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Prevalence and burden of osteoarthritis: results from a population survey in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85909
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Apr;35(4):677-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Grotle Margreth
Hagen Kaare Birger
Natvig Baard
Dahl Fredrik A
Kvien Tore Kristian
Author Affiliation
National Resource Centre for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. margreth.grotle@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Apr;35(4):677-84
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disability Evaluation
Female
Hand Joints - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in knee, hip, and hand in a general population in Norway and the burden of disease in terms of associations between the report of OA and health-related variables. METHODS: In 2004, postal questionnaires were sent to all people in a local community born in 1928-30, 1938-40, 1948-50, 1958-60, 1968-70, and 1978-80. A total of 3266 (56.7%) responded. The prevalence of hip, knee, and/or hand OA was obtained by the item "Have you ever been diagnosed with osteoarthritis in hip/knee/hand by a medical doctor or by x-ray?". RESULTS: The overall prevalence of OA was 12.8% (95% CI 11.7-14.0), being significantly higher among women [14.7% (95% CI 13.1-16.4)] than men [10.5% (95% CI 9.0-12.1)]. The prevalence for hip OA was 5.5% (95% CI 4.7-6.3), knee OA 7.1% (95% CI 6.3-8.0), and for hand OA 4.3% (95% CI 3.6-5.0). OA was significantly (all p 1 year, pain in several body sites, sick leave for more than 8 weeks, emotional distress, poor sleeping quality, fatigue, and with frequent use of healthcare providers in primary health care. A significant (p = 0.001) dose-response relationship between increasing body mass index and OA was found. CONCLUSION: The overall prevalence of OA was 12.8% and higher prevalence was found among women and older people, people with less than 12 years of education, those out of work, and those overweight. OA was associated with pain, disability, and poor health status, and frequent use of healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
18278832 View in PubMed
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A randomised comparison of a four- and a five-point scale version of the Norwegian Function Assessment Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87238
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Østerås Nina
Gulbrandsen Pål
Garratt Andrew
Benth Juratë Saltytë
Dahl Fredrik A
Natvig Bård
Brage Søren
Author Affiliation
Section of Occupational Health and Social Insurance Medicine, Institute of General Practice and Community Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. nina.osteras@medisin.uio.no
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:14
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sick Leave
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is variation in the number of response alternatives used within health-related questionnaires. This study compared a four-and a five-point scale version of the Norwegian Function Assessment Scale (NFAS) by evaluating data quality, internal consistency and validity. METHODS: All inhabitants in seven birth cohorts in the Ullensaker municipality of Norway were approached by means of a postal questionnaire. The NFAS was included as part of The Ullensaker Study 2004. The instrument comprises 39 items derived from the activities/participation component in the International Classification for Functioning, Disabilities and Health (ICF). The sample was computer-randomised to either the four-point or the five-point scale version. RESULTS: Both versions of the NFAS had acceptable response rates and good data quality and internal consistency. The five-point scale version had better data quality in terms of missing data, end effects at the item and scale level, as well as higher levels of internal consistency. Construct validity was acceptable for both versions, demonstrated by correlations with instruments assessing similar aspects of health and comparisons with groups of individuals known to differ in their functioning according to existing evidence. CONCLUSION: Data quality, internal consistency and discriminative validity suggest that the five-point scale version should be used in future applications.
PubMed ID
18279500 View in PubMed
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Unstable dynamics and population limitation in mountain hares.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84098
Source
Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2007 Nov;82(4):527-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Newey Scott
Dahl Fredrik
Willebrand Tomas
Thirgood Simon
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83 Umeå, Sweden; The Game Conservancy Trust, Drumochter Lodge, Dalwhinnie, Inverness-shire PH19 1AF, UK; and The Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, UK.
Source
Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2007 Nov;82(4):527-49
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The regular large-scale population fluctuations that characterize many species of northern vertebrates have fascinated ecologists since the time of Charles Elton. There is still, however, no clear consensus on what drives these fluctuations. Throughout their circumpolar distribution, mountain hares Lepus timidus show regular and at times dramatic changes in density. There are distinct differences in the nature, amplitude and periodicity of these fluctuations between regions and the reasons for these population fluctuations and the geographic differences remain largely unknown. In this review we synthesize knowledge on the factors that limit or regulate mountain hare populations across their range in an attempt to identify the drivers of unstable dynamics. Current knowledge of mountain hare population dynamics indicates that trophic interactions - either predator-prey or host-parasite - appear to be the major factor limiting populations and these interactions may contribute to the observed unstable dynamics. There is correlative and experimental evidence that some mountain hare populations in Fennoscandia are limited by predation and that predation may link hare and grouse cycles to microtine cycles. Predation is unlikely to be important in mountain hare populations in Scotland as most hares occur on sporting estates where predators are controlled, but this hypothesis remains to be experimentally tested. There is, however, emerging experimental evidence that some Scottish mountain hare populations are limited by parasites and that host-parasite interactions contribute to unstable dynamics. By contrast, there is little evidence from Fennoscandia that parasitism is of any importance to mountain hare population dynamics, although disease may cause periodic declines. Although severe weather and food limitation may interact to cause periodic high winter mortality there is little evidence that food availability limits mountain hare populations. There is a paucity of information concerning the factors limiting or regulating mountain hare populations in the Alps of Central Europe or in the tundra and taiga belts of Russia. Future research on mountain hare population dynamics should focus on the interactions between predation, parasitism and nutrition with stochastic factors such as climate and anthropogenic management including harvesting.
PubMed ID
17944616 View in PubMed
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