Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Accidental fatal monochloroacetic acid poisoning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4081
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1995 Jun;16(2):115-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
D R Rogers
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Alaska Regional Hospital, Anchorage 99508, USA.
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1995 Jun;16(2):115-6
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home
Acetic Acids - blood - poisoning
Child, Preschool
Death, Sudden - etiology
Female
Humans
Mass Fragmentography
Warts - drug therapy
Abstract
A case of accidental lethal monochloroacetic acid poisoning is presented, along with a brief review of the mechanisms of intoxication. Although lethal skin exposures have been previously reported, this case appears to be the first instance of oral-route poisoning to be documented.
PubMed ID
7572862 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atherosclerosis in Alaska Natives and non-natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5191
Source
Lancet. 1993 Apr 24;341(8852):1056-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-1993
Author
W P Newman
J P Middaugh
M T Propst
D R Rogers
Author Affiliation
Louisiana State University Medical School, New Orleans 70112.
Source
Lancet. 1993 Apr 24;341(8852):1056-7
Date
Apr-24-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Aorta, Abdominal - pathology
Aortic Diseases - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Low mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) among Eskimos has been attributed to less atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries because of a high dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids. Other investigators attribute this low mortality to the fact that Eskimos have a high mortality from other causes before middle age, when CHD is common. However, most studies have been epidemiological, either by death-certificate review or risk-factor evaluation. We evaluated the extent of atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries and aortas from Alaska Natives. Standardised comparisons between samples from 103 Native and 101 non-native residents show that the extent of raised lesions increases with age in both groups, but the prevalence of raised lesions in native specimens was consistently lower than in those from non-natives. This difference was statistically significant. The data suggest that the differences in CHD mortality between Alaska Natives and non-natives are, at least in part, the result of less atherosclerosis in natives.
PubMed ID
8096960 View in PubMed
Less detail

Autoamputation of the left arm--a bizarre suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3688
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1988 Mar;9(1):64-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
D R Rogers
Author Affiliation
Humana Hospital-Alaska, Anchorage.
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1988 Mar;9(1):64-5
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amputation, Traumatic
Arm Injuries
Female
Humans
Self Mutilation
Suicide
Abstract
A 24-year-old woman committed suicide by amputating her left arm immediately below the shoulder joint with a small kitchen knife. No references to such a suicide were found in an extensive literature search.
PubMed ID
3354529 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of atherosclerosis in alaska Natives and nonnatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5173
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 1997 Oct;121(10):1069-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
W P Newman
J P Middaugh
M A Guzman
M T Propst
D R Rogers
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans 70112, USA.
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 1997 Oct;121(10):1069-75
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Aorta, Abdominal - pathology
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - ethnology - mortality - pathology
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Tunica Intima - pathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that Alaska Natives have fewer atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries and aorta than nonnative Alaska residents. DESIGN: Systematic standardized collection and evaluation of coronary arteries and aortas collected at autopsy. SETTING: Forensic autopsy service in Alaska. SUBJECTS: One hundred thirty Alaska Natives and 115 Alaska nonnatives who underwent forensic autopsy between February 1989 and December 1993. INTERVENTION: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence and extent of atherosclerotic lesions in the aortas and coronary arteries in both populations studied. RESULTS: Alaska Natives had significantly lower prevalence and extent of raised atherosclerotic lesions in the abdominal aorta and coronary arteries than nonnative Alaska residents. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in coronary heart disease mortality between Alaska Natives and nonnatives are, at least in part, the result of fewer atherosclerotic lesions in Alaska Natives.
PubMed ID
9341586 View in PubMed
Less detail

Simultaneous temporal and frontal suicidal gunshots.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3685
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1989 Dec;10(4):338-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
D R Rogers
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Humana Hospital, Anchorage, Alaska.
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1989 Dec;10(4):338-9
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Craniocerebral Trauma
Humans
Male
Suicide
Wounds, Gunshot
Abstract
A white man in a remote area of Alaska shot himself simultaneously with two revolvers--a .41 magnum and a .44 magnum. Only three examples of two-gun suicides are described in the literature.
PubMed ID
2589298 View in PubMed
Less detail