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Aboriginal social organization, contemporary experience and American Indian adolescent alcohol use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9665
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):450-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Paul Spicer
Douglas K Novins
Christina M Mitchell
Janette Beals
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, P.O. Box 6508, Mailstop F800, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. paul.spicer@uchsc.edu
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):450-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
United States - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anthropologists with an interest in American Indian alcohol use have long held that how native people drink has been conditioned by aspects of the social organization of their societies prior to the disruptive influences of European colonialism. Our goal in this article was to explicitly test the importance of these factors in four contemporary American Indian cultural groups. METHOD: Using data on adolescent alcohol use drawn from the first full wave of the longitudinal Voices of Indian Teens Project (N = 1,651, 51% female), we tested whether patterns of quantity-frequency of alcohol use and the negative consequences of alcohol use predicted by social organzational variables were found among contemporary adolescents and, subsequently, whether these differences persisted when other, more proximal, variables were included. RESULTS: Cultural differences appeared to account for a small percentage of the variance in both quantity-frequency of alcohol use and negative consequences in the initial steps of our analyses, but the pattern in these data was not consistent with the predictions of existing theories regarding aboriginal social organization. Moreover, these cultural differences were no longer significant in the final step of our analyses, suggesting that the cultural differences that did exist were better explained by other factors, at least among these adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Although these analyses did not indicate that culture was irrelevant in understanding adolescent alcohol use in American Indian communities, classic formulations of these effects were of limited utility in understanding the experiences of contemporary American Indian adolescents.
Notes
Erratum In: J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jan;65(1):153
PubMed ID
12921186 View in PubMed
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Circle of Life HIV/AIDS-prevention intervention for American Indian and Alaska Native youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124561
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):140-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Carol E Kaufman
Anne Litchfield
Edwin Schupman
Christina M Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. carol.kaufman@ucdenver.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):140-53
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Culture
Curriculum
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Program Evaluation
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
This article describes the objectives, theoretical bases, development process, and evaluation efforts to-date for the Circle of Life (COL) curricula, HIV/AIDS prevention interventions designed for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. The curricula are based on Indigenous models of learning and behavior encompassing concepts of Western theories of health behavior change. The curricula underwent extensive national and community review. Subsequent advances include the development of a computer-based version of the intervention.
PubMed ID
22569729 View in PubMed
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The development of alcohol use and outcome expectancies among American Indian young adults: a growth mixture model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9220
Source
Addict Behav. 2006 Jan;31(1):1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Christina M Mitchell
Janette Beals
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, 80045, USA. Christina.Mitchell@UCHSC.edu
Source
Addict Behav. 2006 Jan;31(1):1-14
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Adolescence is an important developmental period for understanding alcohol use. American Indian youth are a group for whom various preventive interventions focusing on alcohol use have been implemented but have not necessarily been widely successful, highlighting the need to further refine our approaches. In the work reported here, we followed 464 14- to 18-year-old American Indian youth annually for seven years. We examined the development of alcohol use and positive alcohol outcome expectancies in parallel, using growth mixture modeling to identify classes with different trajectories of alcohol use and expectancies. We found five classes; the largest (n = 198) was made up of youth who experienced increases in both alcohol use and positive outcome expectancies. Initial levels of outcome expectancies were related to subsequent changes in alcohol use, while the reverse was not true, suggesting that interventions focusing on outcome expectancies are appropriate for a substantial number of youth. However, class heterogeneity in the relationships between the two processes pointed out that changes in expectancies may not always precede changes in alcohol use. Thus, intervention design implications are discussed for the class structures.
PubMed ID
15905039 View in PubMed
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Different factor loadings for SF36: The Strong Heart Study and the National Survey of Functional Health Status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5515
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Feb;59(2):208-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Janette Beals
Thomas K Welty
Christina M Mitchell
Dorothy A Rhoades
Jeun-Liang Yeh
Jeffrey A Henderson
Spero M Manson
Dedra S Buchwald
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, F800, P.O. Box 6508, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Feb;59(2):208-15
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To increase our understanding of the psychometric characteristics and factor structure of the SF36(R) in older American Indian populations. METHODS: Between 1993 and 1995, SF36(R) data were collected from 3,488 Phase II participants of the Strong Heart Study (SHS) between the ages of 48 and 81. Comparison data were provided by an age- and gender-matched sample (n = 695) from the National Survey of Functional Health Status (NSFHS) conducted in 1989 and 1990. RESULTS: Generally, the basic psychometric analyses showed that the SF36(R) performed adequately in these older American Indians. Exploratory factor analyses indicated that a one-factor model best fit the data for both older groups. On the other hand, confirmatory factor analyses showed that a two-factor model with correlated factors provided a superior fit to the data than a one-factor model. An assumption of equivalent factor loadings for the SHS and NSFHS groups was untenable. CONCLUSION: These analyses demonstrate that use of summary scores assuming a differentiated physical/mental functioning structure is likely improper in at least some populations. The SF36(R) provides an important opportunity to understand cultural differences in the conceptualization and measurement of health-related quality of life.
PubMed ID
16426957 View in PubMed
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Drug use among two American Indian populations: prevalence of lifetime use and DSM-IV substance use disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6701
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2003 Jan 24;69(1):29-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-2003
Author
Christina M Mitchell
Janette Beals
Douglas K Novins
Paul Spicer
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80220, USA. christina.mitchell@uchsc.edu
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2003 Jan 24;69(1):29-41
Date
Jan-24-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Northwestern United States - ethnology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Southwestern United States - ethnology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
American Indians (AIs) have often reported higher rates of drug use than have other racial/ethnic groups. However, the majority of these studies have focused on drug use among high school adolescents, with little attention to pathological use such as drug abuse or dependence. This study is among the first to report lifetime drug use and disorder (abuse/dependence) information from community samples of two culture groups of AI people-one in the Southwest (SW), one in the Northern Plains (NP)-ranging in age from 15 to 57 years old. Analyses were conducted within four groups: SW men, SW women, NP men, and NP women. Across the four groups, lifetime use rates for marijuana (36.9-57.5%), cocaine (4.3-21.5%), and inhalants (3.6-17.0%) were the highest drug use rates; heroin (0.5-2.1%), the lowest. Lifetime drug disorder rates were highest for marijuana (4.5-14.1%), cocaine (1.1-2.3%), and stimulants (0.7-1.7%). Lifetime polydrug use disorder rates from 1.2 to 4.5%. Women generally had lower prevalence rates than did men in their culture group. The SW women generally had the lowest rates of use and disorder. Lifetime use and disorder rates among the youngest group were often not different from rates of the older groups. Overall, 40-60% had never used any drugs; 85-95% had not developed any drug disorder. Despite widespread concern and rhetoric about drug problems among AIs, many who had used various drugs either were using them without serious consequences or had quit use altogether.
PubMed ID
12536064 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology and etiology of substance use among American Indians and Alaska Natives: risk, protection, and implications for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121185
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):376-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Nancy Rumbaugh Whitesell
Janette Beals
Cecelia Big Crow
Christina M Mitchell
Douglas K Novins
Author Affiliation
Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver , Aurora, CO 80045, USA. nancy.whitesell@ucdenver.edu
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):376-82
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The epidemiology and etiology of substance use and disorder in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities have received increasing attention over the past 25 years and accumulating evidence provides important insights into substance use patterns in these populations.
We provide a descriptive sketch of the AI/AN population in the United States today, present a brief review of the literature on the epidemiology and etiology of substance use within these populations, and discuss key implications of this literature for prevention efforts.
Patterns of alcohol use and abuse in AI/AN populations are complex and vary across cultural groups, but alcohol clearly impacts both physical health and mental health within these communities. Tobacco use - and associated health consequences - is typically higher in these populations than among other US groups, although significant variation across Native communities is apparent here as with alcohol. Evidence regarding drug use and disorder is less extensive and thus less conclusive, but evidence demonstrates higher rates of use as well. Etiological explanations for substance use and disorder cut across individual characteristics (e.g., genetics) or experiences (e.g., exposure to trauma), to social contexts (e.g., family disruption), and to cultural factors (e.g., historical trauma). Protective factors likely cut across these multiple levels as well and deserve more focused attention for informing prevention efforts. The development of effective prevention strategies, built through collaboration between researchers and Native communities, drawing from the wisdom of both, is a high priority.
PubMed ID
22931069 View in PubMed
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Identifying diverse HIV risk groups among American Indian young adults: the utility of cluster analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2962
Source
AIDS Behav. 2004 Sep;8(3):263-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Christina M Mitchell
Carol E Kaufman
Janette Beals
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. christina.mitchell@uchsc.edu
Source
AIDS Behav. 2004 Sep;8(3):263-75
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Awareness
Cluster analysis
Comorbidity
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - psychology - transmission
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Midwestern United States
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk-Taking
Self Efficacy
Abstract
We demonstrate the utility of cluster analysis for identifying diverse HIV risk groups found in a community-based sample. Within a group of 706 American Indian young adults, we used cluster analysis to identify four profiles of HIV risk/protection. The High Efficacy/Low Risk cluster had high levels of knowledge/education, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations about HIV protection, with low levels of risk behaviors. Low Efficacy/Low Risk had low levels of HIV knowledge/education, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations, but high levels of perceived risk for HIV with low levels of HIV risk behaviors. Low Efficacy/Moderate Risk was similar to the previous group, but its members had moderately higher levels of several risk behaviors and higher condom use. Low Efficacy/High Risk had high rates of several high-risk behaviors such as exchanging sex for money or injection drug use. Validation analyses highlighted differences that can be useful for the development of preventive interventions.
PubMed ID
15477733 View in PubMed
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Impact of targeted health promotion on cardiovascular knowledge among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114025
Source
Health Educ Res. 2013 Jun;28(3):437-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Angela G Brega
Katherine A Pratte
Luohua Jiang
Christina M Mitchell
Sarah A Stotz
Crystal Loudhawk-Hedgepeth
Brad D Morse
Tim Noe
Kelly R Moore
Janette Beals
Author Affiliation
Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. angela.brega@ucdenver.edu
Source
Health Educ Res. 2013 Jun;28(3):437-49
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Curriculum
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Young Adult
Abstract
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute developed the Honoring the Gift of Heart Health (HGHH) curriculum to promote cardiovascular knowledge and heart-healthy lifestyles among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Using data from a small randomized trial designed to reduce diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among overweight/obese AI/ANs, we evaluated the impact of an adapted HGHH curriculum on cardiovascular knowledge. We also assessed whether the curriculum was effective across levels of health literacy (defined as the 'capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions'). We examined change in knowledge from baseline to 3 months for two groups: HGHH (N = 89) and control (N = 50). Compared with controls, HGHH participants showed significant improvement in heart attack knowledge and marginally significant improvement in stroke and general CVD knowledge. HGHH participants attending =1 class showed significantly greater improvement than controls on all three measures. Although HGHH participants with inadequate health literacy had worse heart attack and stroke knowledge at baseline and 3 months than did participants with adequate skills, the degree of improvement in knowledge did not differ by health literacy level. HGHH appears to improve cardiovascular knowledge among AI/ANs across health literacy levels.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23660462 View in PubMed
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Latent class analysis of substance use: comparison of two American Indian reservation populations and a national sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8998
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2006 Jan;67(1):32-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Nancy R Whitesell
Janette Beals
Christina M Mitchell
Douglas K Novins
Paul Spicer
Spero M Manson
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, Mail Stop F800, P.O. Box 6508, Aurora, Colorado 80045-0508, USA. Nancy.Whitesell@ucsc.edu
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2006 Jan;67(1):32-43
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to carefully examine disparities in substance use between two American Indian reservation communities and a national sample. We sought to identify characteristic patterns of use-both across and within samples-that could be used to inform intervention efforts aimed at reducing disparities. METHOD: Latent class analyses were used to identify subgroups within each sample that were characterized by distinctive patterns of use of alcohol and eight drugs; the use patterns and prevalence of subgroups were then compared across samples. American Indian data were from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP; N=2647), which comprised participants from two distinct cultural groups in the Southwest (SW; n=1244; 57% female) and Northern Plains (NP; n=1443; 52% female). National data were from the public use file of the 1999 National Household Survey of Drug Abuse (NHSDA; N = 39.152; 52% female). RESULTS: Four classes of lifetime users (abstainers, primarily alcohol users, primarily alcohol and marijuana users, and polysubstance users) and three classes of past-year users (abstainers, primarily alcohol users, and alcohol and drug users) were identified in each sample (SW, NP, NHSDA). Despite consistency in classes of users found across these samples, there were notable sample differences in class prevalence. The modal class for lifetime use, for example, was primarily alcohol users in the SW and NHSDA, and primarily alcohol and marijuana use in the NP. The concordance of lifetime and past-year use classes also varied across the three samples, and examination of past-year abstainers in conjunction with lifetime-use class suggested potentially important differences in the stability of substance-use patterns over time. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the utility of latent class techniques for understanding substance use, comparing substance use across populations and identifying key points of intervention, prevention, and treatment within different communities.
PubMed ID
16536127 View in PubMed
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Mechanisms underlying the relationship between health literacy and glycemic control in American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125268
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2012 Jul;88(1):61-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Angela G Brega
Alfonso Ang
William Vega
Luohua Jiang
Janette Beals
Christina M Mitchell
Kelly Moore
Spero M Manson
Kelly J Acton
Yvette Roubideaux
Author Affiliation
Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. angela.brega@ucdenver.edu
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2012 Jul;88(1):61-8
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Blood Glucose - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - therapy
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Research suggests that health literacy (HL) is associated with clinical outcomes. Few studies, however, have examined the mechanisms accounting for this relationship. To understand why HL is related to outcomes, we tested a theoretical framework proposing that diabetes-related knowledge and behavior mediate (explain) the relationship between HL and glycemic control (i.e., A1c).
Analyses used baseline data from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Project (N=2594), an intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with diabetes. Three nested structural equation models tested the theoretical framework.
Model 1 demonstrated that participants with stronger HL skills had better glycemic control. Model 2 tested whether diabetes-related behaviors accounted for this relationship. Self-monitoring of blood glucose significantly mediated the HL-A1c relationship. Model 3 examined the role of diabetes knowledge, showing that it mediated the relationship between HL and dietary behavior. When knowledge was included, behavior was no longer a significant mediator, suggesting that knowledge was the main driver of the relationship between HL with A1c.
Interventions to improve knowledge may be particularly important in enhancing outcomes among AI/ANs with diabetes.
Strategies known to enhance patient comprehension may enable low-literate patients to develop needed diabetes knowledge.
PubMed ID
22497973 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.