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Spatio-temporal trends and monitoring design of perfluoroalkyl acids in the eggs of gull (Larid) species from across Canada and parts of the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291077
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Sep 15; 565:440-450
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-15-2016
Author
Sarah B Gewurtz
Pamela A Martin
Robert J Letcher
Neil M Burgess
Louise Champoux
John E Elliott
D V Chip Weseloh
Author Affiliation
310 Normandy Avenue, Waterloo, ON N2K 1X7, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Sep 15; 565:440-450
Date
Sep-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alkanesulfonic Acids - analysis - metabolism
Animals
Canada
Carboxylic Acids - analysis - metabolism
Charadriiformes - metabolism
Eggs - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Fluorocarbons - analysis - metabolism
Ovum - chemistry
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Sulfonic Acids - analysis - metabolism
United States
Abstract
A large spatial dataset of perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) concentrations in eggs of herring gulls (Larus argentatus or congeneric species) collected from late April to early June between 2009 and 2014 from 28 colonies across Canada and parts of the Unites States was used to evaluate location-specific patterns in chemical concentrations and to generate hypotheses on the major sources affecting PFAA distributions. The highly bioaccumulative perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) as well as other perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) showed the greatest concentrations in eggs from the lower Great Lakes of southern Ontario as well as from the St. Lawrence River. Despite the 2000 to 2002 phase-out of PFOS and related C8 chemistry by the major manufacturer at the time, ongoing losses from consumer products during use and disposal in urban/industrial locations continue to be major sources to the environment and are influencing the spatial trends of PFOS in Canada. In comparison to PFOS, perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) were not as concentrated in eggs in close proximity to urbanized/industrialized centers, but had surprisingly elevated levels in relatively remote regions such as Great Slave Lake, NT and East Bay in Hudson Bay, NU. The present results support the hypothesis that atmospheric transport and degradation of precursor chemicals, such as the fluorotelomer alcohols 8:2 FTOH and 10:2 FTOH, are influencing the spatial trends of PFCAs in Canada. A power analysis conducted on a representative urbanized/industrialized colony in the Toronto Harbour, ON, and a relatively remote colony in Lake Superior, emphasized the importance of consistent and long-term data collection in order to detect the anticipated changes in PFAA concentrations in Canadian gull eggs.
PubMed ID
27183458 View in PubMed
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Spatio-temporal trends and monitoring design of perfluoroalkyl acids in the eggs of gull (Larid) species from across Canada and parts of the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272841
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 May 13;565:440-450
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-2016
Author
Sarah B Gewurtz
Pamela A Martin
Robert J Letcher
Neil M Burgess
Louise Champoux
John E Elliott
D V Chip Weseloh
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 May 13;565:440-450
Date
May-13-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A large spatial dataset of perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) concentrations in eggs of herring gulls (Larus argentatus or congeneric species) collected from late April to early June between 2009 and 2014 from 28 colonies across Canada and parts of the Unites States was used to evaluate location-specific patterns in chemical concentrations and to generate hypotheses on the major sources affecting PFAA distributions. The highly bioaccumulative perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) as well as other perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) showed the greatest concentrations in eggs from the lower Great Lakes of southern Ontario as well as from the St. Lawrence River. Despite the 2000 to 2002 phase-out of PFOS and related C8 chemistry by the major manufacturer at the time, ongoing losses from consumer products during use and disposal in urban/industrial locations continue to be major sources to the environment and are influencing the spatial trends of PFOS in Canada. In comparison to PFOS, perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) were not as concentrated in eggs in close proximity to urbanized/industrialized centers, but had surprisingly elevated levels in relatively remote regions such as Great Slave Lake, NT and East Bay in Hudson Bay, NU. The present results support the hypothesis that atmospheric transport and degradation of precursor chemicals, such as the fluorotelomer alcohols 8:2 FTOH and 10:2 FTOH, are influencing the spatial trends of PFCAs in Canada. A power analysis conducted on a representative urbanized/industrialized colony in the Toronto Harbour, ON, and a relatively remote colony in Lake Superior, emphasized the importance of consistent and long-term data collection in order to detect the anticipated changes in PFAA concentrations in Canadian gull eggs.
PubMed ID
27183458 View in PubMed
Less detail

Winter home range and habitat selection differs among breeding populations of herring gulls in eastern North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298867
Source
Mov Ecol. 2019; 7:8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Christine M Anderson
H Grant Gilchrist
Robert A Ronconi
Katherine R Shlepr
Daniel E Clark
D V Chip Weseloh
Gregory J Roberston
Mark L Mallory
Author Affiliation
1Department of Biology, Acadia University, 33 Westwood Ave, Wolfville, NS B4P 2R6 Canada.
Source
Mov Ecol. 2019; 7:8
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Recognizing the factors influencing migratory individuals throughout their annual cycle is important for understanding the drivers of population dynamics. Previous studies have found that Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) in the Atlantic region have lower survival rates than those in the Great Lakes and the Arctic. One possible explanation for divergent survival rates among these populations is differences in their non-breeding habitats.
We tracked Herring Gulls from five populations, breeding in the eastern Arctic, the Great Lakes, Newfoundland, Sable Island, and the Bay of Fundy. We assessed the extent of migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering sites, and tested if there were differences in home range size or habitat selection among these populations during the winter.
The tracked Herring Gulls had strong migratory connectivity between their breeding and wintering areas. We found that Herring Gulls from the Arctic spent most of the winter in marine habitats, while the other populations used a wider variety of habitats. However, the Newfoundland and Sable Island populations selected for urban habitats, and almost all individuals the specialized in urban habitats came from one of the three Atlantic populations.
Our results suggest that there could potentially be a link between urban habitat use during the winter and reduced adult survival in Atlantic Canada Herring Gulls.
Notes
ErratumIn: Mov Ecol. 2019 Apr 12;7:13 PMID 31044077
PubMed ID
30891245 View in PubMed
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