology, sex, or seizure frequency at diagnosis (1 or >1) did not affect findings. CONCLUSION: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder occurs more often than expected before unprovoked seizures, suggesting a common antecedent for both conditions.
PubMed ID
15237085 View in PubMed
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Combined analysis of risk factors for SUDEP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100900
Source
Epilepsia. 2011 Jun;52(6):1150-1159
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Dale C Hesdorffer
Torbjorn Tomson
Emma Benn
Josemir W Sander
Lena Nilsson
Yvonne Langan
Thaddeus S Walczak
Ettore Beghi
Martin J Brodie
Allen Hauser
Author Affiliation
Columbia University, New York, New York, U.S.A. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom SEIN - Epilepsy Institute in the Netherlands Foundation, Heemstede, The Netherlands Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, Stora Sköndal Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A. Mario Negri Institute, Milan, Italy University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
Source
Epilepsia. 2011 Jun;52(6):1150-1159
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Purpose: To pool data from four published case-control studies of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) with live controls, to increase the power to determine risk factors. Methods: Case-control studies from the United States, Sweden, Scotland, and England were combined. SUDEP was defined as (1) a history of epilepsy (>1 epileptic seizure during a period of
PubMed ID
21671925 View in PubMed
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Depression and suicide attempt as risk factors for incident unprovoked seizures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9104
Source
Ann Neurol. 2006 Jan;59(1):35-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Dale C Hesdorffer
W Allen Hauser
Elias Olafsson
Petur Ludvigsson
Olafur Kjartansson
Author Affiliation
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA. dch5@columbia.edu
Source
Ann Neurol. 2006 Jan;59(1):35-41
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Depression - complications - physiopathology
Epilepsy - diagnosis - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Risk factors
Seizures - etiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted
Abstract
Major depression has been shown to increase the risk for development of epilepsy, but prior studies have not evaluated whether this is due to specific symptoms of depression. We conducted a population-based case-control study of all newly diagnosed unprovoked seizures among Icelandic children and adults aged 10 years and older to test the hypothesis that major depression is a risk factor for developing unprovoked seizure and epilepsy, and to address whether specific symptoms of depression account for this increased risk. Cases were matched to the next two same sex births from the population registry. Using standardized interviews, we ascertained symptoms of major depression to make a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) diagnosis. A history of major depression was 1.7-fold more common among cases than among controls (95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.7). A history of attempted suicide was 5.1-fold more common among cases than among controls (95% confidence interval, 2.2-11.5). Attempted suicide increased seizure risk even after adjusting for age, sex, cumulative alcohol intake, and major depression or number of symptoms of depression. Major depression and attempted suicide independently increase the risk for unprovoked seizure. These data suggest that depression and suicide attempt may be due to different underlying neurochemical pathways, each of which is important in the development of epilepsy.
PubMed ID
16217743 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of recurrent symptoms and their association with epilepsy and febrile seizure in school-aged children: a community-based survey in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126653
Source
Epilepsy Behav. 2012 Mar;23(3):315-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Elisa Baldin
Petur Ludvigsson
Olafur Mixa
Dale C Hesdorffer
Author Affiliation
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Epilepsy Behav. 2012 Mar;23(3):315-9
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Seizures, Febrile - epidemiology
Abstract
We determined the prevalence of common recurrent symptoms in a community-based study of children and investigated whether these symptoms were associated with epilepsy and febrile seizure. A questionnaire was developed and sent to parents of all children attending school in the Reykjavik school district, grades 1-10. The questions assessed personality traits, headache, epilepsy, febrile seizure, and recurrent symptoms. Of the 13,044 questionnaires distributed, 10,578 were returned (81%). We analyzed the subset of 9679 (91%) questionnaires with complete information on relevant factors. The prevalence of epilepsy was 7.7/1000; febrile seizures were reported in 5.1% of children. Prevalence estimates of recurrent symptoms were similar to the published literature. In our cohort, recurrent dizzy spells and recurrent visual disturbances were associated with epilepsy after adjustment for age, migraine and febrile seizure. This association could reflect, only in part, the occurrence of auras in children with epilepsy.
PubMed ID
22370120 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status is a risk factor for epilepsy in Icelandic adults but not in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9156
Source
Epilepsia. 2005 Aug;46(8):1297-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Dale C Hesdorffer
Hong Tian
Kishlay Anand
W Allen Hauser
Petur Ludvigsson
Elias Olafsson
Olafur Kjartansson
Author Affiliation
GH Sergievsky Center, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. dch5@columbia.edu
Source
Epilepsia. 2005 Aug;46(8):1297-303
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Social Class
Abstract
PURPOSE: Two earlier population-based studies provide conflicting information on the association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and risk for epilepsy. Seizure etiologies (e.g., head injury, stroke) associated with low SES were not addressed in prior analyses. We assess the relation between SES indices and incident epilepsy separately for children and adults and in subgroups defined by seizure etiology. METHODS: In this population-based case-control study, a surveillance system identified incident unprovoked seizure or first diagnosis of epilepsy throughout Iceland (n = 418). Controls were selected from the population registry as the next two same-sex births alive, residing in Iceland at the time of the index seizure, and without a history of unprovoked seizure on the date of the case's incident seizure (n = 835). The odds ratio measured the association between SES and epilepsy. RESULTS: An association was found between epilepsy and SES among adults, but not among children. Among adults, low education was associated with an increased risk for epilepsy [odds ratio (OR), 2.29; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-4.34), and home ownership was protective (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.92). When analyses were repeated by seizure etiology, this association remained only in the group with epilepsy of unknown cause, even after adjusting for alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Low SES, indexed by low education or lack of home ownership, is a risk factor for epilepsy in adults, but not in children, suggesting a cumulative effect of SES on risk for epilepsy. This association is not explained by established risk factors for epilepsy (e.g., head injury, stroke). We find no evidence of a downward social drift among cases whose parents had epilepsy.
PubMed ID
16060943 View in PubMed
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