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Occupational exposures and risk of rheumatoid arthritis: continued advances and opportunities for research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93062
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Jun;35(6):950-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Cooper Glinda S
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Jun;35(6):950-2
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: J Rheumatol. 2008 Jun;35(6):1145-5018412300
PubMed ID
18528947 View in PubMed
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Recent insights in the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases: improved prevalence estimates and understanding of clustering of diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95039
Source
J Autoimmun. 2009 Nov-Dec;33(3-4):197-207
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cooper Glinda S
Bynum Milele L K
Somers Emily C
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Washington, DC 20052, USA. cooper.glinda@epa.gov
Source
J Autoimmun. 2009 Nov-Dec;33(3-4):197-207
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Previous studies have estimated a prevalence of a broad grouping of autoimmune diseases of 3.2%, based on literature review of studies published between 1965 and 1995, and 5.3%, based on national hospitalization registry data in Denmark. We examine more recent studies pertaining to the prevalence of 29 autoimmune diseases, and use these data to correct for the underascertainment of some diseases in the hospitalization registry data. This analysis results in an estimated prevalence of 7.6-9.4%, depending on the size of the correction factor used. The rates for most diseases for which data are available from many geographic regions span overlapping ranges. We also review studies of the co-occurrence of diseases within individuals and within families, focusing on specific pairs of diseases to better distinguish patterns that may result in insights pertaining to shared etiological pathways. Overall, data support a tendency for autoimmune diseases to co-occur at greater than expected rates within proband patients and their families, but this does not appear to be a uniform phenomenon across all diseases. Multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis is one disease pair that appears to have a decreased chance of coexistence.
PubMed ID
19819109 View in PubMed
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Unraveling the etiology of systemic autoimmune diseases: peering into the preclinical phase of disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95100
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Sep;36(9):1853-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009