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Alcohol consumption among middle-aged women: a population-based study of Swedish women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9571
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2004;10(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Jenny Cederfjäll
Jonas Lidfeldt
Christina Nerbrand
Göran Samsioe
Agneta Ojehagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jenny.cederfjall@psykiatr.lu.se
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2004;10(1):15-21
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mathematical Computing
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Wine
Abstract
From a total population of 10,766 Swedish 50- to 59-year-old women, 6,917 (64.2%) participated in the Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) study, and among them 6,623 (95.7%) answered the questions on alcohol consumption. One out of 4 women (26.0%) consumed no alcohol in an ordinary week (non-drinkers), 57.4% consumed not more than 83 g alcohol, 12.5% consumed 84-167 g and 4.2% consumed 168 g or more. The weekly drinkers had a median consumption of 40.0 g alcohol (range 2.5-1,036.0) and the main sort of alcohol was wine. Comparing the four drinking groups, most differences occurred between the non-drinking and the weekly drinking women. The non-drinkers had lower socio-demographic status, poorer health and more symptoms, especially physical symptoms. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, most associations between non-drinking and lower socio-demographic status remained.
PubMed ID
14665801 View in PubMed
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Biological factors are more important than socio-demographic and psychosocial conditions in relation to hypertension in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9857
Source
Blood Press. 2002;11(5):270-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Jonas Lidfeldt
Per Nyberg
Christina Nerbrand
Agneta Ojehagen
Göran Samsioe
Bengt Scherstén
Carl-David Agardh
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jonas.lidfeldt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Blood Press. 2002;11(5):270-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Climacteric
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Education
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to analyse the influence of biological, socio-demographic, and psychosocial factors and current perimenopausal status on hypertension in a geographically defined population of 10,766 women aged 50-59 years, of whom 6901 attended the study. Altogether 1887 (27.3%) women had hypertension: 996 with drug treatment and 891 diagnosed at the study. In a logistic multiple regression analysis (controlled for age), drug treatment of hyperlipidaemia, family history of hypertension, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index (BMI) increase > or = 25% during the past 25 years, S-triglycerides, S-cholesterol, education up to comprehensive school, and to upper secondary school, consumption of 84-167 g of alcohol/week, and of > or = 168 g of alcohol/week, were positively associated with hypertension, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and current smoking were negatively associated. A significant interaction was found between current smoking and BMI increase, with a lower risk for hypertension among smokers who had increased their BMI > or = 25%. No interaction was found between smoking and alcohol. In conclusion, hypertension was predominantly associated with biological factors, and with heredity for hypertension. Of the socio-demographic factors, only low level of education was associated with hypertension in a comprehensive analysis. Perimenopausal status showed no relation to occurrence of hypertension in the multiple regression analysis. The risk for hypertension increased with moderate and high consumption of alcohol, whereas smoking showed a decreased risk. Among women with weight gain, present smoking remained protective. Although both smoking and hypertension are established risk factors for cardiovascular disease, they seem not to be directly linked, indicating a complexity of mechanisms.
PubMed ID
12458649 View in PubMed
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Combined hormone therapy in postmenopausal women with features of metabolic syndrome. Results from a population-based study of Swedish women: Women's Health in the Lund Area study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9399
Source
Menopause. 2004 Sep-Oct;11(5):549-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yasameen A Shakir
Göran Samsioe
Christina Nerbrand
Jonas Lidfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Menopause. 2004 Sep-Oct;11(5):549-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Blood glucose
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination
Estradiol - therapeutic use
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - therapy
Middle Aged
Norethindrone - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Postmenopause - drug effects - physiology
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Urban Population
Women's health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To delineate the influence of hormone therapy (HT) on features of metabolic syndrome with special reference to the composition and mode of administration of three specific HT regimens, all containing estradiol (E2) + norethisterone. DESIGN: The Women's Health in the Lund Area project screened all women (n = 10,766), born between 1935 and 1945. Complete data were obtained from 6,917 women. Those at or above defined cutoff limits were considered positively screened (n = 3,593) for metabolic syndrome. All of them were invited to undergo an oral glucose tolerance test; 2,923 women accepted. After excluding 200 women with impaired fasting glucose, 2,723 women were included in the present analysis. Serum lipids were determined by conventional standard methods at the department of clinical chemistry of Lund University Hospital. RESULTS: According to World Health Organization criteria, 2,123 women had normal glucose tolerance and 600 women had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IGT was less common (P = 0.001) among users of a transdermal patch [CYC-TRANS; E2 50 microg + norethisterone acetate (NETA) 250microg] compared with the two-combined oral regimen [CON-O (continuous oral E2 2 mg + NETA 1 mg) + CYC-O (sequential oral E2 2 mg + NETA 1 mg)]. Furthermore, IGT was more common among CON-O users when compared with either the CYC-O + CYC-TRANS group (P = 0.002) or the CYC-TRANS only group (P = 0.001). There were no significant differences between CYC-O versus CYC-TRANS or CON-O. Serum levels of total cholesterol were higher in the CYC-TRANS group than in the combined CON-O + CYC-O group (P
PubMed ID
15356408 View in PubMed
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Does blood pressure differ between users and non-users of hormone replacement therapy? The Women's Health In the Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71551
Source
Blood Press. 2002;11(4):240-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Inger Enström
Jonas Lidfeldt
Lars H Lindholm
Christina Nerbrand
Kjell Pennert
Göran Samsioe
Author Affiliation
Kävlinge Health Centre, Sweden. Inger.Enstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Blood Press. 2002;11(4):240-3
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Comparative Study
Estrogens - pharmacology
Female
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether blood pressure over 24 h differed between postmenopausal women receiving and not receiving hormone replacement therapy. METHODS: One group of hormone replacement postmenopausal women (n = 32) and one group of non-hormone replacement (n = 32) postmenopausal women underwent non-invasive 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. They were randomly selected among the 2000 firstly screened women in an ongoing project in Lund, Sweden. The study was designed to detect a difference of 5 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure over 24 h with a power of 80% and 5% significance (two-tailed test). RESULTS: The hormone replacement women had a mean (SD) office blood pressure of 128/76 (12/8) mmHg and the non-hormone replacement 126/78 (16/8) mmHg. Mean ambulatory blood pressure over 24 h, day and night, in the hormone replacement group was 121/72 (11/7), 126/76 (12/8), 111/64 (11/7) mmHg. The corresponding values in the non-hormone replacement group were 118/72 (12/7), 124/77 (12/7), and 107/64 (13/7) (p > 0.40 for diastolic blood pressure and p > 0.20 for systolic blood pressure). Mean heart rate over 24 h was 71 (7) and 73 (8) beats/min in the hormone and non-hormone replacement groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: There was no difference in blood pressure or heart rate between the hormone replacement and non-hormone replacement postmenopausal women, either over 24 h or during the day or night. Hormone replacement in postmenopausal women seems not to have an influence on blood pressure, but of course we are aware that this is a cross-sectional study, which has its limitations.
PubMed ID
12361193 View in PubMed
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Does hormone therapy increase allergic reactions and upper gastrointestinal problems? Results from a population-based study of Swedish woman. The women's health in the Lund area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9431
Source
Maturitas. 2004 Aug 20;48(4):438-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2004
Author
Ali Khatibi E
Göran Samsioe
Cairu Li
Jonas Lidfeldbt
Carl-David Agardh
Christina Nerbrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lund University Hospital, Lund S-221 85, Sweden.
Source
Maturitas. 2004 Aug 20;48(4):438-45
Date
Aug-20-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Allergic Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Climacteric
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Loratadine - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Omeprazole - therapeutic use
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Upper Gastrointestinal Tract - pathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To delineate the use of various drugs particularly pertaining to allergy and upper gastrointestinal problems in relation to hormone status in middle aged women. METHODS: An analysis from a population-based study on women born between 1935 and 1945 and lived in the Lund area southern Sweden. Of 10,766 women, 6,917 provided complete data sets; in turn 5,673 were assessed for the use of medication in this study. Among the cohort, 9% of women were premenopausal (PM), 54% were postmenopausal without hormone replacement therapy (PM0) and 37% were current hormone replacement therapy users (PMT). RESULTS: There were 7 (1.3%) women in PM, 11 (0.4%) in PM0 and 21 (1.0%) in PMT group who used loratadine regularly. There was a significant difference between the PM and PM0 groups and also between the PM0 and PMT groups in the use of loratadine (P
PubMed ID
15283937 View in PubMed
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Effects of educational outreach visits on prescribing of benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs to elderly patients in primary health care in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76290
Source
Fam Pract. 2006 Feb;23(1):60-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Patrik Midlöv
Asa Bondesson
Tommy Eriksson
Christina Nerbrand
Peter Höglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. patrik.midlov@skane.se
Source
Fam Pract. 2006 Feb;23(1):60-4
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - drug effects
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude of Health Personnel
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Clinical Competence
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Utilization
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Family Practice - education - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Different methods have previously been tested to affect GPs' prescribing habits. Attention has been drawn to benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs that are associated with several adverse effects in the elderly. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if educational outreach visits to GP practices can affect the prescribing of benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs to the elderly and to evaluate the opinions of the participating GPs on such education. METHODS: In the county of Skåne, Sweden, 41 GP practices were invited to participate in educational outreach visits. Fifteen GP practices accepted the invitation. Practices were randomised to active (8 practices, 23 physicians) and control group (7 practices, 31 physicians). After the educational outreach visits prescribing of benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs to patients 65 years or older were measured for 1 year. The control group participated in the education after the study period. The opinions of GPs on educational outreach visits were evaluated. RESULTS: One year after the educational outreach visits there were significant decreases in the active group compared to control group in the prescribing of medium- and long-acting benzodiazepines and total benzodiazepines but not so for antipsychotic drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Educational outreach visits can be effective in modifying GPs' prescribing habits. We have shown this to be so for prescribing of benzodiazepines to elderly patients in primary health care. Educational outreach visits are also very well appreciated by participating GPs.
PubMed ID
16332945 View in PubMed
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Few middle-aged women with severe mental symptoms use psychotropic drugs: the Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9084
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(5):384-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jenny Rundberg
Jonas Lidfeldt
Christina Nerbrand
Göran Samsioe
Anders Romelsjö
Agneta Ojehagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Stockholm University, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@psykiatr.lu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(5):384-91
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: In a population of middle-aged women a survey was carried out to ascertain the prevalence of mental symptoms and psychotropic drug use, and further to investigate whether severe mental symptoms are associated with social situation, alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical health. METHODS: All women (n = 10,766) aged 50-59 years and living in the Lund area were invited to the WHILA study, a health survey including laboratory examinations and a self-administered questionnaire; 6,917 (64.2%) participated. This study is based on the questionnaire only. RESULTS: During the past three months 25.4% (n = 1,709) had been troubled by none or 1 mental symptom (labelled "absent/slight"), 52.8% (n = 3,555) by 2-6 mental symptoms ("moderate") and 21.8% (n = 1,471) by 7-10 mental symptoms ("severe"). Among women with severe mental symptoms 15.4% regularly used psychotropic drugs, mainly antidepressants. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that women with severe mental symptoms had higher odds for living alone (OR 1.7; CI 1.3-2.2) or as single parents (OR 2.1; CI 1.2-3.6), being university-educated (OR 1.5; CI 1.1-2.0), being on long-term sick-leave (OR 8.8; CI 3.0-25.5), using hormone replacement therapy (OR 1.3; CI 1.1-1.6), and having severe physical symptoms (136.8; CI 89.2-209.7) compared with women with absent/slight mental symptoms. CONCLUSION: Mental symptoms were common among the participating women. The presence of severe mental symptoms was strongly associated with severe physical symptoms. Few women with severe mental symptoms used psychotropic drugs. Middle-aged women with severe mental symptoms need to be identified and provided with appropriate psychopharmacological, hormonal, and/or psychosocial treatment.
PubMed ID
16267887 View in PubMed
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Health profile of middle-aged women: The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71684
Source
Hum Reprod. 2002 May;17(5):1379-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Cairu Li
Kittisak Wilawan
Göran Samsioe
Jonas Lidfeldt
Carl-David Agardh
Christina Nerbrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lund University Hospital, S-221 85 Sweden.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2002 May;17(5):1379-85
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Cohort Studies
Disease
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Menopause - physiology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Middle-aged women experience various health-related problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impacts of menopause status and hormone intervention on women's health. METHODS: In an ongoing, population-based study, 4943 women, born 1935 to 1945 and living in the Lund area of Southern Sweden, were included in this analysis. They completed a generic questionnaire pertaining to socio-demographic background and current health-related symptoms. Among the cohort, 9% of women were pre-menopausal (PM), 52% were post-menopausal without hormone replacement therapy (PMO) and 39% were current hormone replacement therapy users (PMT). RESULTS: Hot flushes and vaginal dryness were strongly related to menopausal status. The prevalence of somatic symptoms worsened progressively from the groups of PM to PMO to PMT. The most abundant complaints were headache and muscle-skeletal-joint problems. A total of 85% of women experienced psychological problems. Contrary to our expectation, a poorer profile of psychological health was found in the PMT group when compared with the PMO group. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of symptoms in middle-aged women could be attributed to age, hormonal influence as well as personality.
Notes
Erratum In: Hum Reprod. 2003 Jan;18(1):222.
PubMed ID
11980768 View in PubMed
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[High sense of coherence can have health enhancing effects]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71681
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Mar 14;99(11):1195-6, 1199-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2002
Author
Lena Svartvik
Jonas Lidfeldt
Christina Nerbrand
Göran Samsiö
Bengt Scherstén
Peter M Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för samhällsmedicin, Lunds Universitet. Lena.Svartvik@skane.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Mar 14;99(11):1195-6, 1199-200
Date
Mar-14-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Cross-Sectional Studies
English Abstract
Female
Health status
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
Sense of coherence (SOC), e.g. meaningfulness of life, is according to the sociologist A. Antonovsky a health-promoting construct, which has been used in a number of descriptive studies in various populations. The aim of this population-based cross-sectional study was to investigate if middle-aged women with a self-reported low level of SOC also differed in biological variables, e.g. related to glucose and lipid metabolism, from women with a high level of SOC. These variables could potentially represent links in the pathophysiological chain of events causing somatic disease. We found significant differences according to dyslipidaemia (low HDL cholesterol and increased triglyceride levels) between groups of women with differing SOC scores, most negative findings were found in the group with lowest SOC. Women with medium-high or high SOC also reported less symptoms and need of regular medical controls. The results support a potential association between cognitive processes (SOC) and biological mechanisms causing adverse health effects.
PubMed ID
11985016 View in PubMed
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The hysterectomized woman. Is she special? The women's health in the Lund area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45616
Source
Maturitas. 2006 Jan 20;53(2):201-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2006
Author
Iuliana Ceausu
Yasameen A Shakir
Jonas Lidfeldt
Göran Samsioe
Christina Nerbrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Maturitas. 2006 Jan 20;53(2):201-9
Date
Jan-20-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Amenorrhea - epidemiology
Body mass index
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects - psychology
Life Style
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To delineate the health profile of hysterectomized women and to assess whether women who have undergone hysterectomy have a different health profile even before surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The WHILA project covers all women (n = 10,766) aged 50-60, living in the Lund area and are based on questionnaires and personal interviews tied to laboratory examinations. RESULTS: 6917 women (64.2%) had complete questionnaires and laboratory tests, 800 were hysterectomized (11.6%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that hysterectomized women had more "dizziness" 1.40 (1.19-1.66), "nervous problems" 1.29 (1.07-1.56), "backache" 1.37 (1.16-1.62), "joint problems" 1.29 (1.09-1.52), "eye problem" 1.20 (1.02-1.42) and "headache" 1.17 (1.00-1.37). For both somatic (5.22 versus 4.49 mean value, p
PubMed ID
16368473 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.