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Association between individual-level and community-level socio-economic status and blood pressure among Inuit in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279899
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32757
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Mylène Riva
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Peter Bjerregaard
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32757
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background Despite abundant evidence that socio-economic status (SES) is a fundamental determinant of health, there is a dearth of research examining association between SES, measured at the individual and community levels, and cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity among indigenous populations. Objectives To examine the influence of individual-level and community-level SES on systolic and diastolic blood pressure among Greenlandic Inuit. Methods Multilevel analysis of cross-sectional data from the Inuit Health in Transition - Greenland Survey, to which 3,108 Greenlandic Inuit aged 18 years and older participated. Blood pressure is measured using an automatic device, according to standardized protocol. Individual SES is measured by education. Community socio-economic conditions are measured using combined information on average disposable household income and settlement type. Results Education was not significantly associated with blood pressure. There was an inverse U-shape association between community socio-economic conditions and blood pressure with significantly lower SBP and DBP among participants living in remote traditional villages characterized by lower average disposable household income and in affluent more urbanized towns. Sex-stratified analyses demonstrate the salience of community conditions for men. Conclusions The association observed between blood pressure and community-level socio-economic conditions suggests that public health and social policies, programmes and interventions aiming to improve living conditions might improve cardiovascular health in Greenland. Studies are required to further examine social gradients in cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity among indigenous populations using different measures of SES.
PubMed ID
28156396 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between individual-level and community-level socio-economic status and blood pressure among Inuit in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277981
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32757
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Mylène Riva
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Peter Bjerregaard
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32757
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Despite abundant evidence that socio-economic status (SES) is a fundamental determinant of health, there is a dearth of research examining association between SES, measured at the individual and community levels, and cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity among indigenous populations.
To examine the influence of individual-level and community-level SES on systolic and diastolic blood pressure among Greenlandic Inuit.
Multilevel analysis of cross-sectional data from the Inuit Health in Transition - Greenland Survey, to which 3,108 Greenlandic Inuit aged 18 years and older participated. Blood pressure is measured using an automatic device, according to standardized protocol. Individual SES is measured by education. Community socio-economic conditions are measured using combined information on average disposable household income and settlement type.
Education was not significantly associated with blood pressure. There was an inverse U-shape association between community socio-economic conditions and blood pressure with significantly lower SBP and DBP among participants living in remote traditional villages characterized by lower average disposable household income and in affluent more urbanized towns. Sex-stratified analyses demonstrate the salience of community conditions for men.
The association observed between blood pressure and community-level socio-economic conditions suggests that public health and social policies, programmes and interventions aiming to improve living conditions might improve cardiovascular health in Greenland. Studies are required to further examine social gradients in cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity among indigenous populations using different measures of SES.
PubMed ID
27938632 View in PubMed
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Association between individual-level and community-level socio-economic status and blood pressure among Inuit in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289278
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32757
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2016
Author
Mylène Riva
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
Institute for Health and Social Policy and Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; mylene.riva@mcgill.ca.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32757
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Blood pressure
Female
Greenland
Health status
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Despite abundant evidence that socio-economic status (SES) is a fundamental determinant of health, there is a dearth of research examining association between SES, measured at the individual and community levels, and cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity among indigenous populations.
To examine the influence of individual-level and community-level SES on systolic and diastolic blood pressure among Greenlandic Inuit.
Multilevel analysis of cross-sectional data from the Inuit Health in Transition - Greenland Survey, to which 3,108 Greenlandic Inuit aged 18 years and older participated. Blood pressure is measured using an automatic device, according to standardized protocol. Individual SES is measured by education. Community socio-economic conditions are measured using combined information on average disposable household income and settlement type.
Education was not significantly associated with blood pressure. There was an inverse U-shape association between community socio-economic conditions and blood pressure with significantly lower SBP and DBP among participants living in remote traditional villages characterized by lower average disposable household income and in affluent more urbanized towns. Sex-stratified analyses demonstrate the salience of community conditions for men.
The association observed between blood pressure and community-level socio-economic conditions suggests that public health and social policies, programmes and interventions aiming to improve living conditions might improve cardiovascular health in Greenland. Studies are required to further examine social gradients in cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity among indigenous populations using different measures of SES.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27938632 View in PubMed
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Associations between birth weight and glucose intolerance in adulthood among Greenlandic Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298851
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2019 Mar 06; 150:129-137
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-06-2019
Author
Pernille Falberg Rønn
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Lærke Steenberg Smith
Peter Bjerregaard
Inger Katrine Dahl-Petersen
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Niels Grarup
Gregers Stig Andersen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark. Electronic address: pernille.falberg.roenn@regionh.dk.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2019 Mar 06; 150:129-137
Date
Mar-06-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To examine the association between birth weight and glucose intolerance in adult Greenlandic Inuit.
We examined 1429 participants aged 18-56?years from two population-based, cross-sectional studies in Greenland with information on birth weight. Oral glucose tolerance tests, anthropometric measures and ultrasound of abdominal tissue were performed. Associations of birth weight with glucose markers were analysed using linear or logistic regressions. Spline analyses were conducted to examine u-shaped associations. Adjustments were done for age, sex, birth place, family history of diabetes, genetic admixture, TBC1D4 p.Arg684Ter carrier status, BMI and visceral adipose tissue.
The median birthweight was 3300?g and 3.9% had type 2 diabetes, T2DM. Spline analyses indicated overall linear associations. In fully adjusted analyses, an increase in birth weight of 1?kg was associated with a change in fasting plasma glucose of -0.06?mmol/L (95%CI: -0.11, -0.01), 2-h plasma glucose of -0.16?mmol/L (95%CI: -0.35, 0.02), HOMA-IR of -5.45% (95%CI: -10.34, -0.29), insulin sensitivity index of 7.04% (95%CI: 1.88, 12.45) and a trend towards a reduced risk of hyperglycaemia and T2DM, although statistically insignificant.
Birth weight was inversely associated with hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance independently of adult adiposity. Thus, the findings support low birth weight as a contributing factor for glucose intolerance in adult Inuit in Greenland.
PubMed ID
30851284 View in PubMed
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Associations between birth weight and glucose intolerance in adulthood among Greenlandic Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302016
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2019 Apr; 150:129-137
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Pernille Falberg Rønn
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Lærke Steenberg Smith
Peter Bjerregaard
Inger Katrine Dahl-Petersen
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Niels Grarup
Gregers Stig Andersen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark. Electronic address: pernille.falberg.roenn@regionh.dk.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2019 Apr; 150:129-137
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Glucose Intolerance - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - physiopathology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the association between birth weight and glucose intolerance in adult Greenlandic Inuit.
We examined 1429 participants aged 18-56?years from two population-based, cross-sectional studies in Greenland with information on birth weight. Oral glucose tolerance tests, anthropometric measures and ultrasound of abdominal tissue were performed. Associations of birth weight with glucose markers were analysed using linear or logistic regressions. Spline analyses were conducted to examine u-shaped associations. Adjustments were done for age, sex, birth place, family history of diabetes, genetic admixture, TBC1D4 p.Arg684Ter carrier status, BMI and visceral adipose tissue.
The median birthweight was 3300?g and 3.9% had type 2 diabetes, T2DM. Spline analyses indicated overall linear associations. In fully adjusted analyses, an increase in birth weight of 1?kg was associated with a change in fasting plasma glucose of -0.06?mmol/L (95%CI: -0.11, -0.01), 2-h plasma glucose of -0.16?mmol/L (95%CI: -0.35, 0.02), HOMA-IR of -5.45% (95%CI: -10.34, -0.29), insulin sensitivity index of 7.04% (95%CI: 1.88, 12.45) and a trend towards a reduced risk of hyperglycaemia and T2DM, although statistically insignificant.
Birth weight was inversely associated with hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance independently of adult adiposity. Thus, the findings support low birth weight as a contributing factor for glucose intolerance in adult Inuit in Greenland.
PubMed ID
30851284 View in PubMed
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Gambling behavior and problem gambling reflecting social transition and traumatic childhood events among Greenland Inuit: a cross-sectional study in a large indigenous population undergoing rapid change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119865
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2013 Dec;29(4):733-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Tine Curtis
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Oester Farimagsgade 5A, 2, 1353, Copenhagen, Denmark, cll@niph.dk.
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2013 Dec;29(4):733-48
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Behavior, Addictive - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gambling - ethnology - psychology
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Social Change
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
An increase in social pathologies is a key feature in indigenous populations undergoing transition. The Greenland Inuit are a large indigenous population constituting a majority in their own country, which makes it possible to investigate differences within the population. This led us to study gambling behavior and problem gambling among Greenland Inuit in relation to the ongoing social transition and traumatic events during childhood. A large representative cross-sectional study was conducted among Greenland Inuit (n = 2,189). Data was collected among adults (18+) in 9 towns and 13 villages in Greenland from 2005 to 2010. Problem gambling, gambling behavior and traumatic childhood events were measured through a self-administered questionnaire. The lie/bet screen was used to identify past year and lifetime problem gambling. Social transition was measured as place of residence and a combination of residence, education and occupation. The lifetime prevalence of problem gambling was 16 % among men and 10 % among women (p
PubMed ID
23065180 View in PubMed
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Harmful alcohol use and frequent use of marijuana among lifetime problem gamblers and the prevalence of cross-addictive behaviour among Greenland Inuit: evidence from the cross-sectional Inuit Health in Transition Greenland survey 2006-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115363
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:19551
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Tine Curtis
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. cll@niph.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:19551
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Behavior, Addictive - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family
Female
Gambling - ethnology
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Male
Marijuana Abuse - ethnology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Public health research has pointed to alcohol and substance abuse as the most significant public health challenges in Greenland with the negative impact on families and communities that entail, but few studies have investigated the role of problem gambling as addictive behaviour among Inuit. The objectives of the present study were to investigate (a) the association between lifetime problem gambling and harmful alcohol use as well as frequent use of marijuana and (b) the prevalence of cross-addictive behaviour among Greenland Inuit.
A representative cross-sectional study among Greenland Inuit (n=2,189). Data was collected among adults (18+) in 8 towns and 13 villages in Greenland from 2006-2010. Lifetime problem gambling, harmful alcohol use and frequent use of marijuana were measured through a self-administered questionnaire.
The odds ratio for harmful alcohol use and frequent use of marijuana was significantly higher among lifetime problem gamblers compared to non-problem gamblers/non-gamblers. One or more addictive behaviours were present among more than half of the men (53%) and one third of the women (37%), and the co-occurrence of lifetime problem gambling with either harmful alcohol use, frequent use of marijuana or both was found among 12.2% of men and 3.7% of women. The prevalence of one or more addictive behaviours was 44% in households with children.
For lifetime problem gamblers, the gambling problems were more often than not combined with harmful alcohol use, frequent use of marijuana or both--especially among men. The high prevalence of addictive behaviours in households with children indicates that many families are presently affected negatively by alcohol, gambling and marijuana. This suggests that pathological gambling should be included systematically in future public health strategies, treatment programs and interventions in Greenland.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23515920 View in PubMed
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Household crowding and psychosocial health among Inuit in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263822
Source
Int J Public Health. 2014 Oct;59(5):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Mylène Riva
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Peter Bjerregaard
Source
Int J Public Health. 2014 Oct;59(5):739-48
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Binge drinking
Crowding - psychology
Denmark
Family Characteristics
Family Relations
Female
Greenland
Health status
Health Surveys
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental disorders
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological
Young Adult
Abstract
Poor housing conditions experienced by many Indigenous peoples threaten their health and well-being. This study examines whether household crowding is associated with poorer psychosocial health among Greenlanders, and the mediating role of social support. It also assesses whether Inuit men and women are differently influenced by their housing conditions.
Data on more than 3,000 Inuit aged 18?years and older are from the Inuit health in transition Greenland survey. Associations between household crowding and composition, and mental well-being and binge drinking were examined using logistic regression models, adjusting for individuals' characteristics.
Household crowding was associated with poorer mental well-being. Binge drinking was more common among people living in households without children. These effects were more important for women than for men. The association between household crowding and mental well-being was significantly mediated by social support. This suggests that having a strong social network may buffer the deleterious impacts of household crowding.
Targeting housing conditions and fostering social support as part of population health interventions might contribute to improving psychosocial health and well-being in Greenland.
PubMed ID
25200206 View in PubMed
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Measuring social inequality in health amongst indigenous peoples in the Arctic. A comparison of different indicators of social disparity among the Inuit in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295371
Source
SSM Popul Health. 2018 Dec; 6:149-157
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Peter Bjerregaard
Inger Katrine Dahl-Petersen
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Studiestræde 6, 1455 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
Source
SSM Popul Health. 2018 Dec; 6:149-157
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The purpose of the article is to compare different indicators of social position as measures of social inequality in health in a population sample from an indigenous arctic people, the Inuit in Greenland. Data was collected during 2005-2015 and consisted of information from 3967 adult Inuit from towns and villages in all parts of Greenland. Social inequalities for smoking and central obesity were analysed in relation to seven indicators of social disparity in four dimensions, i.e. education and employment, economic status, sociocultural position, and place of residence. For each indicator we calculated age-adjusted prevalence by social group, rate ratio and the concentration index. The indicators were correlated with Pearson's r ranging from 0.24 to 0.82. Concentration indices ranged from 0.01 to 0.17. We could not conclude that one indicator was superior to others. Most of the indicators were traditional socioeconomic indicators used extensively in research in western countries and these seemed to be useful among the Inuit too, in particular household assets and job. Two sociocultural indicators developed for use among the Inuit and which included parameters specific to the indigenous peoples in the transition from a traditional to a modern life style proved to be equally useful but not superior to the traditional socioeconomic indicators. The choice of indicator must depend on what it is realistic to collect in the actual research setting and the use of more than one indicator is recommended. It is suggested to further develop culture specific indicators of social position for indigenous peoples.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30294657 View in PubMed
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Parental perceptions and management strategies for otitis media in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301288
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Jun 14; 125:15-22
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-14-2019
Author
Malene Nøhr Demant
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Preben Homøe
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Zealand University Hospital, Lykkebækvej 1, 4600, Køge, Denmark; University of Greenland, Ilisimatusarfik, Manutooq 1, 3905, Nuussuaq, Greenland. Electronic address: malenedemant@gmail.com.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Jun 14; 125:15-22
Date
Jun-14-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Otitis media (OM) in Greenland is a substantial problem and the country prevalence is among the highest in the world. However, little is known about how Greenlandic Inuit parents perceive and manage everyday life with children suffering from OM. We hypothesize that having a child with OM has consequences for the families that go beyond the advice and treatment offered in primary health care.
We conducted a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews and focus groups with parents to children suffering from OM. The interviews took place in three different Greenlandic regions; the capital Nuuk and two smaller towns in West and East Greenland. Access to specialized health care differs among the regions, creating an underlying difference on the limitations of referral and thereby level of care. We conducted the data analysis using Systematic Text Condensation.
In total, 27 parents participated in the study. Although most parents perceived OM as a result of genetic or environmental dispositions, individual perceptions and cultural beliefs of causal associations between behavior and OM co-existed with the general understanding of medical explanation models. This created a sense of guilt among the parents. Some parents felt in control of managing the disease of the child and used medically well-established strategies. Others felt frustrated and considered contact to the health clinics as futile, thereby managing the disease by 'waiting it out'. Emerging themes were shame and stigma related to the symptoms of OM, which led to social isolation as a consequence for several of the families.
Our results indicate that Greenlandic Inuit families are impacted by OM in a complex and severe manner. Guilt, shame and social isolation were predominant themes influencing the everyday life of the affected families. Perceptions and management strategies go beyond the scope of the medical explanation models which poses a potential challenge for the parents' experiences with the present treatment offer. The results underline the need to develop a broader approach to prevention and treatment for OM - both at the clinical level as well as part of public health promotion at the community level.
PubMed ID
31238157 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.