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Alcohol withdrawal at home. Pilot project for frail elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212064
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 May;42:937-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
D J Evans
S D Street
D J Lynch
Author Affiliation
Victoria Innovative Seniors Treatment Agency (VISTA), BC.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 May;42:937-45
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Alcoholism - prevention & control
British Columbia
Case Management - organization & administration
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Social Support
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control
Abstract
The need for safe, accessible, client-centred, alcohol withdrawal services for seniors was recognized by health service workers in Victoria. A partnership of health and support service organizations developed and implemented a pilot project for treating alcohol withdrawal in the home. The project provided service that integrated well with a substance-abuse treatment program for seniors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8688696 View in PubMed
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Cyclosporin A in the prevention and treatment of experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis in the brown Norway rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57766
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 1991 Jul;85(1):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1991
Author
J. Reynolds
S J Cashman
D J Evans
C D Pusey
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London, England.
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 1991 Jul;85(1):28-32
Date
Jul-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Animals
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
Basement Membrane - immunology
Cyclosporins - therapeutic use
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Glomerular Mesangium - immunology
Glomerulonephritis - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
Goodpasture Syndrome - immunology - pathology
Radioimmunoassay
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis (EAG) was induced in brown Norway (BN) rats by a single i.m. injection of collagenase-solubilized homologous glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in Freund's complete adjuvant. This model of anti-GBM disease is characterized by the development, over several weeks, of circulating and deposited anti-GBM antibodies, accompanied by albuminuria. We examined the effects of treatment with oral cyclosporin A (CsA) at different doses, starting at the time of immunization and during the course of the disease. Pretreatment with CsA 5 mg kg daily produced a moderate reduction in circulating anti-GBM antibody levels, reduced deposition of antibody on the GBM and decreased albuminuria. Doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg CsA produced a marked reduction in circulating antibody, absence of detectable deposited antibody and virtual absence of albuminuria. Renal function remained normal in CsA-treated and control animals. When CsA treatment was introduced at 2 or 4 weeks after immunization, there were significant effects on the subsequent autoimmune response and albuminuria at 10 and 20 mg/kg daily. These studies demonstrate that CsA in conventional doses has a therapeutic effect in this model of anti-GBM disease, and suggest a role for T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of EAG.
PubMed ID
2070559 View in PubMed
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Goal attainment scaling in a geriatric day hospital. Team and program benefits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202340
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Apr;45:954-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
D J Evans
S. Oakey
S. Almdahl
B. Davoren
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Apr;45:954-60
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia
Day Care - standards
Geriatrics
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - standards
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - standards
Abstract
The Geriatric Day Program (GDP) of the Capital Health Region in Victoria, BC, is concerned with effective team processes, accountability for health service outcomes, and improving the quality of programs. The GDP identified a need to improve its interdisciplinary processes and generate useful patient outcome data.
To determine whether Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) could be introduced to facilitate interdisciplinary processes and to generate useful health outcome data.
The GAS procedures were incorporated into clinical routines based on published guidelines. The authors determined GAS outcome scores for patients who completed the program and developed outcome scores for specific geriatric problem areas requiring intervention. Outcome scores were made available to the clinical care team and to program managers for continuous quality improvement purposes.
The GAS process was successfully implemented and was acceptable to clinicians and managers at the GDP. Team processes were thought to be improved by focusing on patient goals in a structured way. The GAS provided data on both patient outcomes and outcomes of interventions in specific problem areas. Accountability for patient care increased. Goal Attainment Scaling provided indicators of care for which clinicians could develop program quality improvements.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10216794 View in PubMed
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