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A dental intervention with an Alaskan Native population: lessons learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99213
Source
Int Dent J. 2010 Jun;60(3 Suppl 2):241-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Christine Riedy
Author Affiliation
University of Washington, Seattle 98195-7475, USA. cariedy@u.washington.edu
Source
Int Dent J. 2010 Jun;60(3 Suppl 2):241-4
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This paper briefly describes a dental intervention within the Alaska Native population to reduce early childhood dental disease, the challenges faced in conducting the research, and the lessons learned. The American Indian/Alaska Native populations share a disproportionate burden of childhood dental disease compared to their majority counterparts. Despite the gains in oral health for the general population not all groups have equally benefited. Even recently, severe dental disease was found within > 60% of young Alaska Native children. There have been few intervention studies to reduce dental disease in Alaska Natives or their children. One study aimed at reducing dental disease in very young children via an intervention directed at the pregnant woman. Several challenges, anticipated and unanticipated, were faced in the development and conduct of the intervention. These challenges and the resulting lessons learned are presented here.
PubMed ID
20718310 View in PubMed
Less detail

Using Storytelling to Address Oral Health Knowledge in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292050
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2018 May 24; 15:E63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-24-2018
Author
Brenda Heaton
Christina Gebel
Andrew Crawford
Judith C Barker
Michelle Henshaw
Raul I Garcia
Christine Riedy
Maureen A Wimsatt
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 560 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02118. Email: brenda9@bu.edu.
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2018 May 24; 15:E63
Date
May-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
We conducted a qualitative analysis to evaluate the acceptability of using storytelling as a way to communicate oral health messages regarding early childhood caries (ECC) prevention in the American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) population.
A traditional story was developed and pilot tested among AIAN mothers residing in 3 tribal locations in northern California. Evaluations of the story content and acceptability followed a multistep process consisting of initial feedback from 4 key informants, a focus group of 7 AIAN mothers, and feedback from the Community Advisory Board. Upon story approval, 9 additional focus group sessions (N = 53 participants) were held with AIAN mothers following an oral telling of the story.
Participants reported that the story was culturally appropriate and used relatable characters. Messages about oral health were considered to be valuable. Concerns arose about the oral-only delivery of the story, story content, length, story messages that conflicted with normative community values, and the intent to target audiences. Feedback by focus group participants raised some doubts about the relevance and frequency of storytelling in AIAN communities today.
AIAN communities value the need for oral health messaging for community members. However, the acceptability of storytelling as a method for the messaging raises concerns, because the influence of modern technology and digital communications may weaken the acceptability of the oral tradition. Careful attention must be made to the delivery mode, content, and targeting with continual iterative feedback from community members to make these messages engaging, appropriate, relatable, and inclusive.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29806581 View in PubMed
Less detail

Using Storytelling to Address Oral Health Knowledge in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297493
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2018 05 24; 15:E63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
05-24-2018
Author
Brenda Heaton
Christina Gebel
Andrew Crawford
Judith C Barker
Michelle Henshaw
Raul I Garcia
Christine Riedy
Maureen A Wimsatt
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 560 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02118. Email: brenda9@bu.edu.
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2018 05 24; 15:E63
Date
05-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Alaska Natives
California
Child
Communication
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American
Oral Health - standards
Pilot Projects
Abstract
We conducted a qualitative analysis to evaluate the acceptability of using storytelling as a way to communicate oral health messages regarding early childhood caries (ECC) prevention in the American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) population.
A traditional story was developed and pilot tested among AIAN mothers residing in 3 tribal locations in northern California. Evaluations of the story content and acceptability followed a multistep process consisting of initial feedback from 4 key informants, a focus group of 7 AIAN mothers, and feedback from the Community Advisory Board. Upon story approval, 9 additional focus group sessions (N = 53 participants) were held with AIAN mothers following an oral telling of the story.
Participants reported that the story was culturally appropriate and used relatable characters. Messages about oral health were considered to be valuable. Concerns arose about the oral-only delivery of the story, story content, length, story messages that conflicted with normative community values, and the intent to target audiences. Feedback by focus group participants raised some doubts about the relevance and frequency of storytelling in AIAN communities today.
AIAN communities value the need for oral health messaging for community members. However, the acceptability of storytelling as a method for the messaging raises concerns, because the influence of modern technology and digital communications may weaken the acceptability of the oral tradition. Careful attention must be made to the delivery mode, content, and targeting with continual iterative feedback from community members to make these messages engaging, appropriate, relatable, and inclusive.
PubMed ID
29806581 View in PubMed
Less detail