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[Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart. Danish Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53169
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Mar 21;167(12-13):1386
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2005
Author
Claus Leth Petersen
Andreas Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Klinisk-fysiologisk Nuklearmedicinsk Afdeling, H:S Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57-59, 2000 Frederiksberg. claus.leth.petersen@fh.hosp.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Mar 21;167(12-13):1386
Date
Mar-21-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Heart - anatomy & histology - physiology - radiography - radionuclide imaging
Heart Diseases - diagnosis
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
15832706 View in PubMed
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Myocardial perfusion imaging in Denmark: activity from 1997 to 2001 and current practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49766
Source
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2003 Jan;30(1):137-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Claus Leth Petersen
Andreas Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Frederiksberg Hospital H:S, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. CLPetersen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2003 Jan;30(1):137-40
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Health Care Surveys
Heart - radionuclide imaging
Heart Diseases - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital - trends - utilization
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Radionuclide Imaging - methods - trends - utilization
Abstract
A questionnaire was sent to all departments of nuclear medicine in Denmark (n=20) asking for details of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), including the number of patients examined each year from 1997 to 2001 and the current clinical and technical practice. All (100%) departments replied, and the survey thus covers all MPI performed in Denmark during the period in question. The number of MPI studies (examined patients) was 2,531 in 1997 (0.47 MPI/1,000/year) and 4,961 (0.93 MPI/1,000/year) in 2001, which is a doubling in activity in 5 years. Nineteen (95%) of the Danish departments performed MPI in 2001, and 14 (74%) of these reported that activity had increased over the past 5 years. MPI activity was unevenly distributed between hospitals and regions. In 2001, the university hospitals in the central Copenhagen region (capital) accounted for the highest MPI activity (2.00/1,000/year), while the non-university hospitals in general had the lowest activity rate (0.73/1,000/year). The most pronounced increment found in the period was observed in the university hospitals outside Copenhagen, where activity increased by 300% from 0.44/1,000/year in 1997 to 1.33/1,000/year in 2001. All departments providing MPI used tomographic acquisition technique and all departments used technetium tracers. The more sophisticated techniques of MPI - gated acquisition, attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction - were used in 74%, 32% and 42% of departments, respectively. The stress mode in perfusion studies was dipyridamole/adenosine in 76%, exercise in 18% and dobutamine in 6%. Despite these encouraging figures, MPI activity for 2001 remained well below what is recommended by other national and international societies. The anticipated further increase in nuclear cardiology is encouraging, but the nuclear medicine community needs to address the issues that prevent it from keeping up with demand. In general, the restricted camera time and the limited number of trained personnel explain the excessive waiting lists in Denmark.
PubMed ID
12583361 View in PubMed
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[Myocardial scintigraphy in Denmark 1997-2001. Activity and status]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53525
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 May 19;165(21):2202-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-2003

Right and left ventricular cardiac function in a developed world population with human immunodeficiency virus studied with radionuclide ventriculography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7243
Source
Am Heart J. 2004 Mar;147(3):482-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Anne-Mette Lebech
Jan Gerstoft
Birger Hesse
Claus Leth Petersen
Andreas Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. lebech@dadlnet.dk
Source
Am Heart J. 2004 Mar;147(3):482-8
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Denmark
Developed Countries
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
HIV Infections - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Radionuclide Ventriculography
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stroke Volume
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - radionuclide imaging
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - radionuclide imaging
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cardiac dysfunction has been reported in a substantial part of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, most studies are from a time before the introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), which has significantly reduced HIV-associated morbidity and mortality rates. Accordingly, the prevalence of HIV-associated cardiac dysfunction may also have changed. The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of right- and left-sided cardiac dysfunction in a Danish HIV population, most of whom were undergoing HAART, with radionuclide ventriculography. METHODS: Ninety-five consecutive patients with HIV infection were included. Mean HIV duration was 104 months, and 84% of the patients received HAART. All patients underwent radionuclide ventriculography, and plasma levels of atrial natriuetic peptide (ANP), brain natriuetic peptide (BNP), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were measured. Thirty age- and sex-matched healthy volunteer subjects were included to establish reference values of radionuclide measurements of left and right ventricular ejection fraction and of left ventricular volume. RESULTS: Of 95 patients with HIV, 1 (1%) had a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and 6 (7%) had a reduced right ventricle ejection fraction (0.35-0.42) compared with reference values from the age- and sex-matched reference population. Patients with HIV and reduced cardiac function did not differ in the duration of HIV, CD4 count, CD4 nadir, or HIV RNA load. No correlations were found between reduced cardiac function and levels of the 3 peptides measured. CONCLUSIONS: No major dysfunction of the left ventricle is present in a developed world HIV population. However, a small but significant part of this population has modestly reduced right-sided systolic function.
Notes
Comment In: Am Heart J. 2004 Nov;148(5):e1815523296
PubMed ID
14999198 View in PubMed
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