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Alcohol-attributable deaths and years of potential life lost among American Indians and Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87788
Source
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Naimi, T.S., Cobb, N., Boyd, D., Jarman, D.W., Brewer, R., Nelson, D.E., Holt, J., Epsey, D., Snesud, P, Chavez, P.
Source
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
life span, alcoholism, American Indian, Alaska Native, public health
Abstract
Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading preventable cause of death in the United States and has substantial public health impact on American Indian and Alaska Native populations.
Notes
2001-2005 Evaluation
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Source
Pages 27-30 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
  1 document  
Author
Cobb, N.
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Indian Health Service, Albuquerque, NM
Source
Pages 27-30 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Bias (epidemiology)
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Guidelines
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Male
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
A cluster is a mini-epidemic of a rare disease. Clusters may give clues to the etiology of disease, or may signal a hazardous exposure. Unfortunately, cluster investigations seldom are conclusive, for several reasons. Statistically significant clusters can occur by chance. The probability of finding chance cancer clusters is calculated for the 200 Alaska Native villages. The problem of selection bias is explained, and other limitations of epidemiology are described. A logical, stepwise protocol for investigating cancer clusters is presented.
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