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"Grin(d) and bear it": narratives from Sami women with and without temporomandibular disorders. A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103093
Source
J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2014;28(3):243-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christina Storm Mienna
Eva E Johansson
Anders Wänman
Source
J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2014;28(3):243-51
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bruxism - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Pain - psychology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Headache - psychology
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Self Concept
Sense of Coherence - physiology
Social Support
Stress, Physiological - physiology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - psychology
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore thoughts, experiences, and beliefs regarding temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among Sami women with and without TMD in order to gain insights into their health care experiences and to generate a hypothesis regarding factors associated with long-standing TMD.
Qualitative thematic interviews were conducted with a strategic sample of 17 Sami women, of whom 10 had a TMD diagnosis according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD and 7 age-matched women who had no signs or symptoms of TMD. Their ages were between 23 and 58 years. The thematic interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed based on Grounded Theory, a qualitative methodology aiming to generate hypotheses grounded in the gathered data.
The core category that evolved was "Grin(d) and bear it," which summarizes the Sami participants' various ways and stages of processing and handling the interacting categories (triggers, strains, distrust, and reconciliation with pain and/or difficulties in life). They described divergent as well as similar understandings of triggering factors. Maintaining factors were described as mental-physical strain and stress, and also a jaw-clenching behavior. Women without TMD contributed with factors that helped them to handle strains, reconcile, and stay healthy. They relied on strong social support.
Based on the analysis, the following hypothesis was generated: Women with TMD, associated headaches, and neck-shoulder pain may benefit from efforts aimed at empowering them to use their own abilities to reduce stress behavior, strain, and disuse of the jaw. Rehabilitation strategies in groups might increase their sense of coherence and increase social support, which seems to be more limited than in women with no symptoms of TMD.
PubMed ID
25068218 View in PubMed
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Self-reported impact on daily life activities related to temporomandibular disorders, headaches, and neck-shoulder pain among women in a Sami population living in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122202
Source
J Orofac Pain. 2012;26(3):215-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Christina Storm Mienna
Anders Wanman
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, University of Umea, Umea, Sweden. christina.storm.mienna@odont.umu.se
Source
J Orofac Pain. 2012;26(3):215-24
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions
Chi-Square Distribution
Facial Pain - psychology
Female
Headache - psychology
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - psychology
Quality of Life
Self Report
Shoulder Pain - psychology
Sweden
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To analyze the influence of frequency, intensity, and duration of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), headaches, and neckshoulder pain (NSP) on Sami women's daily life. A further aim was to analyze the relationship between these symptoms and age.
All 751 Sami women 21 to 70 years old registered in either the Swedish Sami Parliament's electoral register or registered as reindeer owners or herders and living north of the Arctic Circle in Sweden were sent a questionnaire regarding TMD symptoms, NSP, and headaches. In total, 487 women (65%) participated. The questionnaire focused on symptom frequency, duration, and intensity and whether these symptoms influenced activities of daily life. The symptom's interference with daily life activities was measured, respectively, with a numerical rating scale (NRS). The statistical analyses included multiple logistic regression analysis and Chi-square test. A P value
PubMed ID
22838006 View in PubMed
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Somatic health in the Indigenous Sami population - a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309400
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1638195
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review
Date
12-2019
Author
Christina Storm Mienna
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
a Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1638195
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Life expectancy
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this systematic review was to survey the current scientific knowledge regarding the state of somatic health among situation of the Indigenous Sami people in Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia; and assess the quality of the identified studies. A systematic search in the databases Pubmed, EBSCOhost (AMED, Medline, Cinahl) and Svemed was conducted from January 2000, through December 2017. This systematic search identified 399 articles. After screening abstracts, 93 articles were reviewed in full text, 32 of which met the inclusion criteria. The scientific quality of the evidence was rated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Based on the studies with moderate to high scientific quality, there is evidence for stating that the majority of the Sami included in this review experience good health. Mortality and life expectancy are similar, with only minor differences, to those of a non-Sami population. The cancer risk rate among Sami was lower than that of the general population of Norway, Sweden and Finland. Self-reported myocardial infarction prevalence was similar between Sami and non-Sami, but Angina pectoris was more prevalent among Sami. In Sweden, cardiovascular disease rates were similar between Sami and non-Sami. Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common among the Sami population, as are obesity and overweight. To conclude, there are knowledge gaps in regard to the somatic health situation of the Indigenous Sami in the circumpolar area, especially in Russia, Finland and Sweden; as current knowledge is mainly based on publications from the SAMINOR study in Norway. No study obtained the highest quality score, suggesting a need to implement longitudinal prospective studies.
PubMed ID
31262241 View in PubMed
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Somatic health in the Indigenous Sami population - a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301549
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1638195
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2019
Author
Christina Storm Mienna
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
a Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1638195
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The objective of this systematic review was to survey the current scientific knowledge regarding the state of somatic health among situation of the Indigenous Sami people in Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia; and assess the quality of the identified studies. A systematic search in the databases Pubmed, EBSCOhost (AMED, Medline, Cinahl) and Svemed was conducted from January 2000, through December 2017. This systematic search identified 399 articles. After screening abstracts, 93 articles were reviewed in full text, 32 of which met the inclusion criteria. The scientific quality of the evidence was rated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Based on the studies with moderate to high scientific quality, there is evidence for stating that the majority of the Sami included in this review experience good health. Mortality and life expectancy are similar, with only minor differences, to those of a non-Sami population. The cancer risk rate among Sami was lower than that of the general population of Norway, Sweden and Finland. Self-reported myocardial infarction prevalence was similar between Sami and non-Sami, but Angina pectoris was more prevalent among Sami. In Sweden, cardiovascular disease rates were similar between Sami and non-Sami. Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common among the Sami population, as are obesity and overweight. To conclude, there are knowledge gaps in regard to the somatic health situation of the Indigenous Sami in the circumpolar area, especially in Russia, Finland and Sweden; as current knowledge is mainly based on publications from the SAMINOR study in Norway. No study obtained the highest quality score, suggesting a need to implement longitudinal prospective studies.
PubMed ID
31262241 View in PubMed
Less detail